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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 65:1

 

 

There will be silence before You, and praise in Zion, O God, And to You the vow will be performed.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Praise waiteth for thee - Praise is silent or dumb for thee. Thou alone art worthy of praise; all other perfections are lost in thine; and he who considers thee aright can have no other subject of adoration.

Unto thee shall the vow be performed - All offerings and sacrifices should be made to thee. All human spirits are under obligation to live to and serve thee. All Jews and Christians, by circumcision and baptism, belong to thee; and they are all bound to pay the vow of their respective covenants to thee alone; and the spirit of this vow is, to love thee with all their powers and to serve thee with a perfect heart and willing mind, all the days of their life.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-65.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Sion - That is, all the arrangements are made; the people are assembled; their hearts are prepared to praise thee. The fact that Zion is mentioned here as the seat of praise would seem to imply that this psalm was composed before the building of the temple, contrary to the opinion of DeWette and others, as noticed in the Introduction to the psalm, for after the building of the temple the seat of worship was transferred from Mount Zion, where David had placed the ark and prepared a tent for it 1 Chronicles 15:1; 1 Chronicles 16:1; 2 Chronicles 1:4, to Mount Moriah. It is true that the general name Zion was given familiarly to Jerusalem as a city, but it is also true that the particular place for the worship of God in the time of David was Mount Zion strictly so called. See the notes at Psalm 2:6. The margin in this place is, “Praise is silent.” The Hebrew is, “To thee is silence-praise,” - a kind of compound phrase, not meaning “silent praise,” but referring to a condition where everything is ready; where the preparations have been entirely made; where the noise usually attendant on preparation has ceased, and all is in readiness as if waiting for that for which the arrangements had been carried forward. The noise of building - of preparation - was now hushed, and all was calm. The language here would also denote the state of feeling in an individual or an assembly, when the heart was prepared for praise; when it was filled with a deep sense of the majesty and goodness of God; when all feelings of anxiety were calmed down, or were in a state of rest; when the soul was ready to burst forth in expressions of thanksgiving, and nothing would meet its needs but praise.

And unto thee shall the vow be performed - See Psalm 22:25, note; Psalm 50:14, note; Psalm 56:12, note. The reference here is to the vows or promises which the people had made in view of the manifested judgments of God and the proofs of his goodness. Those vows they were now ready to carry out in expressions of praise.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-65.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

PSALM 65

THE EARTH AS EVIDENCE OF GOD'S LOVE FOR MAN

MAN DOES NOT LIVE ALONE

SUPERSCRIPTION: FOR THE CHIEF MUSICIAN.

A PSALM. A SONG OF DAVID.

The title which we have assigned to this psalm is inspired by a little book entitled, "Man Does not Live Alone," by A. Cresy Morrison (Fleming H. Revell Company), in which he enumerated many of the almost innumerable features of the earth itself which make it suitable for the home of God's human creation, many of which features appear to defy the very laws of nature, the entire result of which speaks eloquently of the providence of God.

One of those God-arranged features of our planet, without which life, as we know it, would be impossible is the expansion of water when it freezes, that quality being unique among all liquids. Others are the exact distance of the moon from our planet, the exact angle of the earth's tilted inclination upon its axis, etc. All such marvelous providential arrangements of the earth are dramatically stated in this psalm, "Thou hast so prepared the earth" (Psalms 65:9).

The assignment of the psalm to David in the superscription is denied by many scholars who admit at the same time that they have no idea who wrote it; and we continue to remain unimpressed with that kind of `information.'

The grounds upon which the Davidic authorship is denied include:

(a) the mention of the temple and its courts (Psalms 65:4). However, we have repeatedly noted that this terminology is scripturally applied to the "tabernacle" as well as to the temple. Besides that, as Leupold observed, "Spiritual fellowship is intended here rather than physical presence in some public sanctuary."[1]

(b) Another ground of denying David as the author is in the allegation that "the style" here is not that of David, to which the reply should be made that there are no "experts" on the alleged "style" of David's writings, whose testimony is any more dependable than the affirmations of the superscription.

(c) A third basis of denying Davidic authorship was stated by Delitzsch. "It is uncritical to assign to David all the Psalms ascribed to him in the superscriptions."[2] This statement is nothing more than an admission that it is very popular among critics to deny Davidic authorship of psalms ascribed to him, whenever it is possible to do so. This also, in our opinion, constitutes no valid grounds whatever for such denials.

In this light, "We are content to let the heading stand as it is."[3] No, of course, we cannot prove it, but what difference does that make? "On the basis of material in the Psalm itself, David's authorship can be neither proved nor disproved."[4]

There are three natural divisions of the psalm. (1) God is praised for his moral qualities (Psalms 65:1-5). (2) God is praised for his preparation of the earth as a dwelling place for mankind (Psalms 65:6-9). (3) God is praised for an abundant harvest (Psalms 65:10-13).

PRAISING GOD FOR WHAT HE DOES FOR HIS PEOPLE

Psalms 65:1-5

"Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Zion;

And unto thee shall the vow be performed.

O thou that hearest prayer,

Unto thee shall all flesh come.

Iniquities prevail against me:

As for our transgressions, thou wilt forgive them.

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and causeth to approach unto thee,

That he may dwell in thy courts:

We shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house,

Thy holy temple.

By terrible things wilt thou answer us in righteousness,

O God of our salvation,

Thou that art the confidence of the ends of the earth,

And of them that are afar off upon the sea."

God is here praised:

(a) because He hears prayers (Psalms 65:2)

(b) because He forgives sins (Psalms 65:3)

(c) because He provides fellowship with Himself for His people "in His courts," that is, in His presence in heaven, (Psalms 65:4), and

(d), because He delivers His people from their enemies (Psalms 65:5).

"Praise waiteth for God ... vows shall be performed" (Psalms 65:1). It may seem strange that "praise" and "vows" should thus be mentioned together, but McCaw's explanation is excellent.

"The vows of Old Testament religion were not techniques of putting pressure on God or driving a bargain with him. They were a recognition that prayer for God's blessing must go hand in hand with consecration, and that thanksgiving can never be merely verbal, but must receive concrete expression in lives and goods. Thus, both `praise' and `vows' are abundantly due to a bountiful God."[5]

"O thou that hearest prayer" (Psalms 65:2). There is nothing more wonderful that can be known about God than this very fact that he answers our prayers. The Scriptures strongly emphasize the Christian's duty to pray. "Ask and it shall be given you; seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you": "Men ought always to pray and not to faint"; "Whatsoever ye shall ask of the Father in my name, he will give you"; "Ask and ye shall receive, that your joy may be full"; "The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much." All of these commandments are the precious words of the New Testament.

"Unto thee shall all flesh come" (Psalms 65:2). Some would restrict this mention of "all flesh" to mean "all Israel," but it appears to us that, coupled with, "the ends of the earth" (Psalms 65:5) and the "uttermost parts" (Psalms 65:8), there is an echo here of the promise to Abraham that "all the families of the earth" were to be blessed in the Seed Singular of that patriarch, even in Jesus Christ.

Leupold cited these words, "As an obvious protest against an unwholesome exclusivism into which Israel of old might have been in danger of falling."[6] Indeed it was such an exclusivism that led to the Jewish hatred of Paul and his mission to the Gentiles, and which was also the key element in their violent rejection of Christianity.

"Iniquities ... thou wilt forgive them" (Psalms 65:3). These words also are a prophecy of a time yet future when the psalmist wrote; because the forgiveness of sins was given by Jeremiah as one of the distinctive elements of the New Covenant (Jeremiah 31:31-35).

"Iniquities prevail against me ... our transgressions" (Psalms 65:3). Note the "me" and "our" pronouns here, also that forgiveness was not given to the psalmist until it was simultaneously bestowed upon him and the nation. The truth behind this is that the actual expiation for sins did not occur in the Old Testament at all but at the Cross of Jesus Christ. Whatever "forgiveness" was available to God's saints under the Old Covenant, it was tentative and not final. "There was a remembrance made of sins year by year" (Hebrews 10:3). All sins, both those of the Old Covenant and the New Covenant, were removed by the Atonement of Christ on Calvary, where he died, "for the sins of the whole world" (1 John 2:2).

It was in the spirit of prophecy alone that the psalmist could have written these words.

"Blessed is the man whom thou choosest" (Psalms 65:4). The psalmist here was probably thinking of the choice of Israel to be the Chosen People and to bring in the Messiah for the salvation all men, but the words are unlimited in their application. "Not only, `blessed is the nation' (Psalms 33:12), but `blessed is the man,' the particular man, how mean soever, whom God chooses, and causes him to approach God. Such a man is the happiest of mortals; he shall dwell in the courts of God, for he has been assured of divine favor and has received the pledge and the earnest of everlasting bliss."[7]

"By terrible things in righteousness" (Psalms 65:5). This verse is a sequel to Psalms 65:2; and what is referred to is, "The terrible acts of God's righteous judgments upon the enemies of Israel."[8] In God's dealings with Israel, there were many occasions which fit this description. The destruction of Pharaoh's army in the Red Sea and the death of Sennacherib's army of 185,000 men in a single night are two examples.

"Thou that art the confidence of all the ends of the earth" (Psalms 65:5). There is no way to avoid the application of these words to the entire human race. The God of Israel is indeed the God of all men, the only hope of salvation that our poor world has ever had, or ever shall have.

The inspired author of these words might have been trying in such words as these to awaken Israel to their God-given mission of enlightening all the world with the knowledge of the One God, a mission which, it seems, was never any big concern of the Chosen People, who stubbornly held to the conceit that they alone were the object of God's love and concern.

The words of Psalms 65:5 here flatly declare that the only hope and confidence of the remotest man on earth is only in the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-65.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Sion,.... Who dwells in Sion, as Jarchi interprets it; and so the Targum; whose Shechinah, or glorious Majesty, is in Sion; see Psalm 76:2; or else Sion, which designs no other than the church of God, and which is so called under the Gospel dispensation, Hebrews 12:22; is the place where "praise" waits for God, that being the city of our solemnities, as well as the city of the great King; and not only a house of prayer, but of praise, where the sacrifices, both of prayer and praise, are offered to God through Christ with acceptance: and praise may be said to "wait" for him here, because it is "due" to him here, as some render it, on account of many blessings and privileges of grace here enjoyed, through the word and ordinances; and because the people of God wait upon him here with their tribute of praise, which is comely in them to bring, and is "agreeable" and acceptable to him; and because it "remains", abides, and continues here; or, in other words, the saints are continually praising the Lord here, giving thanks to him always for all things, Psalm 84:4; some render the words "praise is silent for thee"F5לך דמיה תהלה "tibi silet laus", Pagninus, Vatablus. ; because there is no end of it, as Jarchi observes; or, because of the greatness of the works of the Lord, praise cannot reach him, as Ben Melech expresses it. The greatest shouts, and loudest acclamations of praise, are but silence in comparison of what ought, if it could be expressed, on account of the nature, perfections, and works of God. The Targum is,

"before thee praise is reputed as silence.'

In the king of Spain's Bible it is,

"the praise of angels is reputed before thee as silence;'

perhaps it may be best rendered, "to thee belong", or "are due, silence and praise"F6"Tibi silentium est et laus", Piscator, Gejerus. : there ought to be first a silent and quiet waiting upon God for mercies wanted, and which he has promised to give; and, when they are bestowed, praise should be rendered unto him. GussetiusF7Ebr. Comment. p. 193. gives the sense of the words, and renders them,

"praise, which is thine image, which bears a likeness to thee shall be paid in Sion;'

and unto thee shall the vow be performed: that is, of praise and thankfulness for deliverance and salvation, made in a time of trouble and distress; see Psalm 66:13.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-65.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

"To the chief Musician, A Psalm [and] Song of David." a Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Sion: and unto thee shall the vow be performed.

(a) You daily give new opportunities to your Church to praise you.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-65.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Psalm 65:1-13. This is a song of praise for God‘s spiritual blessings to His people and His kind providence over all the earth.

Praise waiteth for thee — literally, “To Thee silence praise,” or (compare Psalm 62:1), To Thee silence is praise - that is, Praise is waiting as a servant; it is due to Thee. So the last clause expresses the duty of paying vows. These two parts of acceptable worship, mentioned in Psalm 50:14, are rendered in Zion, where God chiefly displays His mercy and receives homage.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-65.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1Praise waiteth for thee, O God! in Zion Literally it runs, Praise is silent to thee, but the verb דמיה, dumiyah, has been metaphorically rendered first, to be at rest, then to wait. The meaning of the expression is, that God’s goodness to his people is such as to afford constantly new matter of praise. It is diffused over the whole world, but specially shown to the Church. Besides, others who do not belong to the Church of God, however abundantly benefits may be showered upon them, see not whence they come, and riot in the blessings which they have received without any acknowledgement of them. But the main thing meant to be conveyed by the Psalmist is, that thanksgiving is due to the Lord for his goodness shown to his Church and people. The second clause of the verse is to the same effect, where he says, unto thee shall the vow be performed; for while he engages on the part of the people to render due acknowledgement, his language implies that there would be ever remaining and new grounds of praise.

With the verse which we have been now considering, that which follows stands closely connected, asserting that God hears the prayers of his people. This forms a reason why the vow should be paid to him, since God never disappoints his worshippers, but crowns their prayers with a favorable answer. Thus, what is stated last, is first in the natural order of consideration. The title here given to God carries with it a truth of great importance, That the answer of our prayers is secured by the fact, that in rejecting them he would in a certain sense deny his own nature. The Psalmist does not say, that God has heard prayer in this or that instance, but gives him the name of the hearer of prayer, as what constitutes an abiding part of his glory, so that he might as soon deny himself as shut his ear to our petitions. Could we only impress this upon our minds, that it is something peculiar to God, and inseparable from him, to hear prayer, it would inspire us with unfailing confidence. The power of helping us he can never want, so that nothing can stand in the way of a successful issue of our supplications. What follows in the verse is also well worthy of our attention, that all flesh shall come unto God. None could venture into his presence without a persuasion of his being open to entreaty; but when he anticipates our fears, and comes forward declaring that prayer is never offered to him in vain, the door is thrown wide for the admission of all. The hypocrite and the ungodly, who pray under the constraint of present necessity, are not heard; for they cannot be said to come to God, when they have no faith founded upon his word, but a mere vague expectation of a chance issue. Before we can approach God acceptably in prayer, it is necessary that his promises should be made known to us, without which we can have no access to him, as is evident from the words of the apostle Paul, (Ephesians 3:12,) where he tells us, that all who would come to God must first be endued with such a faith in Christ as may animate them wig confidence. From this we may infer, that no right rule of prayer is observed in the Papacy, when they pray to God in a state of suspense and doubt. Invaluable is the privilege which we enjoy by the Gospel, of free access unto God. When the Psalmist uses the expression, all flesh, he intimates by these few words that the privilege which was now peculiar to the Jews, would be extended to all nations. It is a prediction of Christ’s future kingdom.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-65.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 65:1 « To the chief Musician, A Psalm [and] Song of David. » Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Sion: and unto thee shall the vow be performed.

A Psalm and Song of David] Made by him, as it is thought, when the people were delivered from that three years’ famine for the slaughter of the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21:1, and that three days’ pestilence for David’s sin, in numbering the people, 2 Samuel 24:13-15

Ver. 1. Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Sion] Tibi silentinm, laus tibi, Deus, in Zion; so Beza rendereth it. There is first a deep silence in Sion, and then due praise; a silence of admiration, a silence of religious awe and devotion, such as was afterwards that in the Christian Church, Revelation 8:1, or a silence of expectation to receive mercies; and a praise, by way of retribution, for mercies received. Or, silence in all other places (not sensible of God’s favours), but praise in the Church, where God is magnified: first, for blessings proper and peculiar to his own people; secondly, for preserving commonwealths, and thereby providing graciously for human society; and, thirdly, for giving men all things richly to enjoy, as in the end of this psalm.

And unto thee shall the vow be performed] That is, solemn thanks shall be rendered. Thy people stand ready pressed with their praises and memories, as Joseph’s brethren once did with their presents, against the time that he showed himself.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-65.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 65.

David praiseth God for his grace. The blessedness of God's chosen, by reason of benefits.

To the chief musician. A Psalm and Song of David.

Title. שׁיר לדוד מזמור למנצח lamnatseach mizmor ledavid shiir. This psalm is attributed to David, and, by the contents of it, appears to have been made after some great drought; and therefore some suppose it to relate to the famine mentioned 2 Samuel 21. Dr. Delaney says, it is on all hands agreed to have been composed upon the ceasing of that calamity. See on Psalms 65:9. It is further said, by some, to have a spiritual sense; significative of the preaching of the apostles, who converted the heathen by the promulgation of the Gospel.

Psalms 65:1. Praise waiteth for thee Or, as the words may be rendered, Silence to thee is praise. This, according to Mr. Martin, refers to the religious silence of the whole congregation in the tabernacle, while the priest offered incense in the sanctuary. Thus St. Luke tells us, that the whole multitude of the people were praying without, or offering up their silent devotions in that part of the temple which was appointed for them, while Zacharias was within the sanctuary at the time of incense, Luke 1:10.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-65.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This is a lovely Psalm: the sacred writer celebrates God's praise; points out the blessedness of God's chosen; and shows both their temporal and spiritual mercies.

To the chief musician, A Psalm and Song of David.

Psalms 65:1

This Psalm opens with a peculiarity of expression, which merits our attention in a more than ordinary degree, because we do not find any phrase so strong to the great point the Psalmist had in view, in any other part of scripture. Praise waiteth for thee; or as the Chaldee renders it, All praise is silent before thee; meaning that the highest exaltation men or angels can put forth is so low beneath the subject, that it is as if nothing were said. The waiting for God means, no doubt, waiting the Lord's time, the Lord's acceptance, the Lord's mercy, to look graciously upon it. And where is it that this praise waits? In Zion, at Jerusalem. For there alone, in Christ, can either the person, or the offerings of the people be accepted. Sweet and, precious thought! It is only in Jesus, who is the way, and the truth, and the life, that we can come to God. He hath made us accepted in the beloved; John 14:6; Ephesians 1:6. And what an encouraging scripture is that of the prophet, to bring our praises to our God and Father in Christ Jesus, in which the Holy Ghost hath said The people shall dwell in Zion, at Jerusalem: thou shalt weep no more: he will be very gracious unto thee, at the voice of thy cry; when he shall hear it, he will answer thee. Isaiah 30:19. Reader, do not fail to remark from this sweet verse, how suitable it is in the Lord's people to wait upon him without distraction of thought, and in silence to be prepared for the visits of God's Holy Spirit, before we offer the Lord either our prayers or our praises. How striking is the Lord's direction to this amount! Keep silence before me, O islands, and let the people renew their strength; let them come near - then let them speak. Isaiah 41:1; Habakkuk 2:20.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-65.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PSALM 65

THE ARGUMENT

The design of this Psalm seems to be to declare the great and glorious work of Divine Providence, both towards his church and the land of his people, and towards the rest of mankind.

David praiseth God for spiritual blessings, as hearing prayer, and purging away sin, Psalms 65:1-3, and for the blessedness of those that dwell in his courts, Psalms 65:4; and also for temporal blessings, as governing the world, and the abundance of all worldly enjoyments, Psalms 65:5-13.

Waiteth, Heb. is silent, or silence, i.e. quietly waits, as this phrase is used also Psalms 62:1. And praise may be here put for the person or persons who use to praise God upon all occasions, and who are now prepared and ready to do so; as deceit is put for a deceitful man, as Proverbs 12:24, and sin for the sinner, Proverbs 13:6, and dreams for dreamers, Jeremiah 27:9. So the meaning may seem to be this, God’s people patiently and believingly wait for an opportunity to offer their praises to God; for at present they seem to be in some straits, as divers passages of this Psalm do intimate. In Zion: though all the people of the world have great cause to praise thee, yet none pay thee this tribute, but thy people in Zion; and they indeed have really peculiar and eminent obligations and occasions to perform this duty.

Unto thee shall the vow be performed; all the thank-offerings which thy people vowed unto thee in the time of their danger shall be faithfully paid, to wit,

in Zion; which is to be repeated out of the first clause of the verse.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-65.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1. Praise waiteth—Or, Praise is silent; or, To thee silence is praise: see on Psalms 62:1, and Revelation 8:1. Submitting all things to the will of God, and quietly resting there, is as praise; and this only could make praise or prayer acceptable.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-65.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 65:1. Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Zion — Waits in expectation of the mercy desired; waits till it arrives, that it may be received with thankfulness at its first approach. For, when God is coming toward us with his favours, we must go forth to meet him with our praises. Praise waits with an entire satisfaction in thy holy will, and in dependance on thy mercy. When we stand ready in every thing to give thanks, then praise waits for God. Hebrew, לךְ דמיה תהלה, lecha dumijah tehillah, praise is silent unto thee, as wanting words to express thy great goodness, and being struck with silent admiration of it. As there are holy groanings in prayer, which cannot be uttered, so there are holy adorations in praise which cannot be expressed, and yet shall be accepted by Him who searcheth the heart, and knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit. Our praise is silent, that the praises of the blessed angels, that excel in strength, may be heard. Before thee (thus the Chaldee) praise is reputed as silence. So far is God exalted above all our blessing and praise. Praise is due to God from all the world; but it waits for him in Sion only, in his church among his people; all his works praise him, that is, they minister matter for praise, but only his saints bless him by actual adorations. Unto thee shall the vow be performed The sacrifices and thank-offerings, which thy people vowed unto thee, in the time of their danger, when they were supplicating deliverance, and other blessings, at thy hands, shall be faithfully paid. We shall not be accepted in our thanksgivings to God for the mercies we have received, unless we make conscience of paying the vows which we made when we were in pursuit of these mercies; for better is it not to vow than to vow and not to pay.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-65.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Psalm. Cassiodorus, &c., add, "of David." But it is thought, he was not the author of this and the following piece, as his name is not in the original. (Calmet) --- This argument is, however, of small weight. --- Resurrection. Hebrew, Origen's Septuagint, &c., omit these words, (Berthier, T. iii.) which seem to have been added by some Greek Christian, who thought he perceived some allusion to the resurrection of Christ, ver. 9. The Fathers have well explained it in this sense, though they also apply it literally to the return of the captives, (Theodoret; Calmet) and to the general resurrection, the end of all the miseries of the elect, (Bellarmine) as well as to the conversion of the Gentiles, (Genebrard) and the resurrection of a soul from the state of sin. (Haydock)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-65.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Title. A Psalm. Hebrew. mizmor. App-65.

Song. Hebrew. shir. App-65.

of David = by, or relating to David and the true David.

waiteth. As in Psalms 62:1. Israel"s silent waiting is now passed on to Zion. All is silent there as yet.

God. Hebrew. Elohim. App-4.

Sion. See App-68. David"s tabernacle was there. This spelling with "S" comes through the Septuagint and Vulgate Hebrew is always "Z".


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-65.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Sion: and unto thee shall the vow be performed.

Psalms 65:1-13.-Three strophes. God gives occasion for praise in Zion by hearing prayer, purging away transgression, and satisfying with the goodness of His house (Psalms 65:1-4); as God of the whole world, He displays His terrors in answer to His people's cry, and stilleth the waves and tumults, to the uttermost parts of the earth, for them (Psalms 65:5-8); as God of nature, He so fertilizes the earth that the year is crowned with blessing, and the valleys sing (Psalms 65:9-13). The "sing" in Psalms 65:13, the conclusion, answers to song in the title. God's harvest-blessings-a pledge of His universal care of His people-is the primary subject. The ulterior reference is to the blessedness of the millennial earth and of God's people.

Praise waiteth for thee ... in Zion - literally, 'for thee (there is) the silence (of) praise,' etc. 'Silence-praise' -

i.e., the praise which produces still repose of the soul on her God (cf. note, Psalms 42:1; Psalms 42:5). God is ever giving new causes for praise. Praise, with calm reposing on God, effectually allays the agitation which distresses the soul so long as it looks in trouble elsewhere than to God (Psalms 42:5; Psalms 131:2). Zion was the only legitimate place of worship (Psalms 132:14). Its antitype now is the spiritual city, or Church of Christ.

And unto thee shall the vow be performed. The Vulgate, Arabic, and many manuscripts add 'in Jerusalem,' which suits the parallelism.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-65.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Praise waiteth . . .—Literally, To thee silence praise, which recalls Psalms 62:1 (see Note), but must be differently explained. To say, Praise is silence to thee, is hardly intelligible. The LXX. and Vulg. read differently, “praise is comely.” Better supply a conjunction, To thee are quiet and praise, i.e., submissive expectation till the deliverance come (Psalms 62:1), and then exulting praise.

Shall the vow.—Better, Is the vow paid, i.e., by the praise just mentioned.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-65.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Praise waiteth for thee, O God, in Sion: and unto thee shall the vow be performed.
Praise
21:13; 115:1,2
waiteth
Heb. is silent.
62:1
in Sion
76:2; 78:68,69; 1 Chronicles 11:7; 15:29; 16:41,42; 25:1-31; Revelation 14:1-3
unto
56:12; 76:11; 116:17

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-65.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Psalm 65:1

"What mighty praise, O God, belongs to you in Zion. We will fulfill our vows to you." Psalm 65:1

What a sweet thing it is to bless and praise God! There is no feeling upon earth equal to it. But how often are we in that state when we can neither pray nor praise, when sullenness, frowardness, and peevishness seem to take such complete possession, that, so far from praising God, there is no power even to seek his face; and so far from blessing him, there are even dreadful things working up in the heart against him, which awfully manifest the enmity of the carnal mind. Those who are painfully exercised with such feelings are certain, therefore, that it is God"s work to enable them to praise and bless his holy name.

And does not the heaven-taught soul come sometimes into this spot, "O that the Lord would give me something to praise him for, would bring me out of this trial, break this wretched snare, remove this dreadful temptation, lift me out of this providential difficulty, bless and water my soul, comfort my heart, strengthen my spirit, give me some sweet testimony of his covenant love!" "O," says the soul, "how I would then bless and praise him! I would spend all my breath in exalting his holy name."

But when the Lord withholds from the soul the blessings it so eagerly covets, it can only look at them at a great distance, view them wishfully, and long to experience them. But it says, "Until they come with power, until they are brought in with sweetness, until they are sealed upon my very heart, so as to take full possession of my breast, I cannot, I dare not, bless and praise God"s holy name."

O what a dependent creature a heaven-taught soul is! How it hangs upon the Spirit of God to work in it that which is well-pleasing in his sight; how convinced it is that it cannot feel sin nor confess it, that it cannot breathe forth prayer nor praise unless the "God of all grace" create by his own powerful hand these blessed fruits of the lips ( Isaiah 57:19). Are you so helpless in your feelings as this? Are you such complete dependents upon sovereign grace? Then you are spiritually taught of God; for it is God"s teaching in the soul which brings a man to an experimental knowledge of his own complete helplessness before him.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Psalms 65:1". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/psalms-65.html.

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