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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 65:13

 

 

The meadows are clothed with flocks And the valleys are covered with grain; They shout for joy, yes, they sing.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The pastures are clothed with flocks - Cattle are seen in every plain, avenue, and vista, feeding abundantly; and the valleys are clothed, and wave with the richest harvests; and transports of joy are heard every where in the cheerful songs of the peasantry, the singing of the birds, the neighing of the horse, the lowing of the ox, and the bleating of the sheep. Claudian uses the same image: -

Viridis amictus montium.

"The green vesture of the mountains."

Shout for joy, they also sing - They are not loud and unmeaning sounds, they are both music and harmony in their different notes; all together form one great concert, and the bounty of God is the subject which they all celebrate. What an inimitable description! And yet the nervous Hebrew is not half expressed, even by the amended translation and paraphrase above.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-65.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The pastures are clothed with flocks - The flocks stand so thick together, and are spread so far, that they seem to be a clothing for the pasture; or, the fields are entirely covered with them.

The valleys also are covered over with corn - With grain. That is, the parts of the land - the fertile valleys - which are devoted to tillage. They are covered over, or clothed with waving grain, as the pasture-fields are with flocks.

They shout for joy, they also sing - They seem to be full of joy and happiness. What a beautiful image is this! How well does it express the loveliness of nature; how appropriately does it describe the goodness of God! Everything seems to be happy; to be full of song; and all this is to be traced to the goodness of God, as it all serves to express that goodness. Strange that there should be an atheist in such a world as this; - strange that there should be an unhappy man; - strange that amidst such beauties, while all nature joins in rejoicing and praise - pastures, cultivated fields, valleys, hills - there can be found a human being who, instead of uniting in the language of joy, makes himself miserable by attempting to cherish the feeling that God is not good!


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-65.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The pastures are clothed with flocks,.... Of sheep, which are so thick, that there is scarce anything to be seen upon the pastures but them; which look as if they were clothed with them: these may intend the multitude of converts, signified by the flocks of Kedar, and rams of Nebaioth; which gathering about the church, and joining to her, she clothes herself with them as with an ornament, Isaiah 60:7 it may be rendered the "rams clothe", or "cover, the flocks"F19כרים κριοι, Sept. "arietes", V. L. ; or the flocks are clothed, or covered, with the rams, as expressive of their copulation with them; and so the Targum,

"the rams ascend upon the flocks;'

which sense is favoured by the Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, Ethiopic, and Arabic versions;

the valleys also are covered over with corn; being made very fruitful with the rain, and bringing forth in great abundance; so humble souls are the most fruitful ones;

they shout for joy, they also sing; that is, the pastures, hills, and valleys, being laden with all kind of fruit for the use of man and beast, for necessity and pleasure, which occasion joy to the inhabitants of the earth: this may be expressive of the joy that will be among men, when the interest of Christ will be in a more flourishing condition in the latter day; see Isaiah 49:13.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-65.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, l they also sing.

(l) That is, the dumb creatures will not only rejoice for a time for God's benefits, but will continually sing.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-65.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, they also sing.

Sing — They are abundantly satisfied with thy goodness, and in their manner sing forth the praise of their benefactor.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-65.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 65:13 The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, they also sing.

Ver. 13. The pastures, &c.] Here is stately rhetoric all along.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-65.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

MY soul, I charge it upon thee, by the outgoings of the morning and the evening, that in those constant recurrences of day and night, thou wait in the silence of the most awakened meditation, for goings forth in praise and prayer, in humblings and rejoicings, before the mercy-seat of God in Christ. Say, my soul, canst thou really, truly, heartily, sincerely, adopt this language - praise waited for thee, my God, in Zion? Canst thou look up to thy Jesus, and say, Oh! thou that hearest prayer, to thee do I come?

Blessed God and Father, help me to adore thee, to love thee, to praise thee, for thy gracious choice of Jesus as my Surety. Never, surely, heavenly Lord, didst thou manifest thy grace and love to our poor fallen nature by any act of mercy equal to that, in which thou didst set up thine Holy One to approach unto thee as our glorious Mediator. Oh! for grace to choose him whom God hath chosen, to love him whom God hath loved, and to trust him with our salvation, into whose almighty hands God the Father hath committed all his glory. Lord, make this, I beseech thee, a daily evidence of my interest in Jesus, and of my walking with him. Then, Lord, shall I be satisfied with the goodness of thine house. Precious will be thy sabbaths, thy word, thine ordinances, thy people; all, all that belong to Jesus, will be precious to my soul. Yes, my soul will sit down at the fountain-head of enjoyment, in feasting upon the body and blood of my Lord; thy covenant grace, thy love, thy righteousness, will be a perpetual feast of fat things while here below, until thou shalt call me from the church below to the church above, to the everlasting enjoyment of thy presence in glory forever.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-65.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

This is added as the effect of these comfortable rains, that they fill the pastures with grass for cattle, and the valleys (which he mentions as the most fruitful places, though he doth not exclude the rest) with corn for the use of man.

They shout for joy, they also sing, i.e. they are abundantly satisfied with thy goodness, and in their manner sing forth the praises and declare the goodness of their Creator and Benefactor. Compare Psalms 147:8. Such passions or actions as these are oft figuratively ascribed to lifeless creatures, both in sacred and profane poetical writings; which are said to rejoice or mourn, &c, when their condition is such as calls for rejoicing or mourning, and would cause them to do so, if they were capable of such actions


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-65.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. Pastures—The word properly means sheep, young sheep: but in Isaiah 30:23 it must take the sense of pasture. So here the connexion imposes the same sense, only the idea is sheepwalk. The sheepwalk shall be clothed with sheep. The mountains and uplands of Palestine begin to appear brown and barren as early as June, for want of moisture.

The valleys—Contrasted with the upland downs or sheepwalks. As the latter are clothed with sheep, so are these with corn—all kinds of edible grain. And in this richness of divine blessing animals and inanimate nature shout for joy, yea, they also will sing.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-65.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 65:13. The pastures — Which were bare before; are clothed with flocks As they are with grass. They are so well stocked that they seem covered over with sheep and cattle, feeding or resting in them; the valleys also are covered with corn — So that the face of the earth cannot be seen for the abundance of it. He mentions valleys, or low grounds, as being generally most fruitful, but does not intend to exclude other places. Such are some of the good effects of these refreshing, fertilizing rains. They shout for joy: they also sing — They are abundantly satisfied with thy goodness, and, in their manner, sing forth the praises, and declare the goodness of their great Creator and Benefactor.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-65.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

To the chief Musician. See App-64.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-65.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, they also sing.
pastures
104:24-28; Zechariah 9:17; Acts 14:17
they shout
96:11-13; 98:7-9; Isaiah 35:1,2,10; 52:9; 55:12; Jeremiah 48:33

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-65.html.

The conclusion is Psalms 65:13. The flocks are clad with lambs and the valleys are clothed with corn; they shout for joy and sing. The flocks are clad with lambs, i.e. are rich in them. The blessing of God manifests itself in the increase of the flocks, which find rich nourishment in the pasture fertilized by the rain. On כרים only lambs, not pasture, comp. Psalms 37:20. Against the sense of pasture, we have particularly the article in הצאן. If this were in the accusative, and thus like בר, it would, like the latter word, without the article, or בר also would have the article:—all the more, as the article in that case would mark out the flocks in opposition to the corn. The second clause of the (Psalms 65:12) 12th verse shows, that the subject of both the two last verbs is the "valleys"—(not men sing). The reference, however, to the title and to Psalms 65:8, shows that the song of the valleys does not come from themselves, but from the joyful men who inhabit them. The אף stands, as in Psalms 18:48, only as a particle of connection. Psalms 60:8, and Psalms 108:9, shew that the Hithpa רוע means simply to "shout for joy."


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Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Psalms 65:13". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-65.html.

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