corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 65:4

 

 

How blessed is the one whom You choose and bring near to You To dwell in Your courts. We will be satisfied with the goodness of Your house, Your holy temple.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest - This is spoken in reference to the priests who were chosen of God to minister at the tabernacle; and who were permitted to approach, draw nigh, to the Divine Majesty by the various offerings and sacrifices which they presented.

We shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house - Though we are not priests, and have not the great felicity to minister before thee in holy things; yet we can worship at thy temple, feel the outpouring of thy Spirit, and be made happy with the blessings which thou dispensest there to thy true worshippers.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-65.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest - That is, Happy is the man; or, “Oh, the happiness of the man whom thou dost thus permit to approach thee.” The construction here in the Hebrew is the same as in Psalm 1:1. See the notes at that passage. The word choosest refers to the fact that true piety regards all such blessings as the result of the divine favor; the fruit of his electing grace and love. Compare the notes at Ephesians 1:3-4; notes at 1 Peter 1:2-3. We approach God with confidence, with the spirit of true worshippers, with the spirit of his children, only as he inclines us to him, and calls us to partake of his favor. Compare John 6:44.

And causest to approach unto thee - That is, that he may worship thee. The idea is here recognized in the word “causest,” that it is only by a divine influence that people are led to worship God. The cause - the efficient reason - why any man worships his Maker at all, is to be found in God himself. This idea is fairly implied in the form of the word as it is used in the Hebrew.

That he may dwell in thy courts - That is, either temporarily for the purpose of worship; or permanently, that he may serve thee in the sanctuary. See Psalm 23:6, note; Psalm 27:4, note. Compare Psalm 15:1. The word “courts” refers properly to the area around the tabernacle or the temple, and not to the tabernacle or temple itself. The worship of the people was offered in those courts, and not in the tabernacle or temple. See the notes at Matthew 21:12.

We shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house - Our souls will find thus what they need; what they long for. See the notes at Psalm 36:8. It is the nature of religion to satisfy the mind; that is, the soul finds in religion what meets its needs, for religion leaves no necessity of its nature unsupplied. It may be added that nothing else will do this but religion. The word “house” here denotes a place where God dwells, and it might be applied to the temple, as it often is in the Scriptures (compare Isaiah 2:3; Isaiah 56:7; Matthew 21:13; Mark 11:17; John 2:16; et al.); or to the tabernacle, before the temple was reared. Psalm 42:4; Matthew 12:4; Judges 18:31; Judges 20:18, Judges 20:26, Judges 20:31. The reference here is to the tabernacle or tent which David reared on Mount Zion, and where the worship of God was celebrated before the temple was built. “Even of thy holy temple.” The word “temple” is most commonly applied in the Scriptures to the structure which Solomon built for the worship of God; and it is on the ground that the Word is usually so applied, that DeWette and others have argued that this psalm could not have been written by David, but that it was composed after the temple was reared. But the word rendered “temple” - היכל hêykâl - is a word of so general a character that it may be applied to any house erected for the worship of God. It is not unfrequently applied to the tabernacle. See the notes at Psalm 5:7. This psalm, therefore, may have been composed while the tabernacle was standing, and before the temple was built, and hence, may have been composed by David, as the title intimates.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-65.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 65:4

Blessed is the man whom Thou choosest, and causest to approach unto Thee, that he may dwell in Thy courts.

Worship

This psalm includes a thanksgiving for God’s bounties in Providence, for the beauties of spring, and the natural supply of man’s wants; but the privileges of the sanctuary are here made a special subject of grateful acknowledgment.

I. The psalmist here commends public worship--

1. As a peculiar privilege. “Blessed is the man whom Thou choosest and causest to approach unto Thee.” The opportunity of enjoying such an approach is not given to all, but brings special responsibility to those to whom God grants it.

2. As an approach unto God. God is never far from us, but when we meet in His courts we are able more distinctly to realize His nearness to us. We often have a deep and glad sense of His presence.

3. As the finding a new home. “That he may dwell in Thy courts.” There may be a reference here, as in other psalms, to the Levites who literally dwelt there that they might attend to the performances of the services; but the latter part of this verse implies that David claimed for himself a share in the privilege. The thought is--“we, as dwellers in the courts of the Lord, shall be satisfied.”

4. As an abundant provision. Here the wants both of the mind and of the heart are met.

5. As a holy service.

II. General remarks on public worship.

1. It is valuable for testimony. Christians thus witness for Christ, and confess their faith.

2. For its associations. What memories cluster round the sanctuaries where we have worshipped I

3. For communion ‘with one another. Thus we are helped by association one with the other in the various acts of worship.

4. For the worship itself in its various parts--prayer, instruction, praise. Then, let us not forsake the assembling of ourselves together, and let us seek to make the highest use of the ordinances of religion. (Anon.)

The blessedness of approaching to God

Who is the happiest man? The miser says, Blessed is the man whose corn and wine are increased, The sensualist says, Blessed is he who has no Lord over him, and who walks after the ways of his heart, and the sight of his eyes, without the least control from any laws, human or divine. The ambitious man says, Blessed is he who is highest in favour at court; who is admitted to the confidence of his prince. But, “Blessed is the man,” says David (and so says every Christian), “whom Thou choosest, and causest to approach unto Thee.”

I. Explain the nature of this approach to God.

1. Consider what it is not. It is not bowing the knee, and saying a prayer, and putting on an appearance of seriousness at particular times; it is not going often to the house of the Lord, and coming and sitting before Him as His people; the humble, self-condemned publican, that stood afar off, approached nearer to God than the Pharisee, though he confidently pushed forward to the holy of holies. To approach Him is an act of the mind, not of the body. God is a spirit, and they that worship Him acceptably, must do it not merely with a bended knee, and a loud voice, and an uplifted eye, or a head hanging down like a bulrush. These things are comparatively indifferent; if unaccompanied with sincerity, they are worse than indifferent; they are offensive and abominable to God, who will be worshipped in spirit and in truth.

II. In what does the blessedness of approaching to God consist? In the honour, the pleasure, the profit we enjoy.

III. The hindrances to such approach.

1. Sin, this destroys our communion with God until we repent and return to Him.

2. The world.

3. Satan. (S. Lavington.)

The happiness of saints

The saints of God are blessed--

I. In feeling the joys of devotion.

II. In obtaining the forgiveness of sin.

III. In finding a retreat from affliction.

IV. In the anticipation of a better world. As the mariner who has been long tossed on a troubled ocean, or detained in a foreign country, is desirous to revisit his native shore, and, when he first discovers the hoary rocks of the green isle rising with rugged grandeur above the waves, his eye beams with joy; so the saint who has been sojourning many a tedious year in a waste howling desert, pants to behold the beauty of paradise, and darts his eye radiant with rapture towards the delightful abode. (T. Laurie, D. D.)

The blessedness of approaching to God

I. What is meant by approaching to God. There was a time when the Lord came down and conversed with man, as one friend does with another, when no thunder, and lightning, and tempest accompanied him, and when no conscious guilt inspired the human breast with terror; and a time will come again, dark and disconsolate though our condition now be, when the veil shall be removed, and we shall so behold the glory of the Lord, as to be completely changed into the same image. Now, sin interposes a dark cloud betwixt us and our God, so that we can have but a very imperfect view of His glory and majesty. “We see as through a glass darkly.” There are seasons, however, when the Christian is admitted, as it were, within the veil, when he sees the King in His beauty, and enjoys that delightful communion with Him, which is a foretaste of the heavenly bliss.

II. Wherein the happiness of approaching to God consists.

1. It is the highest honour; far superior to every dignity, an honour compared to which all the pomp and splendour of earthly greatness dwindle into insignificance.

2. It is a pleasure. God is the chief good. He is the source of life, and joy, and happiness. To go, therefore, to Him, and draw our enjoyments pure from the fountain from which they flow, must be peculiarly gratifying to every person who can properly distinguish between good and evil.

3. It is highly profitable.

III. Obstacles that prevent our approaching to God.

1. The corruption of our own heart. This may be regarded as the first and greatest of all, because while this continues unsubdued, we cannot advance a single step in our journey to heaven; whereas, if this be overcome, none of the rest will be able to obstruct our progress.

2. The world.

3. Another obstacle in the way of our approaching to God, is Satan. He is the deceiver and the destroyer.

Lessons--

1. They who do not approach to God will perish.

2. The value of the privilege we possess, of approaching to God in the ways of His appointment.

3. It is only through the mediation of Jesus Christ that we can approach to God. (John Ramsay, M. A.)

Delight in the presence of God

A nervous clergyman, who could only compose to advantage when absolutely alone and undisturbed, left his door unlocked, and his little three-year-old child softly opened the door and came in. He was disturbed, and a little impatiently asked, “My child, what do you want?” “Nothing, papa.” “Then what do you come in here for?” “Just because I wanted to be with you,” was the reply. To come into God’s presence and wait before Him, wanting nothing but to be with Him--how such an hour now and again would rest us.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 65:4". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-65.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest,.... In eternity; both to grace and glory; for such have true faith in Christ given them, called the faith of God's elect, and shall never perish: they are effectually called by the grace of God, and are justified by the righteousness of Christ, and shall be glorified; or in time, for there is a choice in time, as the fruit, effect, and evidence of the eternal choice, and is no other than effectual calling; see John 15:19, 1 Corinthians 1:26; and happy are those who are both chosen and called; both election and the effectual calling are to grace and glory, and spring from the good will and pleasure of God; and the Targum in the king of Spain's Bible is,

"blessed is the man in whom thou art well pleased;'

and causest to approach unto thee; the same Targum supplies,

"unto the fear of thee;'

or unto thy fear and worship. The persons whom God has chosen for himself are, in their state of nature, at a distance from him by reason of sin; and through the blood and sacrifice of Christ, by which atonement is made, they are brought nigh to him; and in the faith of Christ the Mediator, their hearts are engaged to approach unto God, and come with boldness to his throne, and ask grace and mercy of him; and through the grace of Christ they have nearness to him, and communion with him, Ephesians 2:18;

that he may dwell in thy courts; or "he shall dwell"F12ישכן "habitabit", Pagninus, Montanus, Tigurine version, Musculus. ; the man that is chosen of God, and brought nigh by Christ; he shall not only come into the house of God, and tread in his courts, but he shall dwell there, ever abide, and never go out;

we shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house; even all that are like this man, chosen by the grace of God, redeemed by the blood of Christ, brought into the house of God, and have a place and a name there, better than that of sons and daughters of men: by "the house" of God we are to understand the church of God; and by "the goodness" of it the provisions of grace in it, the word and ordinances, and the blessings of grace held forth in them, and especially Christ the bread of life, whose flesh is meat indeed, and whose blood is drink indeed; of which true believers may eat, and do to full satisfaction; and blessed are they that have such food, and appetites for it, and are filled with it. The Targum paraphrases it,

"the righteous shall say, we shall be satisfied with the goodness of shy house.'

It follows,

even of thy holy temple: which means the same as the house of God; namely, the church; see Ephesians 2:21. Some, as Aben Ezra observes, interpret it, "thou Holy One in thy temple"; as if it was an address to God, and a description of him as in his temple.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-65.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

[and] satisfied with the goodness … temple — denote communion with God (Psalm 15:1; Psalm 23:6; compare Psalm 5:7). This is a blessing for all God‘s people, as denoted by the change of number.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-65.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and causest to approach unto thee, that he may dwell in thy courts: we shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house, even of thy holy temple.

Approach — To draw near to God in his house and ordinance, by prayer and praise, and other acts of communion with him.

Satisfied — With the blessings there conferred upon thy people, the favour and fellowship of God, remission of sins, renovation of heart and life, joy and peace, and well-grounded assurance of eternal life.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-65.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

4.Blessed is the man whom thou hast chosen Having already acknowledged that the people had separated themselves from God by their sins, and forfeited all right to be heard, he now takes refuge in the free grace of God, which secures the remission of sin amongst other blessings. He thus casts an additional light upon what he had said on the point of guilt being purged away, by pointing to the cause of God, as being favorable to poor sinners, which can only be found in his fatherly love leading him to welcome them into his presence, however undeserving. That pardon which we daily receive flows from our adoption, and on it also are all our prayers founded. How could the sinner venture into the sight of God, to obtain reconciliation with him, were he not persuaded of his being a Father? In the words before us, David does not speak of the grace of God as reaching to the Gentiles, (which he had done in a preceding part of the psalm,) but in terms which apply only to the times in which he wrote. The Church of God was confined to the Jews, and they only were admitted into the sanctuary; whereas now, when the distinction has been abolished, and other nations called to the same privilege, we are all at liberty to approach him with familiarity. Christ is our peace, (Ephesians 2:14,) who has united in one those who were far off, and those who were nigh.

What has been now said may show at once the scope of the Psalmist. The Church and chosen people of God being in possession of the promise of the remission of sin, he calls those blessed whom God has included within that number, and introduced into the enjoyment of such a distinguished privilege. His language intimates, that the election did not at that time terminate upon all; for he insists upon it as the special prerogative of the Jews, that they had been chosen by God in preference to the other nations. Were it supposed that man could do anything to anticipate the grace of God, the election would cease to be with God himself, although the right and power of it are expressly ascribed to him. (450) But the Jews had no excellency above others, except in the one point of having enjoyed the distinguishing favor of God. The middle wall of partition is now broken down, that the Gentiles might be called in. It is evident, however, that all are not alike called; and observation proves the ignorance of those who will assert that the grace of God is extended to all in common, without any choice exerted on his part. Can any reason be imagined why God should not call all alike, except it be that his sovereign election distinguishes some from others? Faith and prayer may be means for procuring us an interest in the grace of God; but the source whence it flows is not within but without us. (451) There is a blessedness in exercising trust upon God, and embracing his promises — a blessedness experienced when, through faith in Christ the Mediator, we apprehend him as our Father, and direct our prayers to him in that character; — but ere this faith and prayer can have any existence, it must be supposed that we who are estranged from God by nature have been brought near by an exercise of his favor. We are near him, not as having anticipated his grace, and come to him of ourselves, but because, in his condescension, he has stretched out his hand as far as hell itself to reach us. To speak more properly, he first elects us, and then testifies his love by calling us. It is noticeable, also, that though God separated the seed of Abraham to be a peculiar people, entitled as the circumcision to a place in his temple, there can be no question that David recognised a distinction even amongst those who were Jews, all not having been the subjects of God’s effectual calling, nor yet properly entitled to a place in his temple. The Psalmist alludes, indeed, to the outward sanctuary, when he speaks of the Jews as chosen to approach God; but we must remember (what was brought under our attention, Psalms 15:1 and Psalms 24:3) that all were not real members of the Church who trod the court of the temple, but that the great qualifications necessary were the pure heart and the clean hands. Accordingly, we must understand by those brought near to God, such as present themselves before him in the exercise of genuine faith, and not such as merely occupy a place in his temple as to outward appearance. But, again, the being chosen, and the being called to approach God, are two things mentioned here together, to correct any such vain idea as that the sheep of God’s flock are allowed to wander at will for any length of time, and not brought into the fold. (452) This is one way by which our gratuitous adoption is evidenced, that we come to the sanctuary under the leading of the Holy Spirit.

The Psalmist insists upon the fruit springing out of the blessed privilege of which he had spoken, when he adds, that believers would be satisfied with the fullness of his temple. Hypocrites may go there, but they return empty and unsatisfied as to any spiritual blessing enjoyed. It is noticeable, that the person is changed in this part of the verse, and that David associates himself with other believers, preferring to speak upon this subject from personal experience. We are not to understand that believers are fully replenished with the goodness of God at any one moment; it is conveyed to them gradually; but while the influences of the Spirit are thus imparted in successive measures, each of them is enriched with a present sufficiency, till all be in due time advanced to perfection. I might remark here, that while it is true, as stated, (Psalms 103:5,) that “God satisfieth our mouth with good things,” at the same time it is necessary to remember what is said elsewhere, “Open thy mouth, and I will fill it.” Our contracted desires is the reason why we do not receive a more copious supply of blessings from God; he sees that we are straitened in ourselves, and accommodates the communications of his goodness to the measure of our expectations. By specifying particularly the goodness of the sanctuary, the Psalmist passes an implied commendation upon the outward helps which God has appointed for leading us into the enjoyment of heavenly blessings. In these former times God could have directly stretched out his hand from heaven to supply the wants of his worshippers, but saw fit to satisfy their souls by means of the doctrine of the law, sacrifices, and other rites and external aids to piety. Similar are the means which he employs in the Church still; and though we are not to rest in these, neither must we neglect them.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-65.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 65:4 Blessed [is the man whom] thou choosest, and causest to approach [unto thee, that] he may dwell in thy courts: we shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house, [even] of thy holy temple.

Ver. 4. Blessed is the man whom thou choosest] Whom thou choosest for thy love, and then lovest him for thy choice.

And causest to approach unto thee] i.e. Effectually callest. Here vocation is fetched from the fountain (as is also justification in the former verse), viz. God’s free election. See that golden chain, Romans 8:30.

That he may dwell in thy courts] viz. To bear thy word, and partake of thine ordinances. For our Saviour telleth the Jews, He that is of God heareth God’s words; ye therefore hear him not, because ye are not of God, John 8:4; our worship scorners, then, have a black brand upon them.

We shall be satisfied] He maketh himself one of the number of God’s elect (as Paul also doth often), and therehence concludeth to himself and the rest a beatifical communion of all good things.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-65.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 65:4. The man whom thou choosest He felicitates the happy lot of the priests who had near and constant access to God; and he adds, We shall be satisfied, &c. i.e. "Though we cannot all enjoy that privilege; yet we are all permitted to taste and partake of the sacrifices of thanksgiving, which are offered to thee in thy house for the benefits that we have received from thee." See Psalms 36:8.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-65.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Methinks, I could spend hours on this precious, precious verse, and when I had pondered over the sweet contents of it again and again, it should still be opening new subjects of praise. Reader! who can this man be that is here said to be blessed, but the God-man, the Wisdom man, Christ Jesus? For who but He ever engaged his heart to approach unto Jehovah? Or whom did Jehovah choose to approach unto him, but the man God's fellow? Examine some of those very blessed scriptures, which explain this most glorious doctrine, before you prosecute the other parts of this verse: Psalms 89:19; Hebrews 1:6, etc. Jeremiah 30:21; Zechariah 13:7, etc. And while we thus behold Christ Jesus, as the man of Jehovah's choice, to approach unto him as our surety, our sponsor, our representative; shall we not be satisfied with the greatness of his salvation, and feel the full enjoyment of that unspeakable promise, Men shall be blessed in him, and all nations shall call him blessed? Reader! what saith your heart to these things? Will you not join issue with this precious verse, and say, Blessed is the man, blessed be the Godman, the glory-man, Christ Jesus, the elect, the beloved, the chosen of Jehovah, whom God the Father causeth to approach unto him as the glorious Head, and Redeemer, and Mediator of his people? Yes, we shall be satisfied, yea, abundantly satisfied in him, and with him. Yes, thou Holy One of God! thou, even thou alone, shalt choose our inheritance for us, whom God our Father hath chosen to be our Redeemer. Psalms 47:4.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-65.html. 1828.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 603

THE BLESSEDNESS OF WAITING UPON GOD

Psalms 65:4. Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and causest to approach unto thee, that he may dwell in thy courts: we shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house, even of thy holy temple.

THE connexion between duty and happiness, though not seen by the generality of men, is certain. It may not presently appear: but it will approve itself, at last, to all who will wait for the issue of passing events. To the ungodly man it seems a drudgery to wait upon God: but to every humble and believing suppliant it will be found a source of unbounded bliss; so at least the Psalmist affirms in the words before us; from which we shall take occasion to notice,

I. The habit of God’s chosen people—

It is the delight of every true Christian to approach unto his God—

[He feels, like the Psalmist, that “iniquity has prevailed against him” to a very fearful extent: but he sees that an all-sufficient atonement has been offered for him; and that, through the blood of Christ once shed on Calvary, “every transgression that he has ever committed may be purged away [Note: ver. 3.].” Hence he approaches God with all humility as a sinner, and with all earnestness, as one that desires mercy at his hands — — — Nor is it on some particular occasions only that his people draw nigh to him. They resemble the priests of old, whose apartments were in the temple, round about the sanctuary; and who therefore “dwelt in his courts:” for, in the habit of their minds at least, “they dwell in God” by meditation and prayer; and “God dwells in them” by the abiding influence of his Spirit and grace — — —]

And to this is he brought by the mighty working of the power of God—

[It is not by any natural power that the saints draw nigh unto God. Of themselves, they would flee from God, even as our first parents did in Paradise. It is “God himself who draws them [Note: John 6:44.],” and who from all eternity “chose them” to this high honour. They are unto the Lord “an holy priesthood [Note: 1 Peter 2:9.];” and what God said to Eli may, in a spiritual sense, be applied to them; “Did I plainly appear unto the house of thy father, when they were in Egypt, in Pharaoh’s house? and did I choose him out of all the tribes of Israel to be my priest, to offer upon mine altar, to burn incense, to wear an ephod before me? and did I give unto the house of thy father all the offerings made by fire of the children of Israel? Yes, I did [Note: 1 Samuel 2:27-28.]:” and in like manner has God chosen from eternity, and “set apart for himself” in time, all those who by “a spirit of grace and of supplication” approach unto him [Note: Psalms 4:3. Zechariah 12:10.]. Hence it is, and hence alone, that they are “a people near unto him [Note: Psalms 148:14.].”]

And it is not without reason that David declares,

II. Their blessedness resulting from it.

The terms in which he states this, convey the idea most richly to our minds—

[The priests, whilst serving at the altar, “partook of the altar,” and “lived of the altar.” See the particular account, as stated by Moses. “The Lord spake unto Aaron, Behold, I also have given thee the charge of mine heave-offerings of all the hallowed things of the children of Israel; unto thee have I given them, by reason of the anointing, and to thy sons, by an ordinance for ever. This shall be thine of the most holy things, reserved from the fire: every oblation of theirs, every meat-offering of theirs, and every sin-offering of theirs, and every trespass-offering of theirs, which they shall render unto me, shall be most holy for thee, and for thy sons. In the most holy place shalt thou eat it; every male shall eat it: it shall be holy unto thee. And this is thine: the heave-offering of their gift, with all the wave-offerings of the children of Israel: I have given them unto thee, and to thy sons, and to thy daughters with thee, by a statute for ever; every one that is clean in thy house shall eat of it. All the best of the oil, and all the best of the wine, and of the wheat, the first-fruits of them, which they shall offer unto the Lord, them have I given thee. And whatsoever is first ripe in the land, which they shall bring unto the Lord, shall be thine; every one that is clean in thine house shall eat of it. Every thing devoted in Israel shall be thine [Note: Numbers 18:8-14.].” Let this be noticed; and it will be seen that the priests of old were richly provided for, and well sustained by the fatness of God’s house.]

And here we see indeed the blessedness of waiting upon God—

[God’s people, now, are “priests unto their God [Note: Revelation 1:6.].” And this is the sustenance which, in a spiritual sense, is provided for them. Mark the wonderful correspondence between the Prophet Jeremiah, when describing the times of the Gospel, and Moses, in the fore-cited passage, declaring the ordinances of the Law: “They shall come and sing in the height of Zion, and shall flow together to the goodness of the Lord, for wheat, and for wine, and for oil, and for the young of the flock and of the herd: and their soul shall be as a watered garden, and they shall not sorrow any more at all . And I will satiate the soul of the priests with fatness; and my people shall be satisfied with my goodness, saith the Lord [Note: Jeremiah 31:12; Jeremiah 31:14.].” Who does not see in this the accomplishment of my text? In communion with God, the souls of men are filled as with marrow and fatness, whilst their mouth praiseth him with joyful lips [Note: Psalms 63:5.]. “And in the communications which they receive from him, they are abundantly satisfied with the fatness of his house; and he makes them to drink of the river of his pleasures [Note: Psalms 36:7-8.].” In truth, no tongue can declare, no imagination can conceive, the full extent of those benefits which men obtain by waiting upon God: for “the riches that they obtain are unsearchable;” their “peace passeth all understanding;” and their “joy is unspeakable and glorified.”]

See, then, I pray you, Brethren,

1. How different is the issue of men’s different pursuits!—

[Is the worldling ever thus replenished to satiety? Never. He grasps a shadow: and “in the midst of his sufficiency he is in straits [Note: Job 20:22.]” — — — But the true Christian finds in his God all that his soul can desire: and “drinking of the water that Christ gives him, he never thirsts again” for any thing that this vain world can afford [Note: John 4:14.] — — —]

2. What a preparation for heaven is the Christian’s employment upon earth!

[It is the delight of the Christian to draw nigh to God, and to offer to him the sacrifices of prayer and praise. And what, I pray you, are they doing in heaven? The only difference is, that here they pour forth their prayers under the influence of hope; but there, their one sacrifice is praise, called forth without ceasing, under a sense of complete, uninterrupted fruition.

Let, then, every soul amongst you adopt the habit of holy David: “One thing have I desired of the Lord, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the Lord, and to inquire in his temple [Note: Psalms 27:4.].”]


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/psalms-65.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou choosest, out of the lump of mankind, to be one of thy peculiar people.

Causest, i.e. permittest and commandest, and by the disposal of thy providence, and the influences of thy grace, procurest and orderest.

To approach unto thee; to draw near to God in his house and ordinances by prayer and praises, and other acts of acquaintance and communion with him.

In thy courts; in the courts of thy house. He mentioneth courts, because the people were permitted to go no further into God’s house.

Shall be satisfied; for they only get that solid satisfaction which all men desire, but no other persons or people can find elsewhere.

With the goodness of thy house; with the spiritual and everlasting blessings there conferred upon thy people, the grace, and favour, and fellowship of God, remission of sins, renovation of heart and life, the knowledge of God, and of ourselves, and of our duty and true interest, joy, and peace, and well-grounded hopes or assurance of eternal life; in comparison whereof all the enjoyments of this world are but dross and dung.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-65.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4. Whom thou choosest—See Psalms 4:3.

Causest to approach… thee—A priestly honour under the law, (Numbers 16:8,) but offered now to all. (Hebrews 10:19-22.)

Satisfied with the goodness of thy house—To be “satisfied” with God’s gifts and favour, so that the heart gratefully rests there, is the highest return we can make to him; while to profess his name and still seek our pleasure in the world is the greatest reproach to him and to the religion we profess.

Thy holy temple—The word is simply synonymous with the terms “thy courts” and “thy house” in this same verse, and is no proof that this psalm was of later date than David’s time. See its use in 1 Samuel 1:9; 1 Samuel 3:3, where it applies to the tabernacle.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-65.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 65:4. Blessed is the man — The particular person, how poor and mean soever; whom thou choosest — To be one of thy peculiar people; and causest — That is, permittest and commandest; and by the disposal of thy providence, and the influence of thy grace, inclinest and enablest, to approach unto thee — To draw near to thee in thy house and ordinances, by prayer and praise, and other acts of communion with thee. That he may dwell in thy courts — In the courts of thy house; may frequently resort thither, and wait upon thee there, at all opportunities, among thy people. He mentions courts, because the people were permitted to go no further into God’s house. We shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house — We shall enjoy solid satisfaction, such as all men desire, but which only thy true and genuine people obtain, in those spiritual and everlasting blessings there conferred upon them, namely, thy grace, and favour, and fellowship with thee. Observe, reader! remission of sins, renovation of heart and life, the knowledge of God and of ourselves, and of our duty and true interest, joy and peace through believing, with well-grounded hopes of eternal life, are the blessings included in the goodness of God’s house, or holy temple, which is here mentioned, in comparison of which all the enjoyments of this world are but dross and dung.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-65.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Blessed = Happy. Figure of speech Beatitudo. App-63.

Thou choosest. Only those whom He calls can truly worship. See Leviticus 1:1, Leviticus 1:2.

courts. Not the temple courts, but David"s tabernacle on Zion.

holy. See note on Exodus 3:5.

temple. Hebrew. heykal = palace.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-65.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and causest to approach unto thee, that he may dwell in thy courts: we shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house, even of thy holy temple.

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and causest to approach unto thee. So Psalms 33:12 as to the blessedness of the nation chosen by the Lord; here the reference is to the individual man. Blessed is the man whom thou admittest into communion with thee. The temple-worship, wherein God admitted the covenant people into His immediate presence, was the visible pledge of this spiritual communion (Deuteronomy 4:7).

That he may dwell in thy courts - (Psalms 15:1; Psalms 84:4.) "Dwell" shows that the blessing belongs to the spiritual worshippers, who by faith, with sacrifices of prayer and praise, are continually, in heart, even when not in body, dwelling in the house of God (Psalms 27:4; Psalms 36:8; Exodus 19:4; Exodus 19:6).

We shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house - image from a rich feast provided by a munificent lord. So Psalms 63:5. Both the spiritual good things of God's house and the temporal blessings He gives to all the members of His family (Ephesians 2:19; Ephesians 3:15).

Even of thy holy temple. The holiness of the temple is the ground of the bestowal of such ample blessings (Psalms 46:4, end). See notes on Psalms 5:1-12 in explanation of the term "temple" applied to the tabernacle before the erection of Solomon's temple.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-65.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Blessed.—The ellipse of the relative is common enough (see Psalms 34:8, &c), but here the antecedent is wanting as well. Perhaps we ought to read, He whom thou choosest and bringest near shall dwell, &c

Courts.—From a root meaning to wall round; especially applied to the open space within the outer fence of the Tabernacle, or to the different courts of the Temple (Exodus 27:9; 1 Kings 6:36; 1 Kings 7:12).

We shall be satisfied.—Better, Let us be refreshed.

Thy holy temple.—Literally, The holy of thy temple, which might mean “the holiness of thy temple.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-65.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and causest to approach unto thee, that he may dwell in thy courts: we shall be satisfied with the goodness of thy house, even of thy holy temple.
Blessed
33:12; 84:4
choosest
4:3; 78:70,71; 106:4,5; 135:4; Ephesians 1:4; 2 Thessalonians 2:13
causest
15:1; 23:6; 24:7; Revelation 3:12
we shall be
17:15; 36:8; 63:5; Jeremiah 31:12-14,25; Revelation 7:16,17; 21:3,4

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 65:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-65.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology