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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 65:6

 

 

Who establishes the mountains by His strength, Being girded with might;

Adam Clarke Commentary

Setteth fast the mountains - It is by thy strength they have been raised, and by thy power they are girded about or preserved. He represents the mountains as being formed and pitched into their proper places by the mighty hand of God; and shows that they are preserved from splitting, falling down, or mouldering away, as it were, by a girdle by which they are surrounded. The image is very fine. They were hooped about by the Divine power.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-65.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains - Fixing them firm on their foundations. This is an exhibition of vast strength or power on the part of God, as if he fixed them so firm that they could not be moved - as if he handled with ease those vast masses of matter, with all their rocks and forests - and caused them to repose steadily and calmly on their foundations. We have few more exalted conceptions of the power of God than to suppose him lifting with ease a vast mountain; letting it down where he pleases, and settling it so firmly that it cannot be moved.

Being girded with power - That is, they seemed to be surrounded or encompassed with power, as a man girds himself up when he wishes to put forth a great effort of strength.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-65.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

GOD'S PREPARATION OF THE EARTH AS MAN'S DWELLING

"Who by his strength settest forth the mountains,

Being girded about with might;

Who stilleth the roaring of the seas,

The roaring of their waves,

And the tumult of the peoples.

They also that dwell in the uttermost parts are afraid of thy tokens:

Thou makest the outgoings of the morning and evening to rejoice.

Thou visitest the earth and waterest it,

Thou greatly enrichest it;

The river of God is full of water:

Thou providest them grain, when thou hast so prepared the earth."

The theme of these verses is God's marvelous preparation of the earth to be a suitable dwelling place for his human creation. Some writers include Psalms 65:9 with the following verses, which are usually understood to speak of an abundant harvest; but the statements that God enriches the earth, and that he has prepared it fit more properly into the far greater picture of God's special creation of the planet Earth as man's residence.

"His strength settest forth the mountains" (Psalms 65:6). Nothing provides any more evidence of the intelligence and love of God than his arrangement of the great mountain systems upon the five continents. These mountains actually are God's instruments for controlling the rainfall of all lands and the drainage system of the earth in its rivers.

"Stilling of the seas and the roaring of the waves" (Psalms 65:7). God's control of the seas is the sole factor that makes life on the earth possible. For example, if the moon were a hundred thousand miles closer to the earth, the tides would roar over all lands hundreds of feet deep twice a day!

Furthermore, if it were not for the great polar ice-caps, it is altogether possible that all habitable lands would be submerged.

God indeed controls the seas. Jesus rebuked the winds and the waves, and they heeded his voice.

Although only the mountains and oceans are mentioned here, they are merely metaphors standing for "all things" whatsoever.

If the percentage of oxygen in earth's atmosphere, for example, were significantly increased, a single match could produce devastating fires; and if it were significantly decreased, man would have to have a set of lungs the size of a bale of cotton! God prepared the earth for men to live upon it.

"And the tumult of the peoples" (Psalms 65:7). It is not a mistake that "the peoples" are here mentioned along with the seas and the mountains which God controls. God also controls all the peoples of the world. There is a sense in which the human population is a part of nature. He appoints the boundaries of their dwelling place, determines their seasons, giving ascendancy now to one group then to another. Paul mentions this in Acts 17:26. Moreover, this is no haphazard control; God has a purpose in his control of nations; and what is it? "That they should seek God" (Acts 17:27).

"Thou makest the outgoings of the morning and evening to rejoice" (Psalms 65:8). The word "thou" stands at the head of this verse, as it does in ten other lines of this psalm. The great theme throughout is God's power, glory and all-sufficiency.

The exact meaning of this statement is not certainly known, but we agree with Rawlinson's comment that, "The splendor of sunrise and sunset seem to be in the poet's mind."[9] This writer walked seven miles to school each day, which necessitated being on the way before sunrise; and truly, there is nothing on earth that speaks any more eloquently of the majesty and glory of the Creator than the magnificent wonders of the sunrise, the great pity being that so few see it every day.

Alexander Maclaren tells the story of an atheist who traveled in the desert with an Arab. One morning, the atheist said, "Arab, a camel circled our tent last night"! The Arab asked, "How do you know?" The atheist said, "Why, I can see its tracks, of course."

Then the Arab, who devoutly believed in God, pointed to the flaming glory of the sunrise in the eastern skies and said, "What a shame that you cannot also see the tracks of the Almighty God"! This shows how sinful men can find tracks of animals in the dirt but cannot see the footprints of the Eternal in his marvelous natural creation.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-65.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains,.... In the first creation and formation of them, when they were settled on their basis so firmly that they are rarely removed, and when they are it is something extraordinary. Some understand this of the Lord's preparing the mountains with the rain of his strength, for the bringing forth of herbs and grass for the service of man and beast, and of his adorning them with trees; and the Targum is,

"who preparest food for the wild goats of the mountains;'

others interpret them of kingdoms and communities, comparable to mountains, Jeremiah 51:25; but these are not set fast, they are not firm and stable, but in a course of time are removed, and give way to others; rather the church of God is meant; see Isaiah 2:2; where the same phrase is used as here; and "mountains" may signify particular churches, or indeed particular believers; for all that trust in the Lord are like to mountains, Psalm 125:1; and these are set fast in the everlasting love of God, by which their mountain is made to stand strong; in eternal election, which is the foundation of God that stands sure; in the covenant of grace, which is more immovable than hills and mountains; and on Christ the Rock, against whom the gates of hell can never prevail; and who are so established, settled, and kept by the power of God, that they cannot be removed by the most boisterous storms and winds of the world's persecutions, Satan's temptations, or their own sins and corruptions;

being girded with power: not the mountains, but God himself; whose power, like himself, is infinite, and appears in the works of his hands, of nature, providence, and grace: the allusion is to a mighty man girded for battle; or for the performance of great undertakings.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-65.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

6.By his strength setting fast the mountains For the sake of illustration, he instances the power of God seen in the general fabric of the world. In these times it sounded as a new and strange truth to say that the Gentiles should be called to the same hope with the Jews. To prove that it was not so incredible as they were apt to conceive, the Psalmist very properly adverts to the Divine power apparent in all parts of the world. He instances the mountains rather than the plains, because the immense masses of earth, and the lofty rocks which they present, convey a more impressive idea of the Godhead. Interpreters are not agreed as to the exact meaning of the verse which follows. Some think that the mark of similitude must be supplied before the first word of the sentence, and that it is meant to be said that God stills the tumults of men when raging in their insolent attempts, as he stills the agitations of the sea. Others understand the first part of the verse to be a metaphorical declaration of what is plainly stated in the close. I would take the words simply as they stand, and consider that in the first member of the verse, David adverts to the illustration of the divine power which we have in the sea, and in the second to that which we have in his operations amongst men. His strength is shown in calming the waves and tempestuous swellings of the ocean. It is put forth also in quelling tumults which may have been raised by the people.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-65.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 65:6 Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains; [being] girded with power:

Ver. 6. Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains] Why, then, should it seem incredible that he will do all manner of good to his elect, for whose sake he made all at first, and still upholdeth all by the word of his power? so he doth also states and kingdoms (oft compared to mountains in Scripture; see Jeremiah 51:25, Isaiah 13:2, Zechariah 4:7), that the Lord God might dwell among men, viz. in his Church and chosen people.

Being girded with power] With prevailing power, as the word signifieth.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-65.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Settest fast the mountains; that they are not overthrown by floods, or winds, or earthquakes, or other natural or violent causes; which stability they have only from God’s providence, which sustains all persons and all things.

Being girded with power; this our God being able to do it, and that with one single word.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-65.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

In him. God, (Haydock) Jesus, (Eusebius) or "on it," the river Euphrates, which we shall pass over with as much ease, as our ancestors did the Red Sea. So the prophets frequently speak in a figurative sense, Isaias xi. 16., and l. 3., and Zacharias x. 10., and 4 Esdras xiii. 41. (Calmet) --- As Josue led the Israelites across the river Jordan on dry land, (Haydock) so wel shall extol thy wonders. (Worthington) --- There, reflecting on these prodigies, both past and present, we shall rejoice. (Menochius)


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-65.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Which = Who.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-65.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Girded.—We see the Divine Architect of the world, girt for his labours in the Oriental fashion (see Note, Psalms 18:32), setting the mountains firm on their bases (comp. Psalms 75:3), the poet evidently thinking at the same time how empires, as well as mountains, owe their stability to God.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-65.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Which by his strength setteth fast the mountains; being girded with power:
Which
24:2; 119:90; Micah 6:2; Habakkuk 3:6
girded
93:1; 1 Samuel 2:4; Isaiah 51:9

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 65:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-65.html.

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