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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 65:7

 

 

Who stills the roaring of the seas, The roaring of their waves, And the tumult of the peoples.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Stilleth the noise of the seas - Thou art Sovereign over all the operation of sea and land. Earthquakes are under thy control: so are the flux and reflux of the sea; and all storms and tempests by which the great deep is agitated. Even the headstrong multitude is under thy control; for thou stillest the madness of the people.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-65.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Which stilleth the noise of the seas - He calms the seas when they have been agitated by the storm. He causes the mighty waves to settle down, and the whole surface of the ocean becomes calm and smooth. The storm subsides at his command, and the sea is still. It was the manifestation of this power which demonstrated so clearly the divinity of the Lord Jesus, when he said to the troubled waves, “Peace, be still, and the wind ceased, and there was a great calm.” Mark 4:39. Compare Psalm 107:29.

The noise of their waves - The loud roar of the waters, so that they are still.

And the tumult of the people - The raging; the fury; the excitement of assembled multitudes, resembling the raging waves of the ocean. This comparison is very common. See Isaiah 17:12-13. Compare the notes at Revelation 19:6. This is perhaps a more striking and wonderful exhibition of the power of God than that of calming down the waves of the ocean. In the one case, it is the exertion of mere power on nature, acting through its established laws, and where there is no resistance of will; in the other, it is power exerted over the will; power over agents conscious that they are free, and where the worst passions meet and mingle and rage.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-65.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 65:7

Which stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

God’s providence displayed in the suppression of popular tumults

I. The body of the people, like the body of waters, is never absolutely at rest; and when it is most so, it is always disposed to become otherwise.

1. Dissatisfactions with measures of government are most easily conceived; and, when they begin to operate, are extremely productive of those murmurs and rumours amongst the people, which are the forerunners of troubles, and sure signs of approaching tempests in the State.

2. They are further subject to be moved either by affluent, or by desperate, circumstances in their private fortunes. It should seem strange that two so directly opposite causes should concur in producing the same bad effect; but so it does happen, that the very prosperity of those who mistake the use of it, instead of begetting in their minds that content and thankfulness which one should expect as its most natural consequence, is apt to excite in them those turbulent and unruly passions, from whence wars arise.

3. It must be confessed with regret, since it cannot be denied with truth, that the sacred name of religion, which one might have hoped would have contributed to allay these troubles, has but too frequently conspired to foment them.

4. The discontents which arise from these different causes are excellent instruments in the hands of factious and ambitious men, who, under the profession of seeking public interest, are better able to promote, while they conceal, their own.

5. A very superficial view of human nature may serve to convince us, that any one passion adds wings to a man in the progress he makes towards accomplishing his end. It is natural, therefore, to suppose, that when all these different and even contradictory impulses to action, like so many boisterous and contrary winds, have raised the ferment in a people, it must be “like the troubled sea when it cannot rest.”

II. And this might have been, must inevitably have been, our case; if the almighty, who alone can govern “the rage of the sea, and the madness of the people,” had not providentially prescribed the same rule to one, which he has, naturally, prescribed to the other. “Thus far shalt thou go, and no farther; and here shall thy proud waves be stayed.”

1. Let us learn to distinguish, as much as we can, between our own preservation and the destruction of our enemies; and though we cannot ever be sufficiently thankful for one, let us not show an unmanly triumph in rejoicing over the other.

2. Since, by the good providence of God, we are now entirely free from the danger, let us not be weak enough to imagine that we never were in any.

3. As we now commemorate a day which “the Lord hath,” undoubtedly, “made, we ought,” indisputably, “to rejoice and be glad in it”; but let not that gladness be shown in a giddy round of mirth and wantonness, in successive scenes of intemperance and excess and riot; but in a sober and modest complacency, in the consciousness of having had God for our protector; in contemplating His adorable power; in addressing our thanks to Him for His unmerited goodness, and in supplicating the continuance of His protection to us.

4. Let not our gratitude end with the day; let it live as long as we have hearts to conceive, and breath to express it. (T. Ashton, D. D.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 65:7". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-65.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Which stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves,.... By a word speaking; as our Lord did when here on earth, and which was a proof and evidence of his eternal power and Godhead. These figurative expressions are interpreted by the next clause;

and the tumult of the people: of wicked men, who foam and rage against the people of God, and are like a troubled sea that cannot rest; but God can say to these proud waters, which threaten to go over their souls, Peace, be still; he can stop their opposition, quell their insurrections, restrain their wrath, and make them peaceable and quiet; wherefore the saints have no reason to be afraid of them, Psalm 46:2.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-65.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Which stilleth the f noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

(f) He shows that there is no part or creature in the world which is not governed by God's power and providence.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-65.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Which stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

Tumult — No less wild and impetuous.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-65.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 65:7 Which stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

Ver. 7. Which stilleth the noise of the seas] Making a calm at his pleasure; he hath the sea itself, that brutish creature, at his beck and check; so hath he also devils, and masterless men, who seek to subvert civil government, and to lay all level. Hence it followeth,

The noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people] When they are in hurly-burly, and contentions among themselves (Virg. Æneid).

- Saevitque animis ignobile vulgus,

Iamque faces et saxa volant, furor arms ministrat.

Now it is God only that can assuage these tumults; others may stir strife, but God only can stint it, saith Pindarus, Rαδιον πολιν σεισαι και του τυχοντος, αλλ αυθις καθισταναι μονου θεου θερας. It is he alone

Qui terram inertem, qui mare temperat

Ventosum, et urbes regnaque tristia,

Divosque mortalesque turbas

Imperio regit unus aequo.

(Horat. Od. 4, lib. 3.)


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-65.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The noise of their waves, when the sea is tempestuous, and threatens to swallow up ships and men that are in it, or to overflow the earth. And the tumult of the people; and as he stills the natural, so also he quiets the metaphorical seas, tumultuous and unruly people; for multitudes of people are oft called seas in prophetical writings, as Isaiah 17:12,13 Jer 51:42 Revelation 17:15.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-65.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Provoke him. The faithless Jews, or Gentiles; particularly those of Babylon; or those among God's people, who neglected his service, Aggeus iv., and 1 Esdras ix., &c. (Calmet) --- These often gave way to murmuring, and are therefore exhorted not to be proud, lest they should be brought low.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-65.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the people = peoples.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-65.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) Tumult.—Here we see the literal passing into the figurative. From the raging seas the poet’s thought goes to the anarchies arising from the wild passions of men, for which in all literature the ocean has furnished metaphors. (Comp. Isaiah 17:12.) In a well-known passage, the Latin poet Virgil reverses the simile, likening the sudden calm which succeeds the storm that wrecked Æneas to the effect produced by a leader of men in a seditious city. (Virgil, Æn. i. 148.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-65.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Which stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.
Which
89:9; 107:29; Jonah 1:4,15; Matthew 8:26,27
noise
93:3,4; 104:6-9; Job 38:8-11
tumult
2:1-4; 76:10; Isaiah 17:12,13; John 18:6

Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 65:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-65.html.

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