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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:1

 

 

Shout joyfully to God, all the earth;

Adam Clarke Commentary

Make a joyfull noise - Sing aloud to God, all ye lands - all ye people who, from different parts of the Babylonish empire, are now on return to your own land.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Make a joyful noise unto God - literally, “Shout.” It is a call for exultation and praise.

All ye lands - Margin, as in Hebrew, all the earth. The occasion was one that made universal exultation and praise proper. They who had been so deeply affected by the gracious interposition of God, could not but call on all the nations of the earth to unite with them in the expression of joy. The deliverance was so great that they wished all to rejoice with them (compare Luke 15:6, Luke 15:9); and the intervention of God in the case of his people, furnished lessons about his character which gave occasion to all men to rejoice.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-66.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

PSALM 66

LET ALL THE EARTH PRAISE GOD

SUPERSCRIPTION: FOR THE CHIEF MUSICIAN

A SONG; A PSALM.

Addis stated that, "We have two Psalms here: (1) that of the nation (Psalms 66:1-12); and (2) that of an individual (Psalms 66:13-20."[1] Despite opinions of this kind offered by a number of scholars, we find no necessity whatever for the acceptance of such notions.

Yes, indeed, it is true that there is a sharp change in the movement from Psalms 66:12 to Psalms 66:13; but this evident duality is easily explained.

If the psalm was written shortly after the deliverance of Israel from the army of Sennacherib (2 Kings 19), during the reign of Hezekiah, who himself had received a most remarkable deliverance from what was apparently his death-bed, by the miraculous help of God, then either Hezekiah, or someone writing upon his behalf might easily have composed this psalm, first extolling the deliverance of the nation, and then the personal deliverance of their king. Of all the conjectures offered regarding the occasion of this psalm, this explanation appeals to us as reasonable far more than any other.

Ash rejected the notion of this being two psalms joined together, stating that, "The author was a king or a national leader, whose personal experience in trial was a typical part of the larger national problem."[2] Of course such facts indeed fit the case of Hezekiah, first delivered from a fatal illness, and then delivered from the Assyrian army.

Yates also rejected the proposition that we have two psalms here, stating that, "The corporate experience of the nation forms an excellent background for the individual experience of the author."[3]

Matthew Henry wrote that, "This psalm is of such a general use and application that we need not suppose it was penned upon any particular occasion."[4] This opinion, however, ignores the very obvious truth that this psalm celebrates a most remarkable and unusual deliverance of Israel from some overwhelming danger.

As Dummelow expressed it: "This Psalm triumphantly celebrates a great national deliverance. So great that the whole earth is summonsed to join in the praise."[5] Two such "great" deliverances have been proposed, that of the destruction of Sennacherib's Assyrian army, and the return from Babylonian captivity. In our judgment, the deliverance from the Assyrians fits the psalm best.

Delitzsch pointed out that Psalms 65-68 are designated both as "a song," and as "a psalm." He further noted that, "The frequent use of `Selah' was connected with instructions for the musicians, and these annotations referring to the temple music favor the pre-exilic rather than the post exilic origin (or date) of Psalms 66 and Psalms 67."[6]

THE WHOLE WORLD SUMMONSED TO CELEBRATE THE GRAND DELIVERANCE OF ISRAEL

Psalms 66:1-4

"Make a joyful noise unto God, all the earth:

Sing forth the glory of his name:

Make his praise glorious.

Say unto God, How terrible are thy works!

Through the greatness of thy power shall thine enemies submit themselves unto thee.

All the earth shall worship thee,

And shall sing unto thee;

They shall sing to thy name. (Selah)"

"Make a joyful noise" (Psalms 66:1). The word "noise" here is not really appropriate for the singing that is enjoined, but it is used for the purpose of saying ordinary singing is not loud enough adequately to praise God for such a tremendous deliverance as that which Israel has just experienced.

"All the earth" (Psalms 66:1). Furthermore, Israel feels that her praise of God could not possibly be sufficient to extol such a great deliverance, therefore the whole world is invited to join in the praise.

"The point here is that the deliverance which God's people have experienced is so great that they are unable to offer praise in such a volume as the occasion required. Therefore let all the earth do her part."[7]

"This call for `all the earth' to join in implies that the nation's deliverance is of worldwide significance. That significance does not derive so much from the preservation of God's people as from the disclosure of God's glorious being."[8]

In this disclosure of God's glorious power, the destruction of Sennacherib's army was an event fully as remarkable and wonderful as the overwhelming of the host of Pharaoh in the Red Sea, an event significantly mentioned in this connection a few lines later.

"All the earth shall worship thee" (Psalms 66:4). In this psalm, these words simply mean that all the earth `should' worship God; but as they stand the words are also a prophecy of what indeed is going on now `all over the earth.' All of the ancient pagan deities have been vanquished by the True God; and although the human worship of God is by no means unanimous, it is yet true that God is worshipped in every part of the earth.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-66.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Make a joyful noise unto God,.... The Creator of the ends of the earth; the Provider for all his creatures; and the Dispenser of the blessings of grace, under the Gospel dispensation, to men in all countries. The Messiah may well be thought to be intended, since the psalm refers to Gospel times; who is God over all, blessed for ever; to whom a joyful noise, shouts, and acclamations, are to be made by all his subjects, true believers in him, in all lands, as to their King; see Numbers 23:21; who is ascended on high, has led captivity captive; received gifts for then, and gives them to them; is enthroned on his Father's right hand, is crowned with glory and honour, where he reigns, and must reign, till all enemies are put under his feet; when his kingdom will be from sea to sea, and from the river to the ends of the earth: and upon the destruction of his enemies, and the enlargement of his kingdom in the latter day, voices will be heard in heaven, the church; and such joyful noises as are here exhorted and directed to, Revelation 19:1. Moreover, such acclamations are suitable to him, as a victorious conqueror; who, at his death, overcame sin, Satan, the world, and death itself; and, by the ministry of the Gospel, went forth conquering, and to conquer; and has subdued many people in all nations, and caused his ministers to triumph in him in every place; and who, by his Spirit and grace, still continues to bring souls to a subjection to him, to dispossess Satan from them, to set up his throne in their hearts, and reign there, and to make them more than conquerors through himself that has loved them: of which there will be more numerous instances in the latter day; and all such are under great obligations to make a joyful noise unto him, or to express their joy and thankfulness in loud singing of his praises;

all ye lands; that is, all the inhabitants of the earth, as the Targum; not Judea, to which some restrain it, but the whole earth: for Christ is the Saviour of some, in all countries, of the children of God, that are scattered abroad throughout the whole world, for whom he is a propitiation. The Gospel has been sent to all nations, and preached to every creature; some in all lands have been converted, and made partakers of the blessings and privileges of the Gospel, and therefore have reason to be glad and make a joyful noise; and the more so, inasmuch as they were in a state of great darkness and ignorance before, without Christ, without hope, and without God in the world.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-66.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

"To the chief Musician, A Song [or] Psalm." Make a joyful noise unto God, a all ye lands:

(a) He prophecies that all nations will come to the knowledge of God, who then was only known in Judea.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-66.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Psalm 66:1-20. The writer invites all men to unite in praise, cites some striking occasions for it, promises special acts of thanksgiving, and celebrates God‘s great mercy.

Make … noise — or, “Shout.”


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands:

All lands — Ye people of all nations. He invites the Gentile world, to the contemplation and celebration of God's works.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-66.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.Shout unto God, all the earth The psalm begins with this general declaration, which is afterwards reduced to particulars. (467) He addresses himself to the whole world, and from this it would seem evident, that he predicts the extent to which the kingdom of God should reach at the coming of Christ. In the second verse the call is repeated with increasing vehemency, to stir up to the praises of God, such as might otherwise be remiss in the service. To sing the honor of his name, is an expression sufficiently obvious; meaning, that we should extol his sacred name in a manner suitable to its dignity, so that it may obtain its due and deserved adoration. But the clause which follows is rather ambiguous. Some think that it conveys a repetition of the same idea contained in other words, and read, set forth the glory of his praise. (468) I prefer taking the Hebrew word signifyingpraise to be in the accusative case; rendering the words literally, make a glory his praise. And by this I understand him to mean, not as some do, that we should glory exclusively in his praises, (469) but simply, that we highly exalt his praises, that they may be glorious. The Psalmist is not satisfied with our declaring them moderately, and insists that we should celebrate his goodness in some measure proportionably to its excellence.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-66.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 66:1 « To the chief Musician, A Song [or] Psalm. » Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands:

Ver. 1. Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands] Heb. All the earth; shout aloud for joy, as the people did at the return of the ark, so that the earth rang again. God shall one day show himself to be the God, not of Jews only, but of Gentiles also; these shall as well cry Christ as those Jews; these say Father, as those Abba. And as there was great joy in Samaria when the gospel was there first received, Acts 8:8, so shall there be the like in all other parts of the earth.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-66.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 66.

David exhorteth to praise God, to observe his great works, to bless him for his gracious benefits: he voweth for himself religious service to God: he declareth God's special goodness to himself.

To the chief musician, A Song or Psalm.

Title. מזמור שׁיר למנצח lamnatseach shiir mizmor. This psalm has not David's name to it; nor is it known upon what occasion it was composed. Bishop Patrick's conjecture seems as probable as any other; namely, that it was written by David after God had advanced him to the throne, and peaceably settled him in his kingdom. But thus much only is certain, that it was composed upon some extraordinary national deliverance. See Psalms 66:13. The Psalmist introduces it with the general Providence which God had exercised over his people; especially at their coming out of Egypt; for which he calls upon all the earth to celebrate his glory. The title of the LXX is, "A Psalm of the Resurrection."


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-66.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Here we have a song of praise, both for the public mercies of God to his church, and the private manifestations of the same to every individual of it.

To the chief musician, A

Song 1-8

In every point of view the employment here enjoined is of universal concern. All lands, all nations, all kingdoms, the whole earth, every individual, can, and ought to find subject of praise. But when a nation, or people, or an individual; can sing the song of redemption, Jesus loved me, Jesus saved me, Jesus gave himself for me; what high notes of praise are then swelling the song. Reader, can you join in this chorus? Can you sing the song of Moses and the Lamb now? Do you hope ere long to sing that song among the glorified above, which no man could learn but the hundred and forty and four thousand redeemed from the earth? Revelation 14:3.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-66.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PSALM 66

THE ARGUMENT

The author and time of the composing of this Psalm are uncertain. This is manifest, and sufficient for our understanding of it. That it was made upon the occasion of some great and glorious deliverance afforded to the Israelites, after and out of some grievous and general calamity, and, as some not improbably conceive, that out of Babylon.

The prophet exhorteth all to praise God for his wonderful works, Psalms 66:1-8, especially for delivering his church out of all trouble, Psalms 66:9-12. He promiseth unto God thanksgiving, and to pay the vows he made in trouble, Psalms 66:13-15; calling to others to see God’s goodness to his soul, blesseth him for it, Psalms 66:16-20.

Ye people of all nations, who have seen the wonderful power, and wisdom, and fidelity, and goodness of God in our deliverance, it becomes you to acknowledge it with admiration and rejoicing. Or,

all the land, or this land. But the former sense is more probable from Psalms 66:4, where this word is so used. And it is very proper in this place, and usual in other places of Scriptures, to invite the Gentile world to the contemplation and celebration of God’s works to and for his people. See Deuteronomy 32:43 1 Chronicles 16:23,24.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-66.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1. All ye lands—Literally, all the earth, as in Psalms 66:4. The call is universal.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-66.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

For David, is not in Hebrew, nor in some copies of the Septuagint. (Calmet) --- Yet the psalm expresses the sentiments of the royal prophet, (Berthier) or it is a sequel to the two former [psalms], thanking God for liberty, and for rain. The Fathers explain it of the coming of Jesus Christ, and the calling of the Gentiles, ver. 5. It many have been sung when the first-fruits were brought to the temple. See Psalm lxxxiv. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-66.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Title. Song. Hebrew. shir. See App-65.

Psalm. Hebrew. mizmor. See App-65.

ye lands = the earth; earth being put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Subject), for its inhabitants.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-66.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands:

Psalms 66:1-20.-Thanksgiving for deliverance. All the earth is invited to praise God for the marvels performed for His people (Psalms 66:1-4); the marvels, especially His turning the sea into dry land (Psalms 66:5-7); ground of praise, in that He brought His people into a wealthy place (Psalms 66:8-12); payment of the Psalmist's vows made in trouble (Psalms 66:13-14); invitation to all to hear what God has done for his soul, since he prayed in sincerity and purity (Psalms 66:16-20). There is a general reference to the deliverance from Sennacherib. Psalms 46:1-11 specially commemorates it (cf. Psalms 66:8 there with Psalms 66:5 here).

All ye lands - Hebrew, 'all the earth.'


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Make a joyful noise.—Better, sing aloud, or shout.

All ye lands.—The margin is better.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-66.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands:
A. M. 3469. B.C. 535. Make
81:1; 95:1,2; 98:4; 100:1; 1 Chronicles 15:28
all ye lands
Heb. all the earth.
96:1; 117:1,2; 150:6; 1 Chronicles 16:23,24; Isaiah 24:16

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 66:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-66.html.

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