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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:11

 

 

You brought us into the net; You laid an oppressive burden upon our loins.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thou broughtest us into the net - This refers well to the case of the Israelites, when, in their departure from Egypt, pursued by the Egyptians, having the Red Sea before them, and no method of escape, Pharaoh said, "The wilderness hath shut them in, - they are entangled;" comparing their state to that of a wild beast in a net.

Affliction upon our loins - Perhaps this alludes to that sharp pain in the back and loins which is generally felt on the apprehension of sudden and destructive danger.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Thou broughtest us into the net - That is, Thou hast suffered or permitted us to be brought into the net; thou hast suffered us to be taken captive, as beasts are caught in a snare. See the notes at Psalm 9:15. The allusion here is to the efforts made by their enemies to take them, as hunters lay gins, or spread nets, to capture wild beasts. The idea here is, that those enemies had been successful; God had suffered them to fall into their hands. If we suppose this psalm to have been composed on the return from the Babylonian captivity, the propriety of this language will be apparent, for it well describes the fact that the nation had been subdued by the Babylonians, and had been led captive into a distant land. Compare Lamentations 1:13.

Thou laidst affliction upon our loins - The loins are mentioned as the seat of strength (compare Deuteronomy 33:11; 1 Kings 12:10; Job 40:16).; and the idea here is, that he had put their strength to the test; he had tried them to see how much they could bear; he had made the test effectual by applying it to the part which was able to bear most. The idea is, that he had called them to endure as much as they were able to endure. He had tried them to the utmost.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-66.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Thou broughtest us into the net,.... That is, suffered them to be taken in the net of wicked men, which they laid and spread for them; whereby they were drawn either into bad principles or bad practices, or into ruinous circumstances; though the Lord does not leave his own people there, but breaks the net or snare, sooner or later, and they escape; see Psalm 9:15. Jarchi interprets it of a strait place, as in a prison; and which has often been literally true of the people of God, into which, though they have been cast by Satan, or by men instigated by him, yet, because permitted by the Lord, it is ascribed to him, Revelation 2:10;

thou laidst affliction upon our loins: the Targum renders it "a chain": the word signifies anything that is binding and pressing; it seems to be a metaphor taken from the binding of burdens upon the backs of any creatures. Afflictions often lie heavy upon the saints, are very close upon them, and press them sore, even, as they sometimes think, beyond measure; though the Lord supports them, and will not suffer them to sink under them.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-66.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Thou broughtest us into the g net; thou laidst affliction upon our loins.

(g) The condition of the Church is here described, which is to be led by God's providence into troubles, to be subject under tyrants, and to enter into many dangers.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-66.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

affliction — literally, “pressure,” or, as in Psalm 55:3, “oppression,” which, laid on the

loins — the seat of strength (Deuteronomy 33:11), enfeebles the frame.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Thou broughtest us into the net; thou laidst affliction upon our loins.

Net — Which our enemies laid for us.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-66.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 66:11 Thou broughtest us into the net; thou laidst affliction upon our loins.

Ver. 11. Thou broughtest us into the net] A metaphor from hunters or fowlers, Utitur figuris tanquam in poemate.

Thou layedst affliction upon our loins] Coarctationem in lumbis; we are not only hampered, as in a net, but fettered, as with chains; as if we had been in the jailor’s or hangman’s hands.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-66.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou broughtest us into the net which our enemies laid for us, and which could never have taken or held us but by the permission and disposal of thy providence, which gave us into their hands.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-66.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

11. Net—More properly a fastness, a stronghold, as the word almost always means; here referring to the prison of their captivity, like the labyrinths of a mountain cavern. Psalms 66:11-12 describe their sufferings and degradation.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-66.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

affliction = a heavy burden: i.e. in Egypt. Hebrew. mu"akah. Occurs only here.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-66.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) Net.—The Hebrew in Ezekiel 12:13 certainly means “net,” as LXX. and Vulg. here. But Aquila, Symmachus, and Jerome prefer the usual meaning, “stronghold” (2 Samuel 5:7, &c), which is more in keeping with the other images of violence and oppression. The fortress, the hard labour, the subjection as by foes riding over the vanquished, the passage through fire and water, all raise a picture of the direst tyranny.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-66.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Thou broughtest us into the net; thou laidst affliction upon our loins.
broughtest
Job 19:6; Lamentations 1:13; 3:2-66; Hosea 7:12; Matthew 6:13
upon
Deuteronomy 33:11

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 66:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-66.html.

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