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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:16

 

 

Come and hear, all who fear God, And I will tell of what He has done for my soul.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Come and hear, all ye that fear God - While in captivity, the psalmist had sought the Lord with frequent prayer for his own personal salvation, and for the deliverance of the people; and God blessed him, heard his prayer, and turned the captivity. Now that he is returned in safety, he is determined to perform his vows to the Lord; and calls on all them that fear their Maker, who have any religious reverence for him, to attend to his account of the Lord's gracious dealings with him. He proposes to tell them his spiritual experience, what he needed, what he earnestly prayed for, and what God has done for him. Thus he intended to teach them by example, more powerful always than precept, however weighty in itself, and impressively delivered.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Come and hear, all ye that fear God - All who are true worshippers of God - the idea of fear or reverence being put for worship in general. The call is on all who truly loved God to hear what he had done, in order that he might be suitably honored, and that due praise might be given him.

And I will declare what he hath done for my soul - This is probably the personification of an individual to represent the people, considered as delivered from oppression and bondage. The words “for my soul” are equivalent to “for me.” Literally, “for my life.” The phrase would embrace all that God had done by his gracious intervention in delivering the people from bondage. The language here is such as may be used by any one who is converted to God, in reference

(a) to all that God has done to redeem the soul;

(b) to all that he has done to pardon its guilt;

(c) to all that he has done to give it peace and joy;

(d) to all that he has done to enable it to overcome sin;

(e) to all that he has done to give it comfort in the prospect of death;

(f) to all that he has done to impart thee hope of heaven.

The principle here is one which it is right to apply to all such cases. It is right and proper for a converted sinner to call on others to hear what God has done for him;

(a) because it is due to God thus to honor him;

(b) because the converted heart naturally gives utterance to expressions of gratitude and praise, or wishes to make known the joy derived from pardoned sin;

(c) because there is in such a soul a strong desire that others may partake of the same blessedness, and find the same satisfaction and peace in the service of God.

It is the duty of those who are pardoned and converted thus to call on others to hear what God has done for them;

(a) because others have the same need of religion which they have;

(b) because the same salvation is provided for them which has been provided for those who have found peace;

(c) because all are under obligation to make known as far as possible the fact that God has provided salvation for sinners, and that all may be saved.

He who has no such sense of the mercy of God, manifested toward himself, as to desire that others may be saved - who sees no such value in the religion which he professes as to have an earnest wish that others may partake of it also - can have no real evidence that his own heart has ever been converted to God. Compare the notes at Romans 9:1-3; notes at Romans 10:1.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-66.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Come and hear, all ye that fear God,.... Who have a reverential affection for him, and by whom he is worshipped and served with reverence and godly fear; these have good things done for themselves, and will glorify God for what he does for others: these know the nature, worth, and value of the good things the Lord does for the souls of men, and hear them with pleasure and profit; when to tell them to others is casting pearl before swine, and giving that which is holy to dogs; and therefore only such as fear the Lord are called upon to come and hear what follows. Jarchi interprets this character of proselytes; see Acts 13:26;

and I will declare what he hath done for my soul: not what he had done for God, or offered unto him, or suffered for his sake; nor what God had done for his body in the make and preservation of it; but what he had done for his soul, and the salvation of that: what God the Father had done in setting him apart for himself; in making a sure, well ordered, and everlasting covenant with him in Christ; in blessing him with all spiritual blessings in him; in providing for the redemption of his soul by him; in pardoning his sins, justifying his person, adopting him into his family, and regenerating, quickening, and sanctifying him: also what God the Son had done for him; in engaging to assume a true body and a reasonable soul on his account; and to make that soul an offering for his sin, and thereby obtain for him eternal redemption, even the salvation of his immortal soul: likewise what God the Spirit had done for him; in quickening and enlightening his soul; in implanting principles of grace and holiness in it; in showing Christ unto him, and bringing near his righteousness, and leading him to him for salvation and eternal life; in applying exceeding great and precious promises to him, and remembering to him such on which he had caused him to hope; in delivering him out of temptation and troubles, and in carrying on the work of his grace in him hitherto: these are things that are not to be concealed in a man's breast, but to be told to the church and people of God, to their joy and comfort, and to the glory of divine grace; see Mark 5:19.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-66.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

i Come [and] hear, all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.

(i) It is not enough to have received God's benefits and to be mindful of it, but also we are bound to make others profit by it and praise God.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-66.html. 1599-1645.

Scofield's Reference Notes

fear

(See Scofield "Psalms 19:9").


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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Psalms 66:16". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/psalms-66.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 66:16 Come [and] hear, all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.

Ver. 16. Come and hear] He had said before, "Come and see," Psalms 66:5. He held it a greater honour prodesse quam praeesse.

All ye that fear God] For such only will hear to good purpose; others either cannot or care not.

And I will declare, &c.] Communicate unto you my soul-secrets and experiments. There is no small good to be gotten by such declarations. Bilney, perceiving Latimer to be zealous without knowledge, came to him in his study, and desired him for God’s sake to hear his confession. I did so, saith Latimer, and, to say the truth, by his confession I learned more than before in many years. So from that time forward I began to smell the word of God, and forsake the school doctors and such fooleries (Acts & Mon.).


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-66.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:16

Gratitude towards God and generosity towards man—these are two of the marked features in the character of David. In the text he gathers, as it were, a little select congregation around him of those who, like himself, had had experience of God's goodness. He asks them to join with him in praising and blessing God; and he instructs them, and strengthens them, and encourages them by recounting to them what God had done for himself.

I. We declare with thankfulness what God hath done for our souls in the act of redeeming us. God sent His Son to bless us in turning every one of us from his iniquities. Salvation is a free gift. It is the gift of free and full pardon for all the bad life that is past, and the pledge and the power of a better life to come.

II. The gift of the Holy Scriptures is the second thing that God hath done for our souls. The best way of showing our gratitude for so great a blessing is to use it well.

III. It is not merely as separate persons, one by one, that God has furnished us with blessings made ready to our souls. We are members of a great society. The Holy Catholic Church is a part of the system of our religion. We have sacraments, and common prayer, and public instruction, and mutual help.

IV. We have the supreme blessing of the grace of the Holy Spirit and the blessing of providential care.

V. We advance one step further, and enter the inner circle of all. At this point especially the words of the Psalm are addressed to those who fear God, and it is only they who can thoroughly enter into their meaning. "O come hither and hearken, all ye that fear God, and I will tell you what He hath done for my soul." This desire to help others is a certain mark of true conversion. Gratitude to God will find its natural development in generosity to man.

J. S. Howson, Penny Pulpit, No. 345.

References: Psalms 66:16.—C. J. Vaughan, Harrow Sermons, 1st series, p. 388; C. C. Bartholomew, Sermons chiefly Practical, p; 303; W. R. Nicoll, Calls to Christ, p. 9; Congregationalist, vol. vi., p. 539; G. S. Barrett, Old Testament Outlines, p. 119. Psalms 66:16-20.—Homiletic Quarterly, vol. i., p. 119. Psalms 66:20.—Spurgeon, Morning by Morning, p. 145. Psalms 67:1, Psalms 67:2.—J. Edmunds, Sermons in a Village Church, p. 144; H. Phillips, Christian World Pulpit, vol. i., p. 237.




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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/psalms-66.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 66:16. Come and hear, all ye, &c.— Here we must suppose the Psalmist in the temple; speaking, as is frequently the case in other places of the psalms, to the assembled people, and declaring, to the honour of God, that he had heard and answered his prayer. He mentions no particular; probably it was a deliverance somewhat analogous to that of the Israelites which makes the subject of this psalm, and from some heathen nation who had oppressed them: he had, very likely, been a prisoner and made his escape; which makes him say, "If I had regarded vanity," i.e. "If I had ever, while I was a captive among the heathen, been corrupted into any idolatrous practices, God would not have heard me;" &c. That this was a proper subject for thanksgiving we may see in Psalms 107:2-9. Mudge.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, We have here,

1. The persons called upon to unite in the praises of God: All lands, not merely the people of Israel, but all the ends of the earth. Note; Though God is merciful to all, we have peculiar reason to bless him for that full and glorious Gospel which he has sent to us.

2. The manner of their praises. They must make a joyful noise, sing aloud their Creator's and Redeemer's praises, proclaim his glory; and in their lives, as well as lips, shew forth his honour.

3. The reasons why they should thus praise him. [1.] Because of his terrible works and the greatness of his power, manifested in the abasement of his enemies. Note; Every antichristian foe will be made shortly to bow at the feet of the faithful, and to know that God hath loved them. [2.] For the mercies manifested to his church of old; the remembrance of which should be ever new; such as was the deliverance of the Israelites from Egypt, when the sea opened a way for them to pass over; there did we rejoice in him. Note; Our Father's mercies are our own, and should awaken our praises. [3.] Because the same protection shall be for ever vouchsafed to all the faithful. As God ever rules, and ever sees the devices of their enemies, he will disappoint them, to the confusion of his people's proud and rebellious foes. Note; Since all power is given to Christ in heaven and on earth, his faithful people may be assured that no powers of darkness shall be able to hurt them, but they shall with joy see them shortly put under his feet and theirs for ever.

2nd, They who have an interest in God, as their covenant God, ought to make their voices of grateful praise to be heard. Particularly,

1. For their lives; not only the preservation of bodily life, but more especially for the spiritual life which Christ has bestowed and maintains; and suffereth not our feet to be moved; though sore thrust at by temptation, yet by the power of grace our souls are preserved.

2. For the blessed issue of their trials. Many an enemy had harassed the land, they had been taken prisoners in the net of their oppressors, had suffered a variety of afflictions, been trampled upon and insulted by the Philistines and neighbouring nations; but it was to prove, not destroy them; and therefore they were delivered, and public tranquillity and plenty restored to them. Thus the church of Christ has been also in the furnace of affliction, under the man of sin, in Rome pagan and papal, has passed through variety of tortures by fire and water, terrible as those devouring elements, and been often reduced to the greatest distress, in order to prove the patience of the saints; but God will bring them into a wealthy or large place; as at the Reformation, when true religion reared its head; and as will be more eminently the case, when at last Christ shall come and reign over his saints gloriously. This also is the state of every faithful believer, who passes through temptation, painful as the action of fire, and deep as the floods; but the issue shall be peace; his graces, thus exercised, shall shine the brighter, and into his wealthy place, even a mansion in eternal glory, will he be brought: when he has suffered a little while for Christ, he shall reign with him for ever.

3rdly, The Psalmist here, in the person of the faithful, declares the effects that God's grace and protection would have upon them.

1. He and they would offer the noblest sacrifices appointed under the law; the fattest beasts shall burn on God's altar, according to the vows they had made in trouble. Note; Since Christ's one oblation was offered, all other sacrifices of blood are abolished; but sacrifices of praise will never cease ascending from every faithful heart, and will go up with acceptance in the smoke which arises from the Saviour's sacrifice, making all our offerings a sweet-smelling savour to God.

2. He calls on all who fear God to come and hear what God had done; what wonders of grace in pardoning, sanctifying, comforting, and saving his sinful soul; and this in answer to his constant and fervent prayer, which God, who knew the simplicity of his heart, had heard and granted; and for which he desires ever to bless and praise him, as for all his mercies. Note; (1.) We are bound, for God's glory, and the encouragement of his people, to communicate our experience of his goodness; not as vain of our mercies, as if the favourites of heaven, but as thankfully terrifying our gratitude to him from whom we have received all. (2.) There can be no comfort obtained from prayer, nor any well-grounded confidence entertained of God's acceptance of us, whilst allowed and indulged iniquity remains in the heart. (3.) They who lift up holy hands, without wrath and doubting, may rise from their knees continually blessing and praising God.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-66.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 606

ANSWERS TO FRAYER ACKNOWLEDGED

Psalms 66:16. Come and hear, all ye that fear God! and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.

ANY person of benevolence who should have discovered an antidote, or remedy, to a very fatal disorder, would feel happy in communicating information respecting it, wherever such knowledge was required [Note: This has been done in reference to vaccination by the benevolent Dr. Jenner.]. If indeed great gain would accrue to him by concealment, we must concede to him the right of procuring to himself the advantages to which his superior knowledge has entitled him: but where the very act of communicating information will enrich, rather than impoverish, the instructor, and he himself will be made a gainer by imparting, he would be highly criminal if he withheld from the world the blessings he was enabled to coirfer. This is invariably the case in things pertaining to the soul: and hence we may expect to find all who have been taught of God, ready and willing to impart to others the benefits they have received. The early Apostles, Andrew and Philip, no sooner found the Messiah, than they sought to bring their brethren, Peter and Nathanael, to an acquaintance with him [Note: John 1:40; John 1:45.]. And the Samaritan woman was no sooner convinced herself of the Messiahship of Jesus, than she went to invite all the men of her city to come and see the person, whom she believed to be the Christ [Note: John 4:28-29.]. Thus it was with David: he communed much with God: he learned much from God: he was favoured with the richest communications which God himself could bestow. But he would not keep these things to himself: he hoped, by a free communication with pious characters, to bring them to a participation of all that he himself enjoyed: and therefore, filled with divine philanthropy, he sent out, as it were, this general invitation, “Come and hear, all ye that fear God; and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.”

In discoursing on these words, we will shew,

I. What God had done for his soul—

David, as we are told in the foregoing context, had been involved in many troubles, from which nothing but a Divine interposition could have delivered him [Note: ver. 10–12.]. But we must not confine the subject to temporal deliverances: he speaks of something which God had done for “his soul;” and more particularly specifies, that God “had not turned away his mercy from him [Note: ver. 20.];” and makes that the peculiar ground of his praise and thanksgiving. We observe then that God had vouchsafed to him,

1. The pardon of his sins—

[This would have been an exceedingly rich mercy, even if David had never fallen from his former integrity. But, if we view the great enormities committed by him in the matter of Uriah, we see good reason why he should magnify God’s mercy beyond any other of the sons of men. Whether this psalm was written prior, or subsequent to his fall, we know not; and therefore we forbear to notice that as an aggravation of his guilt, or as enhancing the mercy vouchsafed to him. As a man, he was a sinner from his mother’s womb: and the most perfect of men could no more stand than the vilest, if God should enter into judgment with him, and mark in him all that had been done amiss. David was sensible of this, and acknowledged it in these expressive terms: “I will praise thee, O Lord my God, with all my heart; and I will glorify thy name for evermore: for great is thy mercy towards me: and thou hast delivered my soul from the lowest hell [Note: Psalms 86:12-13.].” Let us be sensible, how much we also stand in need of mercy; and let us seek it as that without which our souls must for ever perish: or, if we have received mercy, let us devoutly glorify our God for it as a benefit which no words can ever adequately express.]

2. A manifestation of that pardon to his soul—

[David had prayed earnestly to God, and had obtained an answer to his prayer. How this answer was conveyed to his mind, we are not informed: but he had no doubt in his own soul respecting it: he could say, “Verily God hath heard me; he hath attended to the voice of my prayer [Note: ver. 19.].” O! who can estimate aright this mercy? See how the prophet Jeremiah speaks of it: “I called upon thy name, O Lord, out of the low dungeon. Thou hast heard my voice: hide not thine ear at my breathing, at my cry. Thou drewest near in the day that I called upon thee; thou saidst, Fear not [Note: Lamentations 3:55-57.].” How tender! how pathetic! how encouraging this acknowledgment! Such was David’s also, on another occasion: “I sought the Lord, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears. This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles [Note: Psalms 34:4; Psalms 34:6.].” Truly this is a great and blessed work which “the Lord does for the souls” of men: and it was with good reason that David said, “Come and hear, all ye that fear God; and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.”]

But it will be proper to state more particularly,

II. Why he was so ready to speak of it—

It was not from ostentation or vanity that he thus called the attention of others to his own concerns, but,

1. From a sense of gratitude to God—

[Such mercies call for the liveliest gratitude, and demand a tribute of praise from the whole world. Hence the soul that feels its obligations for them, would be glad to interest the whole creation in the blessed work of praise and thanksgiving. This David attempts in many of his psalms: “I will bless the Lord at all times: his praise shall continually be in my mouth. My soul shall make her boast in the Lord: the humble shall hear thereof, and be glad. O magnify the Lord with me; and let us exalt his name together [Note: Psalms 34:1-3; Psalms 96:1-4.]!” — — — Had any reflection been cast on him for these devout acknowledgments, he would have replied, as on another occasion, “Is there not a cause [Note: 1 Samuel 17:29.]?” or rather, would have welcomed the disgrace, and said, “I will yet be more vile than thus [Note: 1 Samuel 6:21.].”]

2. From a sense of love to his fellow-creatures—

[Nothing is more gratifying to the saints than to see or hear what God has done for others. To them therefore David addresses himself. He speaks not to the ungodly; for that would be to “cast pearls before swine:” but to the godly he knew that the recital of his experience would be a rich source of comfort and encouragement. In another place he explicitly avows this very intention; and, for the promotion of that end, he gives a summary of the Lord’s dealings with him during his long impenitence, and on the very first symptoms of penitence and contrition [Note: Psalms 32:3-6.]. It is with a similar view that Paul also records his own wickedness in persecuting the Church of Christ; and displays the enormous unparalleled exercise of God’s mercy towards him “the chief of sinners:” he declares, that this whole dispensation towards him was designed by God himself as a pattern for the encouragement of all penitents to the end of time [Note: 1 Timothy 1:13-16.]. We then, if we “fear God,” are the persons invited to come and listen to the voice of David. In all that he has spoken on this subject, he has sought our good: for it was not to him as a prophet that this mercy was vouchsafed, but as a saint, who feared God and wrought righteousness: and every one who in this respect resembles him, may hope to participate with him in his exalted privileges [Note: Compare Psalms 65:2 and Isaiah 65:24 and John 14:13-14. with 1 John 5:13-15.].]

As saints indeed we profess to have already enjoyed them in some measure: and therefore we are concerned to inquire,

III. How we may know whether our souls be partakers of the same benefit—

It is the privilege of all to have access to God, and to have their prayers answered by him: yea, and to know also that they have been answered. Of this we are assured on the authority of God himself — — — But here the question arises, How shall these answers be clearly known to have come from God? Formerly God was pleased to make known to his people their interest in his favour by means which we are no longer to expect. He may indeed, if he see fit, still reveal his will to men by dreams and visions, by voices and signs; but we have no reason to think he either does, or will do so; and therefore we can place no confidence in any manifestations which are professedly derived from such sources. We may also say, that nothing certain can be known from any direct impressions of the Spirit of God upon the mind. We are far from affirming that no such impressions are ever made: for there can be no doubt but that God “sheds abroad his love in the hearts of his people,” and gives them “a spirit of adoption, whereby they cry, Abba, Father,” and “by his Spirit witnesses with their spirits that they are the children of God,” and even “seals them by the Holy Spirit of promise unto the day of redemption.” But still, great and glorious as these operations of the Spirit are, they are not sufficient of themselves to prove that God has shewn mercy to our souls: they must have the concurring evidence of good works resulting from them: the feelings themselves may be so closely imitated by Satan, that it shall be impossible for man certainly to distinguish between them: a person of a warm imagination and a confident mind may easily be wrought upon by that subtle spirit, so that he shall appear both to himself and others to be eminently distinguished by manifestations from God, whilst yet he is only under the influence of a Satanic delusion. The evidences whereby alone the work of God upon the soul can be satisfactorily ascertained are,

1. The exercise of gracious affections—

[Love, joy, peace, with all the train of Christian virtues, are the fruits of God’s Spirit alone. They cannot for any length of time be counterfeited: not even Satan himself can produce them. Hence we are told, by our blessed Lord, to look to them as the only certain marks and evidences whereby his people can be distinguished: “By their fruits ye shall know them.” Would you then know for certain whether God has had mercy on your souls, and whether the supposed manifestations of God’s love to your souls are genuine, see how the dispensation operates on your hearts and lives. If it lead you to a sense of lively gratitude to God, if it fill you with a determination to serve and glorify him with all your powers, if it encourage you to commit your every concern to his all-wise disposal, and if it stimulate you to seek by all possible means the welfare of your fellow-creatures, you may confidently say, “He that hath wrought us to the selfsame thing is God.”]

2. The mortification of all sin—

[David says, “If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me [Note: ver. 18.].” To fancy therefore that we have received answers to prayer, whilst there is any sinful temper or disposition harboured in the heart, is a fatal delusion. Even the ungodly Jews, who set themselves in opposition to Christ, were fully convinced of this truth: for, imagining him to he a sinner, and taking occasion from thence to deny the miracle he had wrought, they said, “Now we know that God heareth not sinners; but if any man be a worshipper of God and do his will, him he heareth [Note: John 9:31.].” This then must be a point of diligent inquiry; ‘Is sin in general dispossessed of its power over me? is my besetting sin in particular subdued and mortified? is my hatred to sin inveterate, uniform, unreserved?’ Unless this be our state, it is in vain that we pretend to communion with the Deity, and boast of our assured acceptance with him: if we are under the habitual influence of any one reigning lust, of whatever kind it be, we may make a great profession of religion, but we are hypocrites; we may make a noise about it, but “we are as sounding brass, and as tinkling cymbals.”]

In reference to this subject, we beg leave to offer some advice—

1. Be careful to notice the dealings of God with your souls—

[Many set themselves against all kinds of Christian experience, and make even the very word, experience, a subject of continual ridicule and invective. That injudicious persons have given but too just ground of offence by their statements of their own feelings, must be confessed! but we must not therefore suppose that religion has nothing to do with the feelings, and that it is a matter purely intellectual. Why should that alone have no influence on the heart, when it is calculated more than any thing else to call into activity all the powers of our souls? or why should that be enthusiasm in religion, which is deemed reasonable in all the common affairs of life? Let a man be embarked in any thing that greatly involves his honour and interest throughout his life; a merchant in trade; a commander in war; a student in academic contests will he feel no anxieties? will he have no fluctuations of mind, no alternations of hope and fear, of joy and sorrow, according as his prospects brighten or are obscured? will the issue of his labours be to him such a matter of indifference, that he shall contemplate the probabilities of success or failure without any emotion? And if these diversified feelings are so called forth by things which pertain to this life, shall they have no scope for exercise in the things which relate to eternity? Call them by the name of Christian experience, or by any other name, they must have place in our souls; and if they have not, we are altogether dead in trespasses and sins. Let every one then take notice how he is affected with his everlasting concerns: for he can never have obtained mercy, who has not sought for mercy; nor he have received an answer to prayer, who never cried from his inmost soul to God. I must even go farther, and say, he has no hope, who never had a fear; nor shall he ever taste of joy, who has never been bowed down with penitential sorrow. As we deal with God, he will deal with us: “If we seek him, he will be found of us; but if we forsake him, he will forsake us.”]

2. Learn to estimate them by a right standard—

[If we judge of our emotions by their intenseness, or by the degree of elevation or depression produced by them, we shall deceive our own souls. The votaries of false religions are sometimes transported beyond the bounds of reason, and are agitated even to madness. A mistaken course of religion too, will often operate very strongly on the mind, and leave us, after all, in a, state of spiritual death. True religion is sober, discreet, practical: it consists in, or rather is inseparably connected with, “a spirit of love, and of power, and of a sound mind.” It directs to heaven; but does not lead us to neglect our earthly duties. It must be judged of by its practical effects. The grace that leaves us under the defilement of any “spiritual or fleshly filthiness,” is no grace. That alone comes from God, which leads to God; and that alone will have any saving efficacy, which assimilates us to “the Divine image in righteousness and true holiness.”]

3. Endeavour to improve them for the good of others—

[We are not proprietors of our talents, but stewards, to whom they are entrusted for the good of others. We must indeed be much on our guard against conceit, and talkativeness, and a readiness to draw attention to ourselves, and to make self the topic of our conversation. A person of this complexion is a very hateful and disgusting character: and too many such, it must be confessed, there are in the religious world. But whilst we avoid such a spirit as this, we must delight to communicate to others the blessings we have received, and to encourage from our own experience a diligent and patient waiting upon God. It is obvious, that if we can say, “What my eyes have seen, my ears have heard, and my hands have handled of the word of life, that same declare I unto you,” our words will come with tenfold weight. We repeat however, that a general communicating of our experiences in large companies is in our judgment highly inexpedient: it is a fruitful source of pride, discouragement, and hypocrisy. But in the confidence of friendship we may unbosom ourselves one to another, and declare, to the abundant edification both of ourselves and others, what God has done for our souls. In seasons of temptation and spiritual trouble, we may by such a communication administer unspeakable comfort to an afflicted brother [Note: 2 Corinthians 1:6.]. Nor is it necessary that we advert particularly to ourselves: if we give the result of our experience, the effect will be the same. The light we have received should not be hid under a bushel: if we have “freely received, we should freely give.”]


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

All ye that fear God; whether Israelites, or Gentiles proselyted to them. Let every Israelite take notice of what God hath done for the nation in general, and let the Gentiles observe God’s goodness to the children of Israel.

What he hath done for my soul; which he hath held in life, as he said, Psalms 66:16, in the greatest dangers of death.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-66.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16. A beautiful illustration of a personal confession and experience of divine grace.

All ye that fear God—He speaks to the covenant people, and such as fear God among the nations. Such only could understand or profit by the recital. Many among the heathen had learned to fear God by means of the miracles during the captivity, among whom were the kings Nebuchadnezzar, Darius, and Cyrus. Daniel 3:28-29; Daniel 4:37; Daniel 6:25-28; Ezra 1:1-4


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-66.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

my soul = me (emph.) Hebrew. nephesh. App-13.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-66.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Come and hear, all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.

Come and hear, all ye that fear God - answering to "come and see" (Psalms 66:5). As the former exhortation constrains men to fear God, by the thought of His 'terrible doings,' so this invites them by the consideration of His grace in having saved the speaker's soul. The former was addressed to those who had not heretofore feared God. This is addressed to them who already 'fear Him.' So the woman of Samaria (John 4:29). So Jesus desired the cured demoniac (Mark 5:19; Psalms 116:12-14).

And I will declare what he hath done for my soul. God had 'put the soul of his people in life,' restoring them from their dead state (Psalms 66:9).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) Come.—Refers back to Psalms 66:9.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-66.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Come and hear, all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.
Come
5; 34:2,11; 71:18; Malachi 3:16; 1 Timothy 1:15,16; 1 John 1:3
and I will
22:23,24; 32:5,6; 71:20; 1 Corinthians 15:8-10

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 66:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-66.html.

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