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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:20

 

 

Blessed be God, Who has not turned away my prayer Nor His lovingkindness from me.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Blessed be God - I therefore praise God, who has not turned aside my prayer, and who has not withheld his mercy from me. Thus he told them what God had done for his soul.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer - That is, It is fit that I should praise and adore God for the fact that he has graciously condescended to listen to the voice of my supplications.

Nor his mercy from me - There is no more proper ground of praise than the fact that God hears prayer - the prayer of poor, ignorant, sinful, dying men. When we consider how great is his condescension in doing this; when we think of his greatness and immensity; when we reflect that the whole universe is dependent on him, and that the farthest worlds need his care and attention; when we bear in mind that we are creatures of a day and “know nothing;” and especially when we remember how we have violated his laws, how sensual, corrupt, and vile our lives have been, how low and grovelling have been our aims and purposes, how we have provoked him by our unbelief, our ingratitude, and our hardness of heart - we can never express, in appropriate words, the extent of his goodness in hearing our prayers, nor can we find language which will properly give utterance to the praises due to his name for having condescended to listen to our cries for mercy.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-66.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer,.... Has not been angry against it, shut it out, or covered himself with a cloud that it might not pass through, which sometimes saints have complained of, Psalm 80:4; but graciously heard and received it;

nor his mercy from me; for that endures for ever, and is from everlasting to everlasting on them that fear the Lord, Psalm 103:17; all which require thankfulness and praise, which is here given.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-66.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

20Blessed be God! who hath not turned away my prayer He concludes the psalm, as he began it, with thanksgiving, and gives the reason of his not having met with a repulse; or, to take the figurative expression which he employs, of God’s not having turned away his prayer. This was, that he had not withdrawn his mercy. For it is entirely of his free grace that he is propitious, and that our prayers are not wholly ineffectual.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-66.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 66:20 Blessed [be] God, which hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy from me.

Ver. 20. Blessed be God, &c.] This is the conclusion of David’s syllogism, in this and the two former verses; and herein his logic is better than Aristotle’s.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-66.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

READER, while the Holy Ghost is here calling upon all lands to celebrate the praises of Jehovah, say what part can you, from a heart-felt satisfaction, bear in the song? Can you bless God for creation? So can the various characters of the earth. Can you bless God for providences? So can the Turk, the Jew, the infidel, the heretic: they can boast of their lands and vineyards, the fruitfulness of their soil, and the salubrity of their climate. Surely the Christian hath higher notes to sing besides these; and while he blesseth God as a God of creation and providence, he ought to bless him in louder strains of thanksgiving and love, as a God of redemption and grace.

Precious Jesus! let these be my notes: let my morning song, and evening hymn, while celebrating the nether springs of divine bounty, publish and proclaim the upper springs of grace and salvation; and all in thee! It is thou, Lord, that hast brought the glad tidings to thy people. It is thou alone that wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood. Let this be my song of rejoicing all the day; and may I have grace to sing forth the honor of thy name, and make thy praise to be glorious.

And oh! ye ransomed souls, ye who fear, and know, and love, my God! come hither, and hearken to my relation of his mercy. I was brought low, cast out, and ready to perish: Jesus saved me, Jesus loved me, and will love me! Oh! put your trust in him alway, ye people pour out your hearts before him; hang upon him; cleave to him; and never give over your humble suit until he hath heard and attended to the voice of your prayer, so that you can, and do cry out, as all the faithful gone before you have done, Blessed be God, who hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy from me.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-66.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Turned away, or rejected, or removed, to wit, from his sight and audience, but hath received and granted it.

His mercy: though he had now asserted his own innocency and sincere piety, yet he imputeth not God’s hearing of his prayers to that, but solely unto God’s grace and mercy.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-66.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

20. Hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy—Prayer and mercy comprehend all. They belong together. Prayer represents our true attitude and implies our whole duty to God, and mercy comprehends the whole work of God for us.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-66.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

turned away = turned away [from Himself]. Figure of speech Ellipsis. App-6.

mercy = lovingkindness, or grace.

To the chief Musician. See App-64.

on = relating to.

Neginoth = smitings: i.e. the smitings of Israel"s enemies by God. See App-65.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-66.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy from me.

Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer - namely, from Himself.

Nor his mercy from me. The hearing of our prayers is due, not to our merits, but to God's "mercy" (Muis). Nor his mercy from me. The hearing of our prayers is due, not to our merits, but to God's "mercy" (Muis).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(20) Who hath not turned . . .—i.e., he found himself able to pray, was not silenced. Notice the zeugma. God had not rejected his prayer nor withdrawn His grace.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-66.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy from me.
51:11; 86:12,13; 2 Samuel 7:14,15

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 66:20". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-66.html.

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