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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:5

 

 

Come and see the works of God, Who is awesome in His deeds toward the sons of men.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Come and see the works of God - Let every man lay God's wonderful dealings with us to heart; and compare our deliverance from Babylon to that of our fathers from Egypt.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Come and see the works of God - See the notes at Psalm 46:8, where substantially the same expression occurs. The idea is, “Come and see what God has done and is doing; come and learn from this what he is; and let your hearts in view of all this, be excited to gratitude and praise.” The particular reference here is to what God had done in delivering his people from their former bondage in Egypt Psalm 66:6; but there is, connected with this, the idea that he actually rules among the nations, and that in his providence he has shown his power to govern and sbdue them.

He is terrible in his doing - That is, His acts are suited to inspire awe and veneration. See the notes at Psalm 66:3.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-66.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

GOD'S MIGHTY DEEDS OF THE PAST RECALLED

"Come and see the works of God;

He is terrible in his doing toward the children of men.

He turned the sea into dry land;

They went through the river on foot:

There did we rejoice in him,

He ruleth by his might forever;

His eyes observe the nations:

Let not the rebellious exalt themselves.

(Selah)"

"He turned the sea into dry land" (Psalms 66:6). This is a reference to the passage of Israel though the Red Sea on dry land and the subsequent drowning of the army of Pharaoh in the same sea.

"They went through the river on foot" (Psalms 66:6). They not only did that, the children of Israel went over the Jordan on foot when the river was at flood stage! "It is noteworthy that throughout the Psalms no other historical event is viewed with as much awe and wonder as the Exodus crossing of the Red Sea. There are no less that eight of the Psalms that speak of it, Psalms 18; Psalms 66; Psalms 74; Psalms 77; Psalms 78; Psalms 89; Psalms 106, and Psalms 136."[9]

"Come, and see the works of God" (Psalms 66:5). Now the people who received this psalm could by no stretch of imagination "come and see" the mighty works of God mentioned in the same breath, namely, the crossing of the Red Sea and the crossing of Jordan. Then, what was it that the psalmist here invited the people to "Come, and see?" One possibility is that the nations were to come and look at the dead army of Sennacherib. There may have been some other mighty work of God just as wonderful as that; but it could have been that very thing.

"His eyes observe the nations ... let not the rebellious exalt themselves" (Psalms 66:7). Delitzsch gave the meaning here as follows: "God's eyes keep searching watch among the peoples; the rebellious who struggle against God's yoke and persecute God's people, had better not rise against Him. It will go with them if they do."[10]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-66.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Come and see the works of God,.... Of the Messiah, God manifest in the flesh; those divine works which he did when here on earth; his miraculous works, which were proofs of his deity and Messiahship; his preaching the Gospel, in so divine a manner as never man did; his works of obedience to the law, which were pure and perfect; the everlasting righteousness he wrought out for the justification of his people; and the great work of redemption and salvation finished by him, which none but God could ever have effected. This is an invitation to the inhabitants of all lands, where the Gospel should come with power, to take notice of and consider these works of Christ, and the glory of his might, wisdom, and grace in them, in order to engage them to sing his praise;

he is terrible in his doing toward the children of men; in his vengeance on the Jews, for disbelieving and rejecting him; in destroying antichrist, and pouring out the vials of his wrath on the antichristian states; and in the everlasting damnation of the wicked. So that as his other works in the former clause design these of grace, this doing of his respects his work, his strange work of judgment on his enemies; on account of which he is terrible to them, and reverenced by his people.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-66.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

c Come and see the works of God: [he is] terrible [in his] doing toward the d children of men.

(c) He refers to the slothful dullness of man, who is cold in the consideration of God's works.

(d) His providence is wonderful in maintaining their estate.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-66.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

5.Come and see the works of God An indirect censure is here passed upon that almost universal thoughtlessness which leads men to neglect the praises of God. Why is it that they so blindly overlook the operations of his hand, but just because they never direct their attention seriously to them? We need to be aroused upon this subject. The words before us may receive some explanation by referring to a parallel passage, Psalms 46:8. But the great scope of them is this, that the Psalmist would withdraw men from the vain or positively sinful and pernicious pursuits in which they are engaged, and direct their thoughts to the works of God. To this he exhorts them, chiding their backwardness and negligence. The expression, Come and see, intimates that what they blindly overlooked was open to observation; for were it otherwise with the works of God, this language would be inappropriate. He next points out what those works of God are to which he would have our attention directed; in general he would have us look to the method in which God governs the human family. This experimental or practical kind of knowledge, if I might so call it, is that which makes the deepest impression. (473) We find, accordingly, that Paul, (Acts 17:27) after speaking of the power of God in general, brings his subject to bear upon this one particular point, and calls upon us to descend into ourselves if we would discover the proofs of a present God. The last clause of the fifth verse I would not interpret with some as meaning that God was terrible above the children of men — superior to them in majesty — but rather that he is terrible towards them, evincing an extraordinary providence in their defense and preservation, as we have seen noticed, Psalms 40:5. Men need look no further, therefore, than themselves, in order to discover the best grounds for reverencing and fearing God. The Psalmist passes next from the more general point of his providence towards mankind at large, to his special care over his own Church, adverting to what he had done for the redemption of his chosen people. What he states here must be considered as only one illustration of many which he might have touched upon, and as intended to remind God’s people of the infinite variety of benefits with which their first and great deliverance had been followed up and confirmed. This appears obvious from what he adds, there we rejoiced in him It is impossible that the joy of that deliverance could have extended to him or any of the descendants of the ancient Israelites, unless it had partaken the nature of a pledge and illustration of the love of God to the Church generally. Upon that event he showed himself to be the everlasting Savior of his people; so that it proved a common source of joy to all the righteous.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-66.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 66:5 Come and see the works of God: [he is] terrible [in his] doing toward the children of men.

Ver. 5. Come and see] Venite, videte; he taketh good people by the hand, as it were, leading them to the sight of God’s stupendous proceedings, which may not be slighted, Isaiah 5:12.

Toward the children of men] For they are his chief care, and about them is his providence principally exercised.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-66.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See the works of God; consider them wisely and seriously, for God’s glory, and for your own good.

Toward the children of men; to all his enemies; whom he calls the children of men, partly in way of contempt, to show how unable they are either to avoid or resist the great God; and partly in opposition to his own people, who are frequently called the children of God.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-66.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5. Come and see the works of God—The address is still, as in Psalms 66:1-3, to the nations of the earth. The “works of God” here referred to particularly relate to the great political revolutions of the kingdoms attending the downfall of the Babylonian monarchy, and the uprising of that of the Medo-Persian, eventuating in the fulfilment of the divine purpose and promise toward his Church in its liberation and re-establishment. Compare Daniel 5:30-31; Daniel 6:28 with chap. 9 and Ezra 1.

Terrible in his doing—See Psalms 66:3.

Children of men—Poetically for men, mankind, especially the world as opposed to Israel.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-66.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Earth. Thou art the Father and ruler of thy people. Let all submit to the sweet yoke of Christ, Zacharias viii. 21.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-66.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Come and see. Note the correspondence of Psalms 66:16, "Come and hear".

children = sons.

men. Hebrew. "adam. App-14.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-66.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Come and see the works of God: he is terrible in his doing toward the children of men.

Come and see the works of God. Psalms 46:8 was probably written shortly before (cf. introductory remarks). The Church at all times appeals to the world, "Come and see" as Jesus said to the two disciples of John the Baptist, and Philip to Nathanael (John 1:39; John 1:46). God's marvels are to be seen by all, and seeing them is the first step toward believing in their Divine Author (Psalms 65:5-8).

He is terrible in his doing toward (Hebrew, upon) the children of men. Men are the objects upon whom His doings are performed.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Come and see the works of God: he is terrible in his doing toward the children of men.
Come
16; 46:8; 111:2; 126:1-3; Numbers 23:23
terrible
3; 99:3; Ezekiel 1:18

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 66:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-66.html.

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