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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:7

 

 

He rules by His might forever; His eyes keep watch on the nations; Let not the rebellious exalt themselves. Selah.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Be ruleth by his power - His omnipotence is employed to support his followers, and cast down his enemies.

His eyes behold the nations - He sees what they purpose, what they intend to do; and what they will do, if he restrain them not.

Let not the rebellious exalt themselves - They shall not succeed in their designs: they have their own aggrandizement in view, but thou wilt disappoint and cast them down.

Selah - Mark this. It is true.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He ruleth by his power for ever - literally, “Ruling by his power forever.” The idea is, that he does this constantly; in each age and generation. He never has ceased to rule; he never will. His dominion extends from age to age, and will stretch forward forever. The power which he evinced in delivering his people he retains now, and will retain forever. In that unchanging power, his people may confide; that unchanging power, the wicked should fear.

His eyes behold the nations - All nations; all people. He sees all their conduct. They can conceal nothing from him. They should, therefore, stand in awe. The wicked have much to fear from One who sees all that they do, and who has power to crush and destroy them. Compare the notes at Psalm 11:4.

Let not the rebellious exalt themselves - Be lifted up with pride, or feel secure. They cannot overcome an Almighty God; they cannot escape from his power. The word rebellious here has reference to those who are impatient under the restraints of the law of God, and who are disposed to east off his authority. The admonition is one that may be addressed to all who thus rebel against God, whether they are nations or individuals. Alike they must feel the vengeance of his arm, and fall beneath his power.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-66.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 66:7

He ruleth by His power for ever: His eyes behold the nations.

The nature and design of moral government

Everything around points us to a law or rule, by which creation is governed, and this implies a mind that cannot work in vain. But against this, “the rebellious exalt themselves.” And they do this because they are rebellious; atheism is of the heart more than of the reason.

I. Of the nature and design of moral government. And this government is--

1. Sovereign. This essential to the prevention of confusion.

2. Of irresistible power.

3. Universal in its extent.

4. Is, and must be, essentially benevolent.

Many object to this, and deny it. But let them remember the vast scale of God’s works, and how little we know. The next thing to be borne in mind is the tendency and purpose to bring all to a happy issue. This is an essential point in considering the moral government of God. All will end in the rectification of present disorders and in the bliss of creation.

II. Inferences from the foregoing.

1. Sin is the source of all misery.

2. The greatest benevolence consists in making God known.

3. We are unspeakably indebted to God for the revelation of His will, that in Christ all can have life eternal. (F. A. Cox, D. D. , LL. D.)

The government of God

I. The government of God is sustained by omnipotence. When revolutions rise, and changes take place in the empires of the world which affect the condition of millions now living, and which shape the destiny of coming generations, it is sheer folly to ascribe them solely or chiefly to the restlessness of the peoples, to the despotism of monarchs, or to the policy of statesmen. They are signs that the Divine power rules over, and that the Divine hand works out the destinies of men. He can curb the impetuous passions of men, or turn them into a channel in which they shall work out His great designs in complete, though unconscious, subservience to His will; He can put a hook in leviathan’s jaw, and cast down Antichrist from his seat; He can control the whirlwind in its stormy path, and check the mad fury of a long-oppressed people; He can arrest the lightning in its rapid flight and hush to silence the deep-voiced thunder; and He can stop the deadlier bolts of war and bid the angry nations be at peace.

II. The government of God is one of universal oversight. There is nothing, however great or trivial, which can transpire in His wide domain unobserved by Him. All events pass under His eye. All objects, the vast and the minute alike, are present to His view. “He telleth the number of the stars.” “The very hairs of our head are all numbered.” God is everywhere, omnipresence as well as omnipotence “belongs” to Him.

III. There are rebels against the divine government,

1. The exaltation of the creature may be through pride, through ambition, through vain desire, through unholy presumption, but whatever may be the secret feeling that prompts it, or whatever the form which it takes, the eye of God sees it, and His power can crush it when He will. It is vain for any of us, even in our most secret soul, to set ourselves against Him, for He track- the rebellious thought to its remotest hiding-place within us, nay, He knows it in its first formation in the chambers of the heart.

2. Man’s opposition to His Maker is as unreasonable as it is futile and hopeless. Why should we set ourselves against His law? Is He not our best Friend, our constant Benefactor, our loving Father? Is not His rule the rule of righteous love? Is not His throne the throne of grace? Is not His law a law of liberty, and in keeping of it is there not great reward? (F. Stephens.)

God and the nations

The God of individuals is the God also of nations; the law of righteousness which applies to individuals applies also to nations; and nations are accountable to God, and must be judged by Him just as surely as individuals. Men are slow to believe this truth. They seem to think that there is one law for the individual and another law for the nation, and that it is vain to expect that a nation should be ruled by the teaching of the New Testament and the Sermon on the Mount. Great statesmen are not ashamed, even in Christian England, to go in direct opposition to that teaching, to appeal to the lowest, the most brutal, the fighting instincts of the people; to urge them to cherish and practise the spirit of retaliation, and to encourage them to hurl defiance against all the nations of the world. But surely the teaching of our Lord should rule nations as well as individual men; and nations should seek to be guided not by the old law, which says, “An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth,” but by the new and diviner law, which says that men should do unto others whatsoever they would that others should do to them. God sits on the throne of the universe. The sceptre of universal dominion is in the hands of righteousness. The eyes of the Lord keep watch on the nations, and nations must be judged by the righteous judgment of God. (G. Hunsworth, M. A.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 66:7". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-66.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He ruleth by his power forever,.... Christ is the Ruler in Israel, King over his holy hill of Zion; who must reign till all enemies are put under his feet. He rules in the kingdom of nature and providence by his power, and does whatsoever he pleases; nor can any stay his hand. He rules in the kingdom of grace, in the hearts of his people, by his efficacious grace; which makes them willing, in the day of his power, to be subject to him; and in the latter day he will take to himself his great power and reign, when he will be King for ever. His kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, it shall never be subverted nor usurped; nor will he in it be succeeded by another; he will reign to the end of the world, throughout the thousand years, with his saints on earth, and then with them in heaven for evermore. The Targum renders it,

"over the world;'

over the whole world; for Christ will be King over all the earth in the latter day, Zechariah 14:9;

his eyes behold the nations; the antichristian states. He sees all the idolatry and wickedness committed in them; and his eyes will be as flames of fire to destroy them, when the time is come. The allusion is to God's looking through the pillar of fire and cloud upon the Egyptians in the Red sea, and troubling them, Exodus 14:24;

let not the rebellious exalt themselves. That are rebels against Christ, would not have him to reign over them; antichrist, who exalts himself above all that is called God, and all his followers. Or, "they shall not exalt themselves"F1אל ירימו למו "haudquaquam sese exultabunt", Tigurine version, Musculus, & Gejerus. : or, as the Targum,

"they shall not be exalted in themselves for ever;'

see Revelation 18:7.

Selah; on this word; see Gill on Psalm 3:2.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-66.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He ruleth by his power for ever; his eyes behold the nations: let not the rebellious e exalt themselves. Selah.

(e) He proves that God will extend his grace also to the Gentiles, because he punishes among them such as will not obey his calling.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-66.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

behold the nations — watch their conduct.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

7.He ruleth by his power over the world The Hebrew word עולם, olam, which I have translated the world, signifies occasionally an age, or eternity; (474) but the first sense seems to agree best with the context, and the meaning of the words is, that God is endued with the power necessary for wielding the government of the world. What follows agrees with this, that his eyes behold the nations Under the law, Judea was the proper seat of his kingdom; but his providence always extended to the world at large; and the special favor shown to the posterity of Abraham, in consideration of the covenant, did not prevent him from extending an eye of providential consideration to the surrounding nations. As an evidence of his care reaching to the different countries round, he takes notice of the judgments which God executed upon the wicked and the ungodly. He proves that there was no part of the human family which God overlooked, by referring to the fact of the punishment of evil-doers. There may be much in the Divine administration of the world calculated to perplex our conclusions; but there are always some tokens to be seen of his judgments, and these sufficiently clear to strike the eye of an acute and attentive observer.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-66.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 66:7 He ruleth by his power for ever; his eyes behold the nations: let not the rebellious exalt themselves. Selah.

Ver. 7. He ruleth by his power] As sole sovereign, universal monarch, αυτοκρατωρ, παντοκρατωρ. Sesostris, king of Egypt, would needs be styled κοσμοκρατωρ, emperor of the whole world (Herod. l. 2); he lived about the time of Samson, and perished by the hands of his own householdservants.

His eyes behold the nations] For which purpose they run to and fro through the earth, 2 Chronicles 16:9.

Let not the rebellious, &c.] Heb. the off fallen, froward, and refractory persons; these shall soon be repressed and crest fallen.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-66.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 66:7. Let not the rebellious exalt themselves The rebellious or refractory; i.e. Pharaoh, whose stubbornness and pride occasioned his ruin. But the caution was still as necessary as ever. God's eyes were still looking up and down through the nations, to rescue his prisoners, how haughtily soever their persecutors might behave toward them. Mudge.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-66.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The same power which God had and put forth for his people in ancient time, he still hath in as great vigour as ever, and is not at all weakened by age, and is as able and ready to act for them now as ever he was; which he hath showed by this late and glorious instance.

His eyes behold the nations; he sees all their secret and subtle devices, and can and will defeat them, when he sees fit.

Let not the rebellious exalt themselves; lift up their hands against God, or against his people. Or, the rebellious (i.e. those people which rebel against this almighty God and his laws) shall not exalt themselves, as they vainly hope and design to do; but shall be brought down and destroyed, as is hereby implied.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-66.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7. His eyes behold—His eyes watch. A police-watch is intended. Thus exact knowledge and perfect power leave no hope of impunity.

Nations— The Hebrew word is almost exclusively used of the Gentiles, or heathen nations, throughout the Bible. It is to these he has chiefly addressed himself hitherto. Psalms 66:8 opens a new division of the psalm, with new associations.

Let not the rebellious—A caution to the haughty monarchs who contemned Israel. See Psalms 2:3; Psalms 2:12; 2 Kings 18:29-35; Daniel 3:15


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-66.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

c). A Warning To The Nations To Remember In The Light Of His Historic Activity That He Is Observing Them (Psalms 66:7).

Psalms 66:7

‘He rules by his might for ever,

His eyes observe the nations,

Let not the rebellious exalt themselves. [Selah.’

And just as God observed what the Egyptians were seeking to do at the Red Sea, so are the nations to recognise that He observes their activity against His people as well. He rules the world by His power, and His eyes sees all that they do (compare Zechariah 4:10). Thus those who rebel against Him by exalting themselves over His people should watch their step. They should recognise that He is not unaware of what they do. Such exaltation of themselves by nations against His people, and the resulting repercussions, are echoed in Isaiah 36-37. Our God sees all.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/psalms-66.html. 2013.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 66:7. He ruleth by his power for ever — The same power which God possessed and exerted for his people in ancient times, he still possesses in as great vigour as ever, and is as able and ready to act for them as ever he was: which he hath shown in this late and glorious instance. His eyes behold the nations — He sees all their secret and subtle devices, and can and will defeat them, when he sees fit. Let not the rebellious exalt themselves — Lift up their hands against God or his people. Or, the rebellious; that is, those that rebel against this Almighty God and his laws, shall not exalt themselves, as they vainly hope and design to do, but shall be brought down and destroyed, as is here implied.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-66.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Fruit, after rain; or, in a spiritual sense, Jesus Christ, the root, or bud of Jesse, (Isaias iv. 2.; Calmet) born in Judea, (Berthier) of the holy Virgin. (St. Jerome) --- God. The triple repetition of God's name, insinuates the blessed Trinity, (Haydock; Fathers) and the prophet's earnestness. (Calmet) --- The faith of the Trinity is to be preached throughout the world, (Haydock) for the salvation of nations. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-66.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Selah. Repeating the exhortation to praise, and connecting the two halves of the Psalm. (App-66.)


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-66.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He ruleth by his power for ever; his eyes behold the nations: let not the rebellious exalt themselves. Selah.

His eyes behold the nations - `His eyes look forth among the people.' From his heavenly watch-tower He beholds all the enemy's proud and malicious efforts against His Church.

Let not the rebellious exalt themselves. The "rebellious" are the apostate antichristian faction, and all who obey not the Gospel. I warn them against a contest with Omnipotence: they cannot elude His eye nor resist "his power, whereby he ruleth for ever."

His power, whereby he ruleth for ever (cf. the same advice, Isaiah 27:4-5). The Hebrew is, 'let them not exalt (themselves) for themselves.' What they intend to their own elevation shall turn out to their own shame. So in the Hebrew, Psalms 58:7.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) His eyes behold.—Better, his eyes keep watch on the nations. God is, as it were, Israel’s outpost, ever on the alert to warn and defend them against surrounding nations.

Let not . . .—Literally, the rebellious, let them not exalt for themselves, where we may supply “horn” as in Psalms 75:4-5, or “head” as in Psalms 3:3; Psalms 110:7. For the rebellious, comp. Psalms 68:6.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-66.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He ruleth by his power for ever; his eyes behold the nations: let not the rebellious exalt themselves. Selah.
ruleth
62:11; Daniel 4:35; 6:26,27; Matthew 6:13; 28:18
his eyes
11:4; 33:13; 2 Chronicles 16:9
let
2:10-12; 52:1-5; 73:3-12; 75:4,5; Exodus 18:11; Job 9:4; Isaiah 10:7-16; Isaiah 37:28,29; Daniel 5:20-28

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 66:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-66.html.

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