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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 66:9

 

 

Who keeps us in life And does not allow our feet to slip.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Which holdeth our soul in life - Literally, "he who placeth our soul בחיים bachaiyim, in lives." We are preserved alive, have health of body, and feel the life of God in our hearts.

And suffereth not her feet to be moved - Keeps us steadfast in his testimonies. We have our life, our liberty, and our religion. O, what hath the Lord wrought for us! "Make, therefore, the voice of his praise to be heard." Let God and man know you are thankful.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-66.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Which holdeth our soul in life - Margin, as in Hebrew, putteth. That is, He has put (or placed) us in a state of safety. The word rendered “in life” means literally “among the living.” The word soul here is equivalent to us - ourselves; and the idea is, that he keeps us among the living. What is here said of this special deliverance is true of all people at all times, that they owe the fact that they are among the living to the care of God; or, it is because he puts them among the living, or keeps them alive.

And suffereth not our feet to be moved - That is, from their firm position of safety. The idea is taken from one who is walking, and who is kept from slipping or falling.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-66.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Psalms 66:9

Which holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our feet to be moved.

The safety of the saints

Now, in these words we notice--

I. The life. “He holdeth our soul in life.” This is--

1. A life of purity in opposition to sin.

2. Of plenty in opposition to a life of poverty.

3. Of godly exercise, or exercise unto godliness.

4. Of pleasing discovery.

II. The preservation. “He holdeth,” etc. This applies to all the four ideas adverted to.

III. The fixation. “He suffereth not our feet to be moved.” Now, how is it our feet cannot be moved finally? Why, because we have, in salvation matters, “a covenant ordered in all things and sure.” (James Wells.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Psalms 66:9". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/psalms-66.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Which holdeth our soul in life,.... Or, "putteth our soul in life"F2השם "qui posuit", V. L. Pagninus, Musculus, Vatablus; "ponene", Montanus; "qui ponit", Gejerus, Michaelis. , or "among the living", which is not to be understood of infusing a living soul in man, nor of the preservation of natural life, which is common to all men; but of appointing and ordaining them unto eternal life, as the Targum; and of procuring it for them by Christ; and of implanting a principle of spiritual life in them, by his Spirit and grace; and of the preservation of the principle of life, that it be not lost; and of giving them a right and title to eternal life, and that itself: all which are a sufficient reason, and powerful argument, to bless our God, and praise his name. It follows:

and suffereth not our feet to be moved; that is, not to be greatly moved; or if moved so as to slip and fall, yet not so as to fall finally and totally; see Psalm 55:22.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-66.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Which f holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our feet to be moved.

(f) He signifies some special benefit that God had showed to his Church of the Jews, in delivering them from some great danger: of which he promises that the Gentiles will also be partakers.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-66.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

in life — literally, “putteth our soul in life”; that is, out of danger (Psalm 30:3; Psalm 49:15).

to be moved — (Compare Psalm 10:6; Psalm 55:22).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-66.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 66:9 Which holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our feet to be moved.

Ver. 9. Which holdeth our soul in life] Heb. putteth, that is, bestoweth life on us, preserveth it, restoreth it. Some think this psalm was made upon David’s deliverance from the giant that sought to kill him, 2 Samuel 21:16.

And suffereth not our feet to be moved] David gave back divers paces, say the Hebrews, but was seasonably rescued by Abishai, who slew the Philistine.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-66.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Which holdeth our soul in life; who by a succession of miracles of mercy hath kept us alive in the midst of a thousand deaths, to which we were exposed, and hath restored us to life, when we were like dead men, and dry bones scattered at the mouth of the grave.

To be moved, to wit, so as to fall into mischief and utter ruin, as our enemies designed.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-66.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9. Holdeth our soul in life—Setteth up, placeth firmly, our soul in the life; that is, in the true condition and life of thy covenant people; a literal description of an anastasis, or resurrection, where the Hebrew שׂום, (seem,) to place, put, set up, and the corresponding Septuagint θεμενου, answer to the New Testament αναστασις, resurrection, “the person or thing put, [placed, set up,] regarded as standing erect rather than lying down.” Delitzsch. This idea is here sustained by the parallelism, thus:

Placing [erecting] our soul in the life,

And hast not given over [delivered, abandoned] our foot to the sliding.

The firm, erect posture is contrasted with the tottering and sliding condition. Comp. Psalms 9:13, and the use of שׂום, (set up,) Psalms 74:4; Job 5:11, et.al. This mode of speech, which is not unfrequent, belongs to a people who had an idea of the resurrection of the human body.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-66.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

our soul. Hebrew. nephesh. App-13. Some codices, with seven early printed editions, read plural

feet. So some codices, with three early printed editions; others read "foot".


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-66.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) Which holdeth . . .—The LXX. literally, which putteth our soul into life, i.e., keeps us alive, as the parallelism shows.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-66.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Which holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our feet to be moved.
holdeth
Heb. putteth.
22:29; 1 Samuel 25:29; Acts 17:28; Colossians 3:3,4
suffereth
37:23,24; 62:2,6; 94:18; 112:6; 121:3; 125:3; 1 Samuel 2:9

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-66.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Psalm 66:9

"Who holds our soul in life." Psalm 66:9

"Our lives are in his hands, and he keeps our feet from stumbling." Psalm 66:9

It is indeed an unspeakable mercy for the heirs of promise that the life given them in Christ and communicated by the Holy Spirit to their souls cannot be extinguished. It may sink very low—one can hardly say how low, but so low as to sink out of sight and almost out of feeling; and yet if it has once been breathed into the soul from the mouth of God, it can never die.

Still it is most desirable that this divine life should be maintained in strength and vigor, and not sink so low as to be scarcely perceptible either to ourselves or others, for if Song of Solomon , we have little comfort of it in our own breast, and are of little use or service to the people of God. It is a sad thing to be satisfied with a low, lean, and lifeless state of soul, or be placing our religion in external activity and zealous attention to forms and mere externals, just to preserve a clean outside, when within there is little else but darkness, bondage, and death. How the Lord seems, as it were, obliged to plunge us into trials and afflictions to bring us out of carnality and death, and to keep us from settling on our lees like Moab!


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Psalms 66:9". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/psalms-66.html.

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