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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 75:2

 

 

"When I select an appointed time, It is I who judge with equity.

Adam Clarke Commentary

When I shall receive the congregation - When the proper time is come that the congregation, my people of Israel, should be brought out of captivity, and received back into favor, I shall not only enlarge them, but punish their enemies. They shall be cut off and cast out, and become a more miserable people than those whom they now insult. I will destroy them as a nation, so that they shall never more be numbered among the empires of the earth.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-75.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

When I shall receive the congregation - The marginal rendering is, “Take a set time.” The phrase is thus rendered in most of the versions. So the Septuagint, “When I take the time” - ὅταν λάβω καιρὸν hotan labō kairon So the Vulgate, “When I accept the time.” So Luther, “When in its own time.” So De Wette, “When I take the time.” According to this interpretation, this is the language of God, as if implying that, although “the earth” was then “dissolved,” or although disorders were allowed to exist, yet he would take a set time, or take the appointed time for judgment, and would pronounce a sentence on the conduct of people, and deal with them in a righteous manner, punishing the rebellious, and vindicating his own cause. The proper interpretation of the passage turns on the meaning of the Hebrew word rendered in the text “congregation” - מועד mô‛êd See the word explained in the notes at Psalm 74:8. It may mean a set time, an appointed season, 1 Samuel 13:8, 1 Samuel 13:11; or a coming together, an assembly, Job 30:23; or a place of assemblage, as the tabernacle, etc.; Exodus 27:21; Exodus 40:22; Psalm 74:8. It may, therefore, be applied to the congregation of the Jewish people - the nation considered as an assemblage for the worship of God; and the idea of taking this, or receiving this, may be applied to the act of assuming authority or sovereignty over the people, and hence, the language may be used to denote the entrance on the discharge of the duties of such sovereignty. The language would be ap plicable to one who had the right of such an elevation to power - a prince - an heir apparent - in a time when his right was disputed; when there was an organized opposition to him; or when the nation was in a state of anarchy and confusion. It seems to me that this supposition best accords with the proper meaning of the language, and with the scope of the psalm.

I will judge uprightly - I will put down all this opposition to law. I will deal with exact justice between man and man. I will restore order, and the supremacy of law, to the state. The language, therefore, according to this interpretation, is not the language of God, but that of a prince having a right to the throne, and about to ascend it in a time of great misrule and disorder.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-75.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"When I shall find the set time,

I will judge uprightly.

The earth and all the inhabitants thereof are dissolved:

I have set up the pillars of it.

(Selah)"

"When I shall find the set time" (Psalms 75:2). Everything in the whole universe is, as it were, scheduled according to the time God has set for it. In the life of Christ, one cannot fail to remember the frequent words of Jesus, "My time is not yet come." The final Judgment Day itself has already been "appointed" by Almighty God (Acts 17:31). Christ was not born until "the fullness of time" had come; and all such declarations in the Bible indicate that God has set a time-clock monitor upon the entire progress of history.

McCaw stated that, "The LXX associates this psalm with the invasion of Sennacherib,"[4] and if that is correct, "Jerusalem was humbled in the dust, and at the very `eleventh hour' as men reckon things, was the time when God acted."[5]

God never acts because a situation looks desperate, but because the appointed time has come.

This principle has an application especially in the affairs of history.

"When moral foundations are undermined and seem to be destroyed by the violence and injustice of men, The Judge of all the Earth has not abdicated his throne. At the correct time, he will restore the balance, capping a `Thousand-Year Reich' with a Nuremburg."[6]

More recently we have seen the incredible collapse of the madness known as Communism, and the "Mother of All Battles" turned into the "Mother of All Defeats." God still rules in the kingdoms of men.

The wickedness of men being what it is, the world itself could not long stand, except for the providence of God. "God is the stabilizing strength in the whole picture of human life on earth. God's power wielded through his sacred institutions shores up our godless society, by his eternal Truth, and by his guiding hand upon events and upon the lives of certain men."[7]

Ash expressed it beautifully in these words: "Behind all that trembles is that which is beyond any shock. God, upon whom all order moral and otherwise is dependent can surely be trusted to judge with equity."[8]

There are times in history when it appears that the total ruin of all culture and civilization is threatened; but, "Men cannot so disrupt a world that still belongs to God, and whose order is upheld by Him."[9]

"The earth and all the inhabitants thereof are dissolved" (Psalms 75:3). Some scholars take these words as a metaphor of the collapse of human civilization, but we believe there is a glimpse here of the Eternal Judgment. This does not deny the other interpretation but suggests it as a valid overtone looking to that Eternal Morning.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-75.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

When I shall receive the congregation,.... Some render it, from the Arabic signification of the word, "the promise"F15מועד "promissa", Schultens animadv. p. 174. "festi dona", Gusset. p. 334. ; the Spirit promised, the gifts of the Spirit, which Christ received for men, and gave to men, whereby he executes the judgment or government of the church committed to him: others the time, so the Septuagint, Vulgate Latin, Ethiopic, Syriac, and Arabic versions, to which agrees the Targum, the word signifying a set appointed time, Psalm 102:14, and so may respect the time appointed for the judgment of the world, which when come, Christ will execute in a most righteous manner, as follows; see Acts 17:31, but whereas the people of Israel met at the door of the tabernacle, which from thence was called "Ohel Moed", the tabernacle of the congregation; hence the word is used for a congregation, and here designs the general assembly and church of the firstborn written in heaven, even all the elect of God; these were received by Christ of his Father in eternity, when he espoused them to himself, and undertook the care of them; and they are received by him, one by one, in effectual calling; and in like manner are they received by him into glory at death; but when they are all gathered in, and are prepared for him as a bride for her husband, then will he receive them all in a body, and present them to himself a glorious church during the thousand years' reign; upon which will proceed the judgment of the wicked; see Revelation 20:5,

I will judge uprightly; in equity, in strict justice, in the most righteous manner, rendering to every man according to his works; hence the future judgment is called a righteous one, and so is the Judge; no injustice will be done to men, but the strictest integrity, uprightness, and impartiality, will be observed in pronouncing the several sentences on the righteous and on the wicked, and in adjudging them to their several places and states.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-75.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

c When I shall receive the congregation I will judge uprightly.

(c) When I see my time (says God) to help your miseries, I will come and set all things in good order.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-75.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

When I shall receive the congregation I will judge uprightly.

Receive — The whole congregation, all the tribes.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-75.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

2.When I shall have taken the congregation. The Hebrew verb יעד, yaäd, signifies to appoint a place or day, and the noun מועד, moed, derived from it, which is here used, signifies both holy assemblies, or a congregation of the faithful assembled together in the name of the Lord, and festival, or appointed solemn days. As it is certain that God is here introduced as speaking, either of these senses will agree with the scope of the passage. It may be viewed as denoting either that having gathered his people to himself, he will restore to due order matters which were in a state of distraction and confusion, or else that he will make choice of a fit time for exercising his judgment. In abandoning his people for a season to the will of their enemies, he seems to forsake them and to exercise no care about them; so that they are like a flock of sheep which is scattered, and wanders hither and thither without a shepherd. It being his object, then, to convey in these words a promise that he would remedy such a confused state of things, he very properly commences with the gathering together of his Church. If any choose rather to understand the word מועד, moed, as referring to time (254) God is to be understood as admonishing his people, that it is their bounden duty to exercise patience until he actually show that the proper time is come for correcting vices, since he only has the years and days in his own power, and knows best the fit juncture and moment for performing this work. The interpretation to which I most incline is, That, to determine the end and measure of calamities, and the best season of rising up for the deliverance of his people, — matters, the determination of which men would willingly claim for themselves, — is reserved by God in his own hands, and is entirely subject to his own will. At the same time, I am very well satisfied with the former interpretation, which refers the passage to the gathering together of the Church. Nor ought it to seem absurd or harsh that God is here introduced as returning an answer to the prayers of his people. This graphic representation, by which they are made to speak in the first verse, while he is introduced as speaking in the second, is much more forcible than if the prophet had simply said, that God would at length, and at the determined time, show himself to be the protector of his Church, and gather her together again when she should be scattered and rent in pieces. The amount, in short, is, that although God may not succor his own people immediately, yet he never forgets them, but only delays until the fit time arrive, the redress which he has in readiness for them. To judge righteously, is just to restore to a better state matters which are embroiled and disordered. Thus Paul says,

“Seeing it is a righteous thing with God to recompense tribulation to them that trouble you; and to you who are troubled rest with us, when the Lord Jesus shall be revealed from heaven with his mighty angels.” (2 Thessalonians 1:6)

God, therefore, declares that it is his office to set in order and adjust those things which are in confusion, that, entertaining this expectation, we may be sustained and comforted by means of it in all our afflictions.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-75.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 75:2 When I shall receive the congregation I will judge uprightly.

Ver. 2. When I shall receive the congregation] i.e. The government of all the twelve tribes, as I believe I shall do shortly, according to God’s promise to me by Samuel.

I will judge uprightly] That a man is in truth, that he is in his own particular place and station, that he is really, that he is relatively.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-75.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 75:2. When I shall receive, &c.— When I find the appointed time, I execute righteous judgment; Mudge: who observes, that this and the following verse contain the words of God, in answer to the first verse: that now the time was come for him to do justice, and therefore the earth melted before him. This it might well do, as he had first set up the pillars of it; for so the last clause of the third verse should be rendered. It stood firmly only by his order, and therefore must be dissolved whenever he pleases.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-75.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

When I shall receive the congregation, to wit, the whole congregation, or body of thy people, to wit, all the tribes; which are now distracted and disordered by a civil war, which is a great hinderance to the administration of justice. Or, when I shall receive or obtain the appointment, i.e. what God hath appointed and promised to me, to wit, the full and firm possession of the kingdom; or, the time or place appointed by God for that work. Some make these and the following passages the words of God concerning his church or people; which seems not probable; partly because he speaks of God in the third person, as one distinct from him that speaks these words, Psalms 75:7,8; and partly because it is evident that one and the same person speaks from hence to the end of the Psalm, and the ninth verse cannot be spoken by God.

I will judge uprightly; I will not use my power tyrannically and wickedly, as Saul did, and as most other princes do; but holily and righteously, for the good of my people.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-75.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. When I shall receive the congregation—We must certainly recognise the historic ground of Psalms 75:2-3, before any spiritual or prophetic sense is admissible. The king is speaking to God. He states what he will do when he shall take his seat in the assembly, namely, perform the highest function of his office faithfully. “When I shall receive,” or take the place of authority in the stated assembly for the administration of justice, I will judge uprightly. He first thanks God for deliverance, then his heart turns to his distracted people, and, as God’s minister to them, he pledges uprightness of decision. This is part of his gratitude offering. All nations have had their times of restoring order and prosperity after the shattering effects of war, and this example of the pious king of Judah is worthy of universal adoption as the soundest state policy.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-75.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 75:2. When I shall receive the congregation — The first verse was spoken by many persons, We give thanks, &c.; here the speaker is one, and that one is plainly a ruler, who promises that when he shall have received the congregation, or, as מועד may be properly rendered, an appointed, or fit time, or season; that is, when he shall be established in power and authority, at a fit time and place, he will judge uprightly, and introduce a thorough reformation into a kingdom which, as the following verse makes manifest, stood greatly in need of it. From these circumstances Dr. Horne, with several other commentators, thinks it probable “David is speaking here of his advancement to the throne of Israel, and the intended rectitude of his administration when he should be settled thereon.”


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-75.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Judea. Hebrew, "Juda." (Haydock) --- This shews that the psalm was composed after the separation of the tribes, (Calmet) though not invincibly; as the names of Juda and Israel were used in David's time. (Haydock) --- The divine worship was almost confined to the promised land till the birth of Christ; whose gospel has diffused light throughout the world. (St. Augustine; Calmet, &c.) --- See Jeremias lx. 23. (Berthier) --- A Christian is the true Juda, or "Confessor." (Menochius) --- God was known to some philosophers, but not by such special benefits. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-75.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

I shall receive the congregation = The set time has come, &c.

I = I, even I. Very emphatic.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-75.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

When I shall receive the congregation I will judge uprightly.

When I shall receive the congregation, I will judge uprightly - the reply of Yahweh to the thanksgiving prayer of His people. The abruptness of the introduction of the new Speaker, God, marks how immediate is His response to His people's believing prayer, even "while they are yet speaking" (Isaiah 65:24). Herein is set forth in detail the subject of the Church's praise in Psalms 75:1 - namely, God's "name, is near." You may be thus full of thanksgivings,' God replies, 'for when I shall, etc. 'When I shall have taken under my charge the congregation of my people, I will judge their enemies.' So Christ comes again to take the elect Church to Himself, and shall at that time judge her enemies (Revelation 11:12; Revelation 11:15; Revelation 11:17; Revelation 19:7). The English version takes the Hebrew in the sense in which the word is translated in Psalms 74:4, 'congregation.' But the context and the parallels, Psalms 102:13 (the same Hebrew [ mow`eed (Hebrew #4150)], "the set time," for the Lord to arise and have mercy on Zion), and all the ancient versions, the Septuagint, Syriac, Chaldaic, etc., favor the translation, (see margin) 'When (or for, Hengstenberg) I shall get (implying earnest desire for it) the set time,' etc. (cf. Daniel 8:19; Daniel 11:27; Daniel 11:35; Daniel 12:8; Daniel 12:12-13; Habakkuk 2:3).

"The times and seasons which the Father hath put in His own power;" the time for "restoring again the kingdom to Israel" (Acts 1:6-7), when the measure of the enemy's iniquity shall be full, and "the times of the Gentiles fulfilled" (Luke 21:24). God does nothing precipitately or prematurely, yet in due time "He will avenge His own elect, though He bear long with them" (Luke 18:7). Compare the pagan sentiment, 'Sera tamen tacitis paena venit pedibus;' also Valerius Maximus, 'Tardidatem poence gravitate compensat.' When the chastisement of His Church is completed, He then punishes finally and irretrievably the enemy (Isaiah 10:12). This and other phrases in the psalm show that, besides the present reference to Hezekiah's and Seunacherib's times, there was designed by the Spirit an ulterior reference to the Lord's final coming to glorify His saints, and to judge His and their enemies. I will Judge uprightly - taking the kingdom out of the hands of those who have abused their trust, and not judged uprightly (Psalms 1:1-6; Psalms 58:1).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-75.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) When I.—Rather, When I have chosen my time, I will judge uprightly. This sense: “my time” being shown by the emphatic “I” of the Hebrew. (Comp. Acts 17:31.) The word rendered in the Authorised Version “congregation” (moed), has plainly here its first derivative sense of a set time, or “occasion.” (Comp. Psalms 102:13; Habakkuk 2:3.) So LXX. and Vulg. here; but Symmachus gives “synagogue.”

It is quite clear that the speaker of these words is God Himself, who suddenly, as in Psalms 46:10, breaks in with the announcement of judgment. But how far the Divine utterance extends in the psalm is not quite clear. Some end it with Psalms 75:3; others with Psalms 75:5.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-75.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

When I shall receive the congregation I will judge uprightly.
When
78:70-72; 101:2; 2 Samuel 2:4; 5:3; 8:15; 23:3,4
receive the congregation
or, take a set time.
Ecclesiastes 3:17; John 7:6; Acts 1:7; 17:31

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 75:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-75.html.

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