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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 75:4

 

 

"I said to the boastful, `Do not boast,' And to the wicked, `Do not lift up the horn;

Adam Clarke Commentary

I said unto the fools - I have given the idolatrous Chaldeans sufficient warning to abandon their idols, and worship the true God; but they would not. I have also charged the wicked, to whom for a season I have delivered you because of your transgressions, not to lift up their horn - not to use their power to oppress and destroy. They have, notwithstanding, abused their power in the persecutions with which they have afflicted you. For all these things they shall shortly be brought to an awful account. On the term horn, see the note on Luke 1:69.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-75.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I said unto the fools - To the wicked people in rebellion. Folly and wickedness in the Bible are synonymous terms, as they are identical in fact. See the notes at Psalm 14:1.

Deal not foolishly - Act not foolishly; carry not out your wicked plans. Do not pursue your schemes of wickedness and folly, for they cannot be successful, and they will only tend to involve you in ruin.

And to the wicked - The wicked people engaged in rebellion - either against a lawful human government, or against God.

Lift not up the horn - The horn is a symbol of strength. Compare Job 16:15; Daniel 7:7-8, Daniel 7:11, Daniel 7:21; Daniel 8:5, Daniel 8:8-9, Daniel 8:21. This is to be understood as the language of the person represented as speaking in the psalm - whether a prince, or whether God himself. It is counsel addressed to the wicked, that they should not attempt to put forth their strength in the accomplishment of their evil purposes. The reason given for this is stated in Psalm 75:6, namely, that success does not depend on chance, or on human power, but must come from God.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-75.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"I said unto the arrogant,

Deal not arrogantly;

And to the wicked, Lift not up the horn:

Lift not up your horn on high;

Speak not with a stiff neck.

For neither from the east, nor from the west,

Nor yet from the south, cometh lifting up."

Some interpreters ascribe the words of these verses to the psalmist, or to the "congregation," but we believe Delitzsch is correct. "The utterance of God is also continued after the Selah. It is not the people of God who turn to the enemies with words of warning; it is God himself who speaks."[10]

"Lift not up the horn" (Psalms 75:4). This means that, "One should not vaunt his own powers."[11] Rawlinson gave the meaning as, "Be not fierce and menacing like a bull threatening with his horns."[12]

"Neither from east ... west ... south ... cometh lifting up" (Psalms 75:6). The significance of the omission of "north" here lies in the fact that, "Foreign invasions of Israel generally came from the north; and deliverance would logically have been expected from some other direction."[13]

McCaw suggested that this affords presumptive evidence that the threatened destruction of Jerusalem by Sennacherib might have been the occasion.[14]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-75.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I said unto the fools,.... To the vain gloriosos, proud boasters, mockers, and scoffers at the day of judgment, and burning of the world:

deal not foolishly; by glorying in themselves, boasting of their riches, and trusting in them; singing a requiem to themselves on account of their abundance, and by putting away the evil day far from them:

and to the wicked, lift not up the horn; of power, grandeur, and wealth, and use it to the injury of others; or be so elated with it as to look with disdain on others; or imagine they shall always continue in this exalted state, as antichrist the horned beast does, Revelation 18:7, the allusion is to horned beasts, particularly harts, which lift up their heads and horns in great prideF16Vid. "Suidam in voce" εκεπουτιας. : the phrase signifies to behave proudly and haughtily.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-75.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I said unto the fools, Deal not foolishly: and to the wicked, Lift not up the horn:

I said — I charged them.

Deal not — Desist from your practices.

Lift not up — Do not carry yourselves scornfully and maliciously.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-75.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

4.I said to the fools, Act not foolishly. (255) After he has set the office of God full in his own view and in the view of the faithful, he now triumphs over all the ungodly, whom he impeaches of madness and blind rage, the effect of their despising God, which leads them to indulge to excess in pride and self-gloriation. This holy boasting to which he gives utterance depends upon the judgment, which in the name of God he denounced to be at hand; for when the people of God expect that he is coming to execute judgment, and are persuaded that he will not long delay his coming, they glory even in the midst of their oppressions. The madness of the wicked may boil over and swell with rage, and pour forth floods to overwhelm them; but it is enough for them to know that their life is protected by the power of God, who can with the most perfect ease humble all pride, and restrain the most daring and presumptuous attempts. The faithful here deride and despise whatever the wicked plot and conspire to execute, and bid them desist from their madness; and in calling upon them to do this, they intimate that they are making all this stir and commotion in vain, resembling madmen, who are drawn hither and thither by their own distempered imaginations. It is to be observed, that the Psalmist represents pride as the cause or mother of all rash and audacious enterprises. The reason why men rush with such recklessness upon unlawful projects most certainly is, that blinded by pride, they form an undue and exaggerated estimate of their own power. This being a malady which is not easily eradicated from the hearts of men, the admonition, Lift not up your horn on high (256) is repeated once and again. They are next enjoined not to speak with a fat or a stiff neck; by which is meant that they should not speak harshly and injuriously; (257) for it is usual with proud persons to erect the neck and raise the head when they pour forth their menaces. Others translate the words, Speak not stiffly with your neck; but the other translation is the more correct.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-75.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 75:4 I said unto the fools, Deal not foolishly: and to the wicked, Lift not up the horn:

Ver. 4. I said unto the fools, Deal not foolishly] Boast not yourselves so proudly and petulantly, but submit to God’s decree, and my government; how much more to Christ’s!

Lift not up the horn] Metaphora a tauris cornupetis.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-75.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 75:4. I said unto the fools, &c.— I gave notice to wild impious fools, behave not impiously. These, to the ninth verse, are the author's words, in consequence of God's declaration; in which he gives fair notice to impious persons to beware of insolence, and not to attribute success to random causes, or forces coming from this or that quarter, but to God; who, in the proper time, will do justice to all the world, out of that cup which he held in his hand; and they might depend upon it, that he would oblige the wicked to drink the very dregs of it. Mudge.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-75.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I said, with authority and command; I charged them.

The fools, i.e. the wicked, as that is explained in the next clause.

Deal not foolishly; desist from your impious and injurious practices, which shall not now go unpunished, as they have done.

Lift not up the horn; do not carry yourselves either arrogantly, boasting of your own strength, or scornfully and maliciously towards me or others of God’s people.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-75.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4. I said unto the fools—The king still speaks as God’s vicar. I said to the haughty, who by reason of their successes had grown insolent.

Deal not foolishly—Scornfully, boastfully.

Lift not up the horn—Toss not high your horn defiantly, as the infuriated bull, “from a sense of your strength, and with intention to strike.”Hengstenberg.

Speak not with a stiff neck—With an arrogant neck, a hard neck, a neck of impudence. The allusion is to the lofty tossing of the head of the bison, (when brought to bay,) displaying the pride and strength of his powerful neck.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-75.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

There. In that favoured country. The army of Sennacherib perished on its road to Pelusium, 4 Kings xx. --- Powers. Hebrew, "sparks," (Calmet) or "burning arrows." (Montanus) (Psalm xii. 14., and cxix. 4.) (Haydock) --- All the opponents of the Church, or Sion, must perish. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-75.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

fools = arrogant.

wicked. Hebrew. rasha".

horn. Put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Adjunct), for pride connected with the wearing of it.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-75.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Fools . . . foolishly.—Better, arrogant . . . arrogantly. See Psalms 73:3. (Comp. 1 Samuel 2:3.)


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-75.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I said unto the fools, Deal not foolishly: and to the wicked, Lift not up the horn:
I said
82:2-8; 94:8; Proverbs 1:22; 8:5; 9:6
Lift
89:17; 148:14; Daniel 7:20,21; Zechariah 1:21

Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 75:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-75.html.

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