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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 76:10

 

 

For the wrath of man shall praise You; With a remnant of wrath You will gird Yourself.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee - The rage of Sennacherib shall only serve to manifest thy glory. The stronger he is, and the more he threatens, and the weaker thy people, the more shall thy majesty and mercy appear in his destruction and their support.

The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain - The Hebrew gives rather a different sense: "Thou shalt gird thyself with the remainder of wrath." Even after thou hast sent this signal destruction upon Sennacherib and his army, thou wilt continue to pursue the remnant of the persecutors of thy people; their wrath shall be the cause of the excitement of thy justice to destroy them. As a man girds himself with his girdle, that he may the better perform his work, so thou wilt gird thyself with wrath, that thou mayest destroy thy enemies. A good maxim has been taken from this verse: "God often so counterworks the evil designs of men against his cause and followers, that it turns out to their advantage and his glory; nor does he permit them to go to the extent of what they have purposed, and of what they are able to perform. He suffers them to do some mischief, but not all they would or can do." But how different is the reading of the Vulgate! Quoniam cogitatio hominis confitebitur tibi: et reliquiae cogitationis diem festum agent tibi: "The thought of man shall praise thee; and the remains of thought shall celebrate a feast day to thee." The Septuagint and the Ethiopic have understood the text in the same way. Some translate thus: "Certainly, the ferocity of the man (Sennacherib) shall praise thee: and thou shalt gird thyself with the spoils of the furious." The spoils of this great army shall be a booty for thy people. Probably this is the true notion of the place. The old Psalter renders it thus: For thoght of man sal schrife (confess) to the, and levyngs (remains) of thoght a feste day till the sal wirk. The paraphrase is curious, of which this is the substance: "When man forsakes perfitly his synne, and sithen (afterwards) rightwisness werks; it is a feste day; whenne the conscience is clered, and makes feste with the swetnes of goddes lufe, restand fra besynes of any creatur in erth: Than is God at hame with his spouse dwelland."


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-76.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee - It shall be the occasion of praise; or, honor shall accrue to thee from it, “as if” it were employed in thy praise, and “as if” it were voluntarily engaged in promoting thy glory. The deliverance of the people by the direct interposition of God in the case referred to in the psalm, the sudden and entire overthrow of the invading forces by his power, led to this reflection. The overruling power of God was displayed. The “wrath” of the invading host had given occasion for this manifestation of the divine perfections; or, in other words, his character would not have been displayed in this manner if it had not been for these wicked purposes of people. It is not that there was anything in the wrath itself, or in their plans or intentions, that was in itself “adapted” to honor God; but that it was overruled by him, so that he took “occasion” from it to display his own character.

The wicked conduct of a child is an “occasion” for the display of the just character and the wise administration of a parent; the act of a pirate, a rebel, a murderer, furnishes an “occasion” for the display of the just principles of law, and the stability and power of a government. In like manner, the sins of the wicked are made an occasion for the display of the divine perfections in maintaining law; in the administering of justice; in preserving order. But there is another sense, also, in which the wrath of man is made the occasion for glorifying God. It is, that since there is such wrath, or since there are such wicked purposes, God makes use of that wrath, or of those wicked purposes, as he does of the powers of nature - of pestilence, disease, and storms, as instruments to accomplish his own designs, or to bring about great results. Thus he made use of the treasonable purpose of Judas, and the mad passions and the angry feelings of the Jews, in bringing about the work of redemption by the death of his Son; thus be made use of the purposes of Sennacherib in order to punish his own people (see the notes at Isaiah 10:5-7); thus he employed Cyrus to “execute his counsel” Isaiah 46:10; and thus he made use of the wrath evinced in persecuting the church to secure its permanent establishment in the world. Whether these things could be accomplished “without” that wrath, is a question which is too high for man to determine. It is certain, also, that the fact that God overrules the wrath of people does not justify that wrath. The purposes of people are, like the pestilence and the storm, what they are in themselves; and the nature of their conduct is not affected by any use that God may make of it. People must be judged according to their own deeds, not for what God does through their wickedness.

The remainder of wrath - The word “remainder” here - שׁארית she'êrı̂yth - means properly “part;” what remains, especially after a defeat or slaughter - the “survivors” of a battle, Jeremiah 11:23; Jeremiah 44:14; Micah 7:18; Zephaniah 2:7. Gesenius renders it here (Lexicon) “extreme wrath,” retained even in extremity. The Septuagint, ἐγκατάλειμμα engkataleimma - “the things which are left.” So the Vulgate, “reliquice.” Luther, “When men rage against thee, thou turnest it to honor; and when they rage yet more, thou art yet prepared.” Venema supposes that the meaning is the whole wrath. As in Arabic the word used here means “wholeness,” or the whole of anything; and according to this, the idea would be that it was not merely wrath in general, or in a general sense, that would be made use of, but all that there was in wrath; it would all be made use of in advancing the divine purposes. The allusion seems to be to something that had been laid up in a magazine - as provision or arms, when the soldier went forth to war - which he would make use of if necessary, so that “all” might be ultimately consumed or employed. The control of God was over “this” as well as over that which was actually employed; he could overrule that which was employed. He could restrain people from at all using this that was kept in reserve. The idea seems to be that all the “wrath” which is “manifested” among people would be made to praise God, or would be overruled for his glory - and “all” which would “not” contribute to this end he would keep back, he would check; he would prevent its being put forth - so that “all” should be under his control, and “all” disposed of as he should will. There was nothing in the heart or the purposes of man that was beyond his jurisdiction or control; man could do nothing in his wrathful plans that God could not dispose of in his own way, and for his own honor.

Shalt thou restrain - The word used here - חגר châgar - means literally to bind around; to gird; to gird up, as of a garment or sword that is girded on, 1 Samuel 17:39; 1 Samuel 25:13; Psalm 45:3; or sackcloth, Isaiah 15:3; Jeremiah 49:3. The Septuagint renders this, “and the remainder of wrath shall make a feast to thee,” ἐορτάσει σοί heortasei soi - that is, it shall praise or honor thee as in a festival. So the Vulgate. Prof. Alexander renders it, “Shalt thou gird about thee;” that is, God would gird it on as a sword, and would make use of it as a weapon for executing his own purposes. So DeWette, “And with the last wrath thou shalt gird thyself.” Others render it, “Thou restrainest the remainder of thy wrath” - that is, punishment - “when the wrath of man will not promote the knowledge of thyself” It seems to me, however, that our translators have expressed the exact idea in the psalm; and the meaning is, that the whole of the wrath of man is under the control of God, and that whatever there is, or would be, in the manifestation of that wrath, or in carrying out the purposes of the heart, which could not, in the circumstances, be made to promote his glory, or which would do injury, he would check and restrain. He would suffer it to proceed no further than he chose, and would make it certain that there should be no exhibition of wrathful feelings on the part of man which would not, in some way, be made to promote his honor, and to advance his own great purposes. He has absolute control over the passions of people, as he has over the pestilence, over earthquakes, and over storms, and can make all tributary to his glory, and executioners of his will.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-76.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee:

The residue of wrath shalt thou gird upon thee.

Vow, and pay unto Jehovah your God:

Let all that are round about him bring presents unto him that ought to be feared.

He will cut off the spirit of princes:

He is terrible to the kings of the earth."

Here again we have echoes of that judgment scene in Revelation 6:12-17, where the kings of the earth are seen crying for the rocks and the mountains to fall upon them and hide them from The Lamb and from Him that sitteth upon the throne.

"Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee" (Psalms 76:10). We have chosen this as an appropriate title of this whole psalm. Sennacherib was angry against God's people; but that vicious anger exhibited by his deployment of an arrogant and blasphemous army against Jerusalem surely `praised God' in its total destruction. It is always thus in history.

Pharaoh was angry with God's people and decided to exterminate all of them, by his edict commanding the destruction of all male children in the Nile River. Did that anger praise God? Indeed! Pharaoh's edict did not destroy God's people; it only bounced the infant Moses out of the River and into the lap of Pharaoh's daughter, from which position Moses eventually delivered God's people, destroying Pharaoh and all his host in the process. Thousands of other examples of the same phenomenon might be cited.

"The residue of wrath shalt thou gird upon thee" (Psalms 76:10). This makes much more sense if the marginal reading is used. "The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain."

"Vow, and pay unto Jehovah your God" (Psalms 76:11). The blessing of God upon his people and his protection of them against every enemy carries with it a reciprocal behavior pattern that is also binding upon Christians today. In order for the soul of redeemed persons to grow in the likeness of the Saviour, it is absolutely necessary that they should heed the admonition, "Freely ye have received; freely give." A stingy, penurious Christian is a contradiction of terms.

Kidner pointed out that not only are God's followers commanded to give (in the first part of this little paragraph); "But in the second half the surrounding world also are summonsed to pay tribute to the True God, who alone should be feared."[22]

The great lesson of this psalm, according to McCaw, is that the mighty victory over the most terrible army on earth in a single night, accomplished by a single word upon the lips of the Lord, "Should be seen as the pledge and foretaste of God's ultimate subjection of the entire world to do his will."[23]


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-76.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee,.... Either the wrath which comes from God, and has man for its object; and that either as it regards the people of God; so the Targum,

"when thou art angry with thy people, thou hast mercy on them, and they shall confess unto thy name;'

or praise thee; see Isaiah 12:1, they are deserving of the wrath of God, but are not appointed to it, and are delivered from it by Christ, who bore it for them as their representative; by which as the justice of God is glorified, it is matter of praise to them; when the law enters into their consciences, it works wrath there, which being removed by the application of pardoning grace, is an occasion of praise to God; and whereas, under afflictive dispensations, they apprehend and deprecate the wrath of God, when they are delivered from them their mouths are filled with songs of praise: or, as it regards wicked men, so it came forth upon the old world, and drowned it; upon Sodom and Gomorrah, and reduced them to ashes; upon Pharaoh and the Egyptians, in the plagues inflicted on them; all which turned to the praise and glory of God; of the last instance, see Romans 9:17, it came upon the wicked Jews to the uttermost in the destruction of their nation, city, and temple; and upon Rome Pagan, in the entire demolition of it as such; and so it will come upon Rome Papal, which will be attended with great joy, praise, and thanksgiving in the saints; see Revelation 11:17 or else this is to be understood of the wrath which is in man, and comes forth from him, and has him for its subject; which though it does not work the righteousness of God, yet the righteousness of God is glorified both in checking and punishing it; and the more it rages and burns against the people of God, the greater reason have they to praise the Lord when delivered from it; see Psalm 124:1, so the wrath of the Assyrian monarch, and of railing and blaspheming Rabshakeh, gave the people of the Jews a greater occasion to praise the Lord for their wonderful deliverance; so the wrath of men against Christ, his church and people, his ministers, Gospel, and ordinances, will all turn to the glory of his name, when in the issue it will be seen that these are established, overcoming all the rage and malice of men:

the remainder of wrath shall thou restrain: that which remains in a man's breast, he has not yet vented, God can and does keep in, that it may not break forth; this very likely was verified in Sennacherib, who might breathe revenge, and threaten the Jews with a second visit; but was prevented by a sudden and violent death. Some read the words, "the remainder of wraths thou wilt gird"F4שארית חמת תחגר "res duum irarum accinges", Pagninus, Montanus, Vatablus, Piscator, Gejerus. ; that is, those that remain, and are not destroyed through the rage and fury of men, God will gird with strength to defend themselves, and resist their enemies that may rise up against them, or with gladness, because of deliverance from them; see Psalm 18:32. Some understand this of the wrath of God, which he has in reserve and store for wicked men, and render the words thus, with the remainder of wrath wilt thou gird thyselfF5"Reliquo indignationum accinges te", so some in Vatablus; "residuo irarum accinges te", Michaelis. ; and so come forth like an armed man, clad with zeal, and arrayed with the garments of wrath and vengeance; see Isaiah 49:17.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-76.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Surely the g wrath of man shall praise thee: the remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain.

(g) For the end will show that the enemy was able to bring nothing to pass: also you will bridle their rage that they will not accomplish their purpose.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-76.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Man‘s wrath praises God by its futility before His power.

restrain — or, “gird”; that is, Thyself, as with a sword, with which to destroy, or as an ornament to Thy praise.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-76.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee: the remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain.

Surely — The furious attempts of thine enemies, shall cause thy people and others to praise thee for thy admirable wisdom, power, and faithfulness.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-76.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.Surely the wrath of men shall praise thee. Some understand these words as denoting, that after these enemies shall have submitted to God, they will yield to him the praise of the victory; being constrained to acknowledge that they have been subdued by his mighty hand. Others elicit a more refined sense, That when God stirs up the wicked, and impels their fury, he in this way affords a most illustrious display of his own glory; even as he is said to have stirred up the heart of Pharaoh for this very purpose, (Exodus 14:4; Romans 9:17.) Understood in this sense, the text no doubt contains a profitable doctrine, but this being, I am afraid, too refined an explanation, I prefer considering the meaning simply to be, that although at first the rage of the enemies of God and his Church may throw all things into confusion, and, as it were, envelop them in darkness, yet all will at length redound to his praise; for the issue will make it manifest, that, whatever they may contrive and attempt, they cannot in any degree prevail against him. The concluding part of the verse, The remainder of wrath thou wilt restrain, may also be interpreted in two ways. As the word חגר , chagar, signifies to gird, some supply the pronoun thee, and give this sense, All the enemies of the Church are not yet overthrown; but thou, O God! wilt gird thyself to destroy those of them who remain. The other interpretation is, however, the more simple., which is, that although these enemies might not cease to breathe forth their cruelty, yet God would effectually restrain them, and prevent them from succeeding in the accomplishment of their enterprises. (281) Perhaps, also, it would not be unsuitable to explain the verb thus, Thou wilt gather into a bundle, as we say in French, “Tu trousseras,” i.e., Thou wilt truss or pack up. Let us therefore learn, while the wicked would involve in obscurity and doubt the providence of God, to wait patiently until he glorify himself by bringing about a happier state of things, and trample under foot their infatuated presumption, to their shame and confusion. But if new troubles arise from time to time, let us remember that it is his proper office to restrain the remainder of the wrath of the wicked, that they may not proceed to greater lengths. Meanwhile, let us not be surprised if we observe fresh outrages every now and then springing forth; for, even to the end of the world, Satan will always have partisans or agents, whom he will urge forward to molest the children of God.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-76.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 76:10 Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee: the remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain.

Ver. 10. Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee] As when Sennacherib’s army was destroyed, the Israelites sang praise, yea, the Egyptians built altars, as Isaiah 19:19. God by his wisdom ordereth and draweth the blind and brute motions of the worst creatures unto his own honour; as the huntsman doth the rage of the dog to his pleasure; or the mariner the blowing of the wind to his voyage; or the artist, the heat of the fire to his work; or the physician, the bloodthirstiness of the leech to a cure, saith a reverend man.

The remainder of wrath shall thou restrain] Heb. shall thou gird; that is, curb and keep within compass. The Greek hath it, εορταζει σοι, it shall keep holy day to thee; that is, cease from working, or acting outwardly, how restless soever it be within.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-76.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Psalms 76:10

Through the long, sad history of the world, the glory of God has very much arisen from the display of His power in contest with human iniquity. He has an overruling wisdom and power, which can constrain the mighty evil that is in the world to render Him honour against its will, to act with an unconscious and undesigned subservience. The "wrath of man" very generally involves a corrupt principle: pride, arrogance, resentment, revenge. Can such a thing as this be made to praise the all-righteous Being? How transcendent then His power! Notice several of the ways in which He has manifested this power.

I. Sometimes He has suddenly quelled and crushed the wrath itself.

II. Sometimes the wrath and the persons actuated by it have been suddenly crushed by an avenging stroke of Divine justice.

III. The wrath of man has been made subservient to the "praise" of God by provoking signal manifestations of His power in very many ways, for example those in vindication of His insulted majesty. Not that His supreme majesty can be injured, or can need any avenging. But if He is to govern the earth, it is requisite that that be done which shall preserve an awful reverence in His subjects, that He shall not be defied with impunity by wrath pointed at Him. Therefore such transactions have taken place as those at Egypt and the Red Sea.

IV. Again, the "wrath of man" as against the cause and people of God has been overruled to His "praise." Persecution has driven the adherents of the good cause into a wide dispersion; and wherever they have gone, they have carried their sacred faith and become its apostles: they have carried much of their Christian virtues also. And then, again, by His avenging judgments on those who have endeavoured to destroy His people and cause, God has gained Himself glory.

V. It were a somewhat varied illustration of the text to observe that God has in some instances suffered the wrath of man to work on in a successful process, and without any apparent interference or opposition, till it was just coming to its natural result, and then by a sudden interposition has caused a result infinitely different.

VI. God makes use of this great evil, the "wrath of man," to make war on and destroy other great evils in the earth; He lets it go forth, with His commission, as a giant demolisher. One wicked nation has been made His avenger on the greater wickedness of another.

J. Foster, Lectures, 1st series, p. 282.



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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Sermon Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/psalms-76.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 76:10. Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee, &c.— This alludes to the insolent menaces of the Assyrians, and their disgraceful defeat. It seems probable from the two foregoing verses, that mighty thunderings preceded the destruction of the Assyrians; When God arose to judgment, i.e. sent forth his anger to destroy them.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-76.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

This is a most beautiful verse, and contains a most important doctrine indeed. We easily conceive how the Lord can make all his divine perfections to set forth his glory; but when he maketh the very wrath of man and the malice of his enemies to promote that end, and to produce the very reverse of what they intend; this more signally displays the divine hand. We have many illustrious examples in the word of God in proof. The cruelty manifested by the brethren of Joseph, in selling him for a slave, was made by the Lord to minister to his praise, in the preservation of all the house of Jacob; Genesis 45:7-8. So again the wrath of Haman against Mordecai laid the foundation for the Lord's praise in the ruin of Haman and the exaltation of Mordecai. Esther 3:5-6; Est_7:10. But above all, that glorious instance of the death of Christ, which the malice and wrath of the Jews accomplished, will prove the ground of everlasting praise, from the millions thereby redeemed, to all eternity! Acts 2:36. Hence we should learn, that the Lord will make use of so much of the malice of his and his people's enemies as shall subserve the purposes of his own glory and their welfare; and the remainder of that wrath, like the waves of the sea, he will keep back. So the Lord said to the proud invader, Isaiah 37:29. Reader, never lose sight of this.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-76.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The wrath of man shall praise thee; the blasphemous speeches and furious attempts of thine enemies shall serve thy glory, and cause thy people and others to praise and magnify thee for that admirable wisdom, and power, and faithfulness, and goodness which thou shalt discover upon that occasion.

The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain; thou shalt prevent and disappoint the succeeding malicious designs of thine enemies, who will meditate revenge for those shameful and terrible overthrows. Or,

the remainder of wrath thou shalt gird thyself with, i.e. put it on as an ornament, which the girdle was; thou shalt adorn thyself with it, as a conqueror doth with the spoils of his enemies.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-76.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. The wrath of man shall praise thee—As furnishing an occasion for the display of the divine character and attributes in delivering his people and punishing sin, and hence the increased praises of the triumphant righteous. So of Pharaoh, Exodus 9:16, and chaps, 14 and 15.

Remainder of wrath—A passage much tortured by interpreters. Is the wrath of man, or of God, here intended? This depends upon the signification of the word חגר, (hhagar,) rendered restrain in the common version. Its literal and usual sense is, to gird on, to bind. In this sense God is supposed to gird on the remainder of his wrath, not required for the present judgment, in order to new and further vengeance upon his enemies. But this certainly would not be חמת אדם, “the wrath of man,” which is the subject, and most literally defined. The word admits the sense of “restrain,” and the connexion requires it. Furst, though proposing another reading of the text, derives the sense “restrain” from the cognate Arabic and Syriac roots, and says, “The signification of to restrain proceeds from to bind,” and renders שׁארית חמת, the remnant of hostile wrath, which would give what we conceive to be the exact idea. So Phillips: “The word may denote girding in the sense of restraining.” Calvin: “More simple is the interpretation, that although the enemies cease not to breathe cruelty, yet shalt thou impede and restrain them, that they shall not be able to bring their attempts to pass.”


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-76.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 76:10. Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee — The furious attempts and blasphemous speeches of thine enemies shall serve thy glory, and cause thy people and others to praise and magnify thee for that admirable wisdom, power, faithfulness, and goodness which thou didst discover on that occasion. The remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain — Thou shalt prevent and disappoint the succeeding malicious designs of thine enemies, who will meditate revenge for those shameful and terrible overthrows. Or, as the Hebrew may be properly rendered, with the remainder of wrath shalt thou gird thyself; that is, thou shalt put it on as an ornament, which the girdle was; thou shalt adorn thyself with it as a conqueror adorns himself with the spoils of his enemies.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-76.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Mercies? Turning the waters another way, (Muis; Calmet) or going against his natural inclination. Vincit illum misericordia sua. (St. Jerome)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-76.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

man. Hebrew. "adam. App-14.


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-76.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-76.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Surely the wrath of man shall praise thee: the remainder of wrath shalt thou restrain.
Surely
Genesis 37:18-20,26-28; 50:20; Exodus 9:16,17; 15:9-11; 18:11; Daniel 3:19,20; Acts 4:26-28; Revelation 11:18
remainder
46:6; 65:7; 104:9; Matthew 2:13-16; 24:22; Acts 12:3-19

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 76:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-76.html.

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