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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 76:3

 

 

There He broke the flaming arrows, The shield and the sword and the weapons of war. Selah.

Adam Clarke Commentary

There brake he the arrows of the bow - רשפי rishphey, the fiery arrows. Arrows, round the heads of which inflammable matter was rolled, and then ignited, were used by the ancients, and shot into towns to set them on fire; and were discharged among the towers and wooden works of besiegers. The Romans called them phalaricae; and we find them mentioned by Virgil, Aen. lib. ix., ver. 705: -

Sed magnum stridens contorta phalarica venit,

Fulminis acta modo.

On this passage Servius describes the phalarica as a dart or spear with a spherical leaden head to which fire was attached. Thrown by a strong hand, it killed those whom it hit, and set fire to buildings, etc. It was called phalarica from the towers called phalae from which it was generally projected. In allusion to these St. Paul speaks of the fiery darts of the devil, Ephesians 6:16, to the note on which the reader is requested to refer.

The shield and the sword - If this refers to the destruction of Sennacherib's army, it may be truly said that God rendered useless all their warlike instruments, his angel having destroyed 185,000 of them in one night.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-76.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

There brake he the arrows of the bow - That is, in Salem, or near Salem. The language is such as would be used in reference to invaders, or to armies that came up to storm the city. The occasion is unknown; but the meaning is, that God drove the invading army back, and showed his power in defending the city. The phrase “the arrows of the bow,” is literally, “the lightnings of the bow,” the word rendered “arrows” meaning properly “flame;” and then, “lightning.” The idea is, that the arrows sped from the bow with the rapidity of lightning.

The shield - Used for defense in war. See Psalm 5:12; Psalm 33:20; compare the notes at Ephesians 6:16.

And the sword - That is, he disarmed his enemies, or made them as powerless as if their swords were broken.

And the battle - He broke the force of the battle; the strength of the armies drawn up for conflict.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-76.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

There brake he the arrows of the bow.... The Targum is,

"there brake he the arrows and the bows of the people that make war;'

the word רשפי, translated "arrows", signifies "sparks or coals of fire"; see Job 5:7 and is used of arrows, because they fly swiftly, as sparks do, or because of their brightness, or because fiery; so we read of "the fiery darts of Satan", Ephesians 6:16, and perhaps they may be meant here: when Christ our Lord suffered near Jerusalem, he spoiled principalities and powers, and broke their strength and might, and made peace by the blood of his cross, in which he triumphed over them; for the destroying of these instruments of war with what follow:

the shield, and the sword, and the battle, is expressive of making wars to cease, and causing peace; and may include the peace which was all the world over at the birth of Christ, and was foretold and expressed in much such language as here, Zechariah 9:9, and also that which was made by his sufferings and death, and which was published in his Gospel by his apostles, whom he sent forth unarmed, whose weapons were not carnal, but spiritual; and likewise the spiritual peace he gives to his people, quenching the fiery darts of Satan, and delivering them from the archers that shoot at them, and sorely grieve them; as well as that peace which shall be in the world and churches in the latter day; see Psalm 46:11,

Selah. See Gill on Psalm 3:2.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-76.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

the arrows — literally, “thunderbolts” (Psalm 78:48), from their rapid flight or ignition (compare Psalm 18:14; Ephesians 6:16).

the battle — for arms (Hosea 2:18).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-76.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

There brake he the arrows of the bow, the shield, and the sword, and the battle. /*Selah*/.

There — At Jerusalem.

Sword — Both offensive and defensive weapons.

Battle — All the power of the army, which was put in battle-array.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-76.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

3.There he broke the arrows of the bow. We have here stated the particular way in which God was known in Judah. He was known by the wonderful proofs of his power, which he exhibited in preserving the city. Under these figures is described the destruction of the enemies of the chosen people. (268) They could not otherwise have been overthrown than by being despoiled of their armor and weapons of war. It is therefore said, that the arrows, the swords, and the shields, were broken, yea, all the implements of war; implying that these impious enemies of the Church were deprived of the power of doing harm. The fact indeed is, that they were wounded and slain, while their weapons remained uninjured; but this metonymy, by which what befell themselves is represented as happening to their implements of war, is not improper. Some translate the word רשפים, reshaphim, points of weapons! Properly, it should be renderedfires; (269) but it is more accurate to take it for arrows. Even birds are sometimes metaphorically so called, on account of their swiftness; and flying is attributed to arrows in Psalms 91:6


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-76.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 76:3 There brake he the arrows of the bow, the shield, and the sword, and the battle. Selah.

Ver. 3. There brake he the arrows of the bolt,] There? Where? Surely in Zion, in the holy assemblies where the saints were praying, there the arrow, shield, spear, &c., were broken. This made the queen-mother of Scotland say, that she more feared the prayers of John Knox than an army of thirty thousand fighting soldiers. The king of Sweden, as soon as he set foot in Germany, fell down to prayer, and what great things did he in a little time! Now for the fruit of prayer, cried those great gallants at Edgehill fight, and did great exploits. The word here rended arrows signifieth fiery darts, see Ephesians 6:16; a burning coal, Job 5:7; a lightening bolt, Psalms 78:48; the plague, or carbuncle, Deuteronomy 32:24, Habakkuk 3:5. Strabo saith that Orites, Gynmetes, and Ethiopians shot fiery arrows: so might the Assyrians. Confer Psalms 120:4.

The shield, and the sword, and the battle] Both the men and the munition. This Herodotus had heard of, but misrelates the history, lib. 2.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-76.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 76:3. There brake he the arrows, &c.— The fiery arrows of the bow, &c. That is, there, before the walls of Jerusalem, he overthrew the enemy, and destroyed all their military preparations. See 2 Kings 19:32.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-76.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

The best comment on this verse is the apostle's general observation, If God be for us, who can be against us? Jesus is both a Sun and a Shield; and no weapon formed against his people can prosper. Romans 8:31.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-76.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

There, i.e. in Judah, or at or near Jerusalem.

The arrows, Heb. the sparks; the sparkling arrows, bright and shining, swift and piercing, like sparks of fire. The bow, the shield, and the sword; both offensive and defensive weapons, so as they could neither hurt God’s people, nor save themselves from ruin.

The battle; the force and fury of the battle, and all the power of the army, which was put in battle-array.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-76.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3. There brake he the arrows—The adverbial particle, שׁם, (sham,) “there,” is not to be understood of the place where the miracle of destruction was wrought, but of that whence the miraculous power emanated, namely Zion, or Salem, and should be translated thence, from thence. Thus, “His dwelling-place in Zion. Thence brake he,” etc. So the word is used, Genesis 11:8, “The Lord scattered them abroad from thence;” and Genesis 26:17, “Isaac departed thence.” It is from his dwelling-place God hears and answers prayer. It is a lofty conception of Zion as the throne of Deity.

Arrows of the bow—Hebrew, Flames, or lightnings of the bow, that is, flaming or flashing arrows, a description not uncommon of furbished weapons. Job 39:23; Nahum 3:3. Comp. Ephesians 6:16.

And the battle—Either poetically for the weapons of war, or directly the war itself. This latter is the true idea. He shivered the battle; that is, ended the war by one stroke, in destroying the warriors. See Hosea 2:18, (Hebrews 76:20,) and the parallel passage, Psalms 46:9


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-76.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 76:3. There brake he, &c. — That is, in Judah, or at or near Jerusalem; the arrows of the bow — Hebrew, רשׁפי קשׁת, rishpee kasheth, the sparks of the bow, the sparkling arrows, bright and shining, swift and piercing, like sparks of fire. Some render it, the fiery arrows of the bow, the shield and the sword — Both offensive and defensive weapons, so that they could neither hurt God’s people nor save themselves from ruin; and the battle — The force and fury of the battle, and all the power of the army put in battle array.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-76.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Deceived, in my expectations, as I prayed with mind and body continually. (Worthington) --- Good works are a strong recommendation. "They cry, though we be silent." Many have recourse to the great for assistance, and few to God. Yet in isto invenio omnia. (St. Jerome) --- Hebrew is variously translated, and may have been altered. "My hand fell in the night, and ceased not." Symmachus and St. Jerome come near to the Vulgate. (Calmet) --- They have, "and does not cease," which would be the case, if the person were deceived or rejected. (Berthier) --- Protestants, "my sore ran," &c. (Haydock) --- But this seems rather violent. (Calmet) --- Comforted. By any worldly advantages. (Menochius) --- Joy can come from God alone. (Berthier)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-76.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

There. Emphatic. Hebrew. sham. Compare Genesis 2:8. Exodus 40:3 (therein). Deuteronomy 1:39 (thither). 2 Chronicles 6:11 (in it).

brake He = hath He broken in pieces.

battle. Put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Adjunct), for other weapons used in battle.

Selah. Connecting the Jebusite defeat with God Who gave it; and passing on from the third person to the second. See App-66. Note the emphasis on "Thou".


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-76.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

There brake he the arrows of the bow, the shield, and the sword, and the battle. Selah.

There. Hengstenberg translates, 'Hence,' from this place, so that they are broken in falling from it.

Brake he the arrows of the bow - literally, 'the flames' or 'the lightnings of the bow,' poetically for the glittering swift arrows, (Deuteronomy 32:41, and Nahum 3:3, relating to the Assyrians, as here; cf. Psalms 78:48, margin)

The shield, and the sword, and the battle. "The battle," placed last, indicates that not merely was the enemy defeated, but at one stroke the whole war was put an end to. The parallel, Psalms 46:9, illustrates this. Not as some translate, 'the accoutrements of battle.'


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-76.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) There.—This word in Psalms 14:5 does not appear to have a strictly definite local sense; and here may refer to time, possibly to some event, which we are not able with certainty to recover.

Arrows.—Literally, flashes. (See Note, Song of Solomon 8:6.) The image may be derived from the lightning speed of the flight of arrows, or from the custom of shooting bolts tipped with flame (see Note, Psalms 7:13), or the connection may be from the metaphor in Psalms 91:5-6, since the Hebrew word here used denotes pestilence in Habakkuk 3:5.

The shield, the sword, and the battle—Hosea 2:18 is the original of this. (Comp. Psalms 46:9.) Notice the fine poetic touch in the climactic use of battle to sum up all the weapons of war.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-76.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

There brake he the arrows of the bow, the shield, and the sword, and the battle. Selah.
There
46:9; 2 Chronicles 14:12,13; 20:25; 32:21; Isaiah 37:35,36; Ezekiel 39:3,4,9,10

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 76:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-76.html.

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