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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 76:4

 

 

You are resplendent, More majestic than the mountains of prey.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Than the mountains of prey - This is an address to Mount Zion. Thou art more illustrious and excellent than all the mountains of prey, i.e., where wild beasts wander, and prey on those that are more helpless than themselves. Zion was the place where God dwelt; the other mountains were the abode of wild beasts.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-76.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Thou art more glorious and excellent - The word rendered glorious - נאור na'ôr - is from the verb which means “to shine,” to give light, and the word would properly refer to a luminous or “shining” object - as the sun, the source of light. Hence, it means “shining,” splendid, glorious; and it is thus applied to the Divine Being with reference to his perfections, being like light. Compare 1 John 1:5. The word rendered “excellent,” means exalted, noble, great. These words are applied here to God from the manifestation of his perfections in the case referred to.

Than the mountains of prey - The word “prey” as employed here - טרף ṭereph - means that which is obtained by hunting; and then, plunder. It is usually applied to the food of wild beasts, beasts of prey. Here it refers to the “mountains” considered as the abode or stronghold of robbers and banditti, from where they sally forth in search of plunder. These mountains, in their heights, their rocks, their fastnesses, furnished safe places of retreat for robbers, and hence, they became emblems of power. It is not improbable that the hordes referred to in the psalm had their abodes in such mountains, and hence, the psalmist says that God who made those mountains and hills was superior to them in strength and power.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-76.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Glorious art thou, and excellent, more than mountains of prey.

The stouthearted are made a spoil, They have slept their sleep;

And none of the men of might have found their hands.

At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob,

Both chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep."

"More than mountains of prey" (Psalms 76:4). There is some uncertainty of the meaning here. Delitzsch explained it as, "An appellation for haughty possessors of worldly power."[11]

"They have slept their sleep ... and none ... have found their hands" (Psalms 76:5). Briggs translated this verse this way:

"The stouthearted slept their last sleep,

And the men of war did not find spoil."[12]SIZE>

The clause, "none have found their hands" in the New English Bible is rendered, "the men cannot lift a hand." The Septuagint (LXX) reads, "have found nothing in their hands." Rawlinson gave the meaning as, "They cannot even move a hand."[13] Such various attempts to give the meaning of an admittedly difficult verse should not concern us very much, because, what is being described here, according to Delitzsch, is, "A field of corpses, the effect of the omnipotent energy of the word of the God of Jacob."[14]

"Both chariot and horse ... into a dead sleep" (Psalms 76:6). Of course, no chariot ever went to sleep. The chariot here, by a figure of speech, refers to charioteer, just as the horse also includes the rider. Sudden death overcame the whole army.

"Cast into a deep sleep" (Psalms 76:6). "The sleep here is the sleep of death as distinguished from natural sleep."[15]

"One word from the sovereign lips of the God of Jacob, and all the noise of the camp is hushed, and we look upon a field of the dead, lying in awful stillness, dreamlessly sleeping their long slumber."[16]

A GLIMPSE OF THE ETERNAL JUDGMENT DAY

We have previously quoted from Lord Byron's poem, but here are a few more lines of it:

"And there lay the steed with his nostril all wide.

But through it there rolled not the breath of his pride;

And the foam of his gasping lay white on the turf,

And cold as the spray of the rock-beating surf.

And there lay the rider distorted and pale,

With the dew on his brow and the rust on his mail.

And the tents were all silent, the banners alone,

The lances unlifted, the trumpet unblown."SIZE>


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-76.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Thou art more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey. Which is to be understood not of Zion, as some interpret it; though it is true that the mountain of Zion, or the church of Christ, his kingdom and interest, shall in the latter day be more glorious and excellent than all other mountains, kingdoms, and interests; see Isaiah 2:2, but of God or Christ before spoken of; and so the Targum,

"bright, to be feared, art thou, O God, to be praised from the house of thy sanctuary.'

Christ, who is God over all, is "bright"F26נאור "illustris", Pagninus, Montanus, Musculus, Junius & Tremellius, Piscator; "illustrior", Tigurine, version; "splendidus", Vatablus, Gejerus, Michaelis; "bright", Ainsworth. , splendid, and glorious, in his divine nature, being the brightness of his Father's glory, and the express image of his person: and "excellent" in his office as Mediator, and in all his works as such; and in human nature, at he is exalted at his Father's right hand, far above all principality, power, might, and dominion, signified here by "mountains of prey": the kingdoms of this world, because of their eminence and strength, are compared to mountains: see Isaiah 41:15 and may be called "mountains of prey", in allusion to mountains inhabited by beasts of prey, as lions and leopards; see Song of Solomon 4:8 because obtained and possessed by tyranny and oppression. Christ is more glorious and excellent than the kings of the earth; he is higher than they, and is King of kings; he is richer than they, the earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof, the world, and they that dwell therein; he is wiser than they, by him kings reign, and princes decree justice; he is more powerful than they, and all must submit to him, and all will serve him hereafter; and his kingdom will be greater than theirs, more large and more lasting; it will be an everlasting one, and reach from sea to sea, and even to the ends of the earth.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-76.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Thou [art] more glorious [and] excellent than c the mountains of prey.

(c) He compares the kingdom full of extortion and rapine to the mountains that are full of ravening beasts.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-76.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Thou — God.

mountains of prey — great victorious nations, as Assyria (Isaiah 41:15; Ezekiel 38:11, Ezekiel 38:12; Zechariah 4:7).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-76.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Thou art more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey.

Thou — O God.

Than — The greatest kings and empires of the earth, which in prophetic writings are often compared to mountains. And they are called mountains of prey, because they generally were established by tyranny, and maintained by preying upon their own subjects, or other kingdoms.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-76.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

It is farther added, (verse 4th,) that God is more glorious and terrible than the mountains of prey By the mountains of prey, is meant kingdoms distinguished for their violence and extortion. We know that from the beginning, he who exercised himself most in robbery and pillage, was the man who most enlarged his borders and became greatest. The Psalmist, therefore, here compares those great kings, who had acquired large dominions by violence and the shedding of human blood, to savage beasts, who live only upon prey, and their kingdoms to mountains covered with forests, which are inhabited by beasts inured to live by the destruction of other animals. The enemies of God’s ancient people had been accustomed to make violent and furious assaults upon Jerusalem; but it is affirmed that God greatly surpassed them all in power that the faithful might not be overwhelmed with terror.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-76.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 76:4 Thou [art] more glorious [and] excellent than the mountains of prey.

Ver. 4. Thou art more glorious and excellent] Or, more bright and magnificent. Glorious God was before, but now more glorious by this late deliverance, illuminating his people with his marvellous light.

Than the mountains of prey] Those vast hosts of Assyrians lying now upon the mountains around Jerusalem, and plundering the country at their pleasure. Thou, Lord, art far more illustrious and admirable than all those Grassatores populi, ac reges quantumvis elati, those mountains of lions and leopards, Song of Solomon 4:8, the kingdoms of this world, enemies to the Church.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-76.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 76:4. Thou art more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey The meaning of this verse is, that Jehovah, who sendeth help to his people from Mount Sion, is superior to the gods of the mountains, under whose protection the despoilers of the earth make their depredations. From the powerful assistance which Jehovah afforded his people from Mount Sion, the Assyrians called him, the God of the hills, and not of the vallies: see 1 Kings 20:23. Green. Houbigant renders it, thou art more radiant than light; thou art higher than the eternal mountains; and Mudge, Thou shonest forth glorious from the mountains of prey. It seems very doubtful what these mountains of prey were. See Psalms 29:9. The common sense given to the passage is, "Thou, O Sion, art far more impregnable, through the defence of God, than the mountains upon which the Assyrians had fortified themselves, and from which their soldiers made frequent excursions to ravage the country." Slept their sleep, in the next verse, means, so as never to awake again: (see 2 Kings 20:21.) and found their hands, or arms, signifies, are enabled to strike a stroke.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-76.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

If this be an address to the church, it is a lovely and a just one: Zion is glorious and excellent in her Redeemer's view; Song of Solomon 1:15. But the cause of all this loveliness is from himself. Ezekiel 16:14.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-76.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Thou, O God; to whom he directeth his speech here, as also Psalms 76:6-8.

Than the mountains of prey; either,

1. Than the greatest kings and emperors of the earth, which in prophetical writings are oft compared to mountains, as Psalms 46:2,3 Isa 41:15 Jeremiah 51:25 Habakkuk 3:6. And they are called mountains of prey, because then they generally were established by tyranny, and maintained by preying upon their own subjects, or other inferior kingdoms. Or,

2. (which amounts to the same thing) Than the most powerful enemies of thy people, upon whom they used and now desired and expected to prey; such persons being oft expressed by the name of mountains, as Psalms 144:5 Zechariah 4:7, &c.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-76.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4. Mountains of prey—The verse is elliptical and obscure, but literally the words would seem to mean, mountains where beasts of prey abounded and held high carnival. Song of Solomon 4:8. Others suppose the reference is to mountains whose rocky dens offered a retreat for robbers where they could bestow their plunder, and from which they issued forth. In either case the metaphor is easily deduced. The language is applicable to the haughty invaders who had spread terror throughout the nation, making it a war of plunder as well as of conquest, and who, probably, had stored their spoils in fortified high places, here called “mountains of prey”equal to plunder mountains. Stanley supposes reference is made to the “armory” of the “house of the forest of Lebanon” on Zion, where were displayed the shields of mighty men. See Song of Solomon 4:4; Isaiah 22:8. Hammond takes the idea to be, that God is more glorious in power and majesty than the strong mountain fortifications where the enemy made his rendezvous. Either sense might be accepted, though the first seems most natural.

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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-76.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 76:4. Thou — O God, to whom he is thought to direct his speech here, as also Psalms 76:6, art more glorious, &c., than the mountains of prey — Than the greatest kings and empires of the earth, which in the prophetical writings are often compared to mountains. And they are called mountains of prey, because then they were generally established by tyranny, and maintained by preying on their own subjects, or other inferior kingdoms: or, which amounts to the same thing, than the most powerful enemies of thy people, upon whom they used, and now expected, to prey. Or, as some think, the psalmist asserts here that Jehovah, who sent help to his people from mount Zion, was superior to the idol gods of the mountains, under whose protection the despoilers of the earth made their depredations. Thus the powerful assistance which Jehovah afforded his people from mount Zion, caused the Syrians to call him the God of the hills, and not of the valleys, 1 Kings 20:23. But the words may be considered as an apostrophe to mount Zion, and then the sense is, Thou, O Zion, art infinitely more glorious and excellent, and far more impregnable, through the favour and protection of God, than the mountains upon which the Assyrians had fortified themselves, and from which their soldiers made frequent excursions, and ravaged the country; more safe and secure, through the defence of the Almighty, than “the arm of flesh and the instruments of war could render the kingdoms of the earth, which set themselves against Zion; and which, for their tyranny, and cruelty, and the ravages committed by them, are likened to those mountains, where beasts of prey, with similar dispositions, rove, and roar, and devour.” — Horne.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-76.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Delighted. Hebrew, "cried out," which many explain through sorrow. But the Septuagint seem rather to take it in a different sense, as well as the swooning, which might proceed from ecstatic joy (Berthier) at the thought of God. The alternate sorrows and joys of the just are well described. They are seldom allowed to continue long in the same state. Protestants, "I complained, and my spirit was overwhelmed. Selah." St. Jerome, "I spoke within myself," exercising myself in meditation. (Haydock) --- I was sometimes in such distress, that nothing seemed capable of giving me any comfort. But I relied on God, and was in an ecstacy. (Worthington)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-76.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

mountains of prey. The great mountain (Zion) which had become a prey: i.e. a prey seized, as in next verse; the mighty men bad become a spoil, or been plundered.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-76.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Thou art . . .—Better, Splendid art thou, glorious one, from the mountains of prey. The construction is somewhat doubtful and favours Hupfeld’s emendation (nora, i.e., to be feared, as in verses 8 and 13, instead of noar, i.e., glorious). Certainly the comparative of the Authorised Version is to be abandoned. The poet’s thought plainly proceeds from the figure of Psalms 76:2. The mountains are the mountains of prey of the Lion of Judah. True, a different image, as so frequently in Hebrew poetry, suddenly interrupts and changes the picture. The hero appears from the battle shining in the spoils taken from the foe.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-76.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Thou art more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey.
mountains
Jeremiah 4:7; Ezekiel 19:1-4,6; 38:12,13; Daniel 7:4-8,17-28

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 76:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-76.html.

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