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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 76:5

 

 

The stouthearted were plundered, They sank into sleep; And none of the warriors could use his hands.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The stout-hearted are spoiled - The boasting blasphemers, such as Rab-shakeh, and his master Sennacherib, the king of Assyria.

They have slept their sleep - They were asleep in their tent when the destroying angel, the suffocating wind, destroyed the whole; they over whom it passed never more awoke.

None of the men of might - Is not this a strong irony? Where are your mighty men? their boasted armor, etc.?


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-76.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The stout-hearted are spoiled - The valiant men, the men who came so confidently to the invasion. The word “spoiled” here, as elsewhere in the Scriptures, means “plundered,” not (as the word is now used) “corrupted.” See the notes at Colossians 2:8.

They have slept their sleep - They are dead; they have slept their last sleep. Death, in the Scriptures, as in all other writings, is often compared with sleep.

And none of the men of might - The men who came forth for purposes of war and conquest.

Have found their hands - The Septuagint renders this, “Have found nothing in their hands;” that is, they have obtained no plunder. Luther renders it, “And all warriors must suffer their hands to fall.” De Wette, “Have lost their hands?” The idea seems to be, that they had lost the use of their hands; that is, that they had no use for them, or did not find them of any use. They could not employ them for the purpose for which they were intended, but were suddenly stricken down.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-76.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The stout hearted are spoiled,.... The Assyrian army, its officers and generals, that came up against Jerusalem, with great resolution and courage, and with daring impiety and blasphemy against the God of heaven, as Rabshakeh and others; these were spoiled, and their armour and riches became a prey to those they thought to have made a prey of. So principalities and powers were spoiled by Christ upon the cross, and Satan, the strong man armed, has in the conversion of a sinner his armour taken from him, and his spoils divided by him that is stronger than he; and such as are stouthearted, and far from true righteousness, are stripped of their own, and made willing, in the day of Christ's power upon them, to submit to his; and as for antichrist, whose look is more stout than his fellows, that exalts himself above all that is called God, and opens his mouth in blasphemy against him and his followers, he shall be destroyed with the breath of Christ's mouth, and the brightness of his coming: or "the stout hearted have spoiled themselves"F1אשתוללו "praedae se exposnerunt", Tigurine version, Gejerus; "dediderunt se in praedam", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator. ; as the Midianites did, or gave themselves for a prey; so the Targum,

"the stouthearted have cast off from them the weapons of war;'

threw away their armour, and ran away, such of them as were not destroyed by the angel. It is observable, that the Hebrew word, translated "spoiled", is in the Syriac form:

they have slept their sleep: the sleep of death, as did the Assyrians when smitten by the angel, which was done in the night, when probably they were fast asleep, and so never awoke more, as the Babylonians, Jeremiah 51:57. So Jezebel, or the Romish antichrist, shall be cast into a bed, and her children killed with death, Revelation 2:22. Death is often in Scripture signified by a sleep, both the death of the righteous and of the wicked; but there is a difference between the one and the other; wherefore the death of the wicked here is called "their sleep"; the one sleep in Jesus, in his arms, and under his guardianship, the other not; to the one death is a true and proper rest from toil and labour, to the other only a cessation from doing mischief, Job 3:17, the one rests in hopes of a glorious resurrection, the other not; the one will awake in Christ's likeness, and to everlasting life; the other in the image of Satan, and to everlasting shame and contempt:

and none of the men of might have found their hands; none of the valiant soldiers in the Assyrian army could find their hands to fight their enemies, or defend themselves; as men in a deep sleep cannot find their hands to do anything, and are as if they had none, and still less in a dead sleep. The Targum is,

"they were not able to lay hold on their armour with their hands.'

This was the case of them that were killed; and as for those that remained alive, they were struck with such a panic, that their hearts could not endure, nor their hands be strong when God thus dealt with them; and so it will be with the antichristian army at the battle of Armageddon; and so it is with the wicked at death, they cannot find their hands so as to prevent it; and when it has seized upon them, they cannot find their hands to do any more mischief.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-76.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The stouthearted are spoiled, they have slept their sleep: and none of the men of might have d found their hands.

(d) God has taken their spirits and strength from them as though their hands were cut off.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-76.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

slept their sleep — died (Psalm 13:3).

none … found … hands — are powerless.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-76.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The stouthearted are spoiled, they have slept their sleep: and none of the men of might have found their hands.

Sleep — Even a perpetual sleep.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-76.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

5.The stout-hearted were spoiled, The power of God in destroying his enemies is here exalted by another form of expression. The verb אשתוללו , eshtolelu, which we translate were spoiled, is derived from שלל, shalal, and the letter א, aleph, is put instead of the letter ה, he. (270) Some translate, were made fools; (271) but this is too forced. I, however, admit that it is of the same import, as if it had been said, that they were deprived of wisdom and courage; but we must adhere to the proper signification of the word. What is added in the second clause is to the same purpose, All the men of might have not found their hands (272) that is to say, they were as incapable of fighting as if their hands had been maimed or cut off. In short, their strength, of which they boasted, was utterly overthrown. The words,they slept their sleep, (273) refer to the same subject; implying that whereas before they were active and resolute, their hearts now failed them, and they were sunk asleep in sloth and listlessness. The meaning, therefore, is, that the enemies of the chosen people were deprived of that heroic courage of which they boasted, and which inspired them with such audacity; and that, in consequence, neither mind, nor heart, nor hands, none either of their mental or bodily faculties, could perform their office. We are thus taught that all the gifts and power which men seem to possess are in the hand of God, so that he can, at any instant of time, deprive them of the wisdom which he has given them, make their hearts effeminate, render their hands unfit for war, and annihilate their whole strength. It is not without reason that both the courage and power of these enemies are magnified; the design of this being, that the faithful might be led, from the contrast, to extol the power and working of God. The same subject is farther confirmed from the statement, that the chariot and the horse were cast into a deep sleep at the rebuke of God (274) This implies, that whatever activity characterised these enemies, it was rendered powerless, simply by the nod of God. Although, therefore, we may be deprived of all created means of help, let us rest contented with the favor of God alone, accounting it all-sufficient, since he has no need of great armies to repel the assaults of the whole world, but is able, by the mere breath of his mouth, to subdue and dissipate all assailants.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-76.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 76:5 The stouthearted are spoiled, they have slept their sleep: and none of the men of might have found their hands.

Ver. 5. The stout-hearted are spoiled] Heb. have yielded themselves up for prey: those that escaped the stroke of the angel, fled as fast as they could for their lives, leaving all behind them. The Rabbis expound it, they are spoiled of their understanding, infatuated.

They have slept their sleep] Their long ironsleep (as the poets call it) of death. The destroying angel hath laid them fast enough and safe enough.

And none of the men of might] Viri divitiarum, the Vulgate rendereth it, men of riches, such as are all worldlings, but men of might is better; these men of their hands could not find their hands, when God’s angel took them to do.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-76.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Are spoiled of all that glory and advantage which they either had already gotten, or further expected, from the success of their present expedition, which they promised to themselves. They became a prey to those upon whom they hoped to prey.

Their sleep; even a perpetual sleep, as Jeremiah 51:39,57, or the sleep of death, Psalms 13:3; called their sleep emphatically, as being peculiar to them and such-like men, and not that sleep which is common to the good and bad. Their death he seems to call sleep, because they were slain in the night, when they had composed themselves to rest and sleep, and so passed insensibly from one sleep to another. For it is thought by many that this Psalm was composed upon the occasion of that prodigious slaughter of the Assyrians in Judah, 2 Kings 19:35. None have found their hands; they had no more strength in or use of their hands against the destroying angel, than they who have no hands.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-76.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5. Stout-hearted are spoiled—Instead of making plunder of God’s people they themselves are become a spoil.

Slept their sleep—Their perpetual sleep, the sleep of death. Jeremiah 51:39-57.

None… have found their hands—They found not “their hands” in the sense of discovering, bringing back to light, a lost object, though the least degree of self-consciousness would have sufficed for this; nor yet in the sense to have power over, as the word may signify. 1 Samuel 23:17; Psalms 21:9. These mighty men, whose name had been the terror of the nations, now had neither consciousness to discover, nor ability to use, their hands. The words are in contrast with their boasted strength and skill.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-76.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

My eyes. Vatican Septuagint, Arabic, and St. Augustine read, "my enemies," but our Vulgate follows the edition of Aldus and Complutensian (Berthier) very frequently, which here agree better with the Hebrew, "I hindered my eyes from looking up;" (St. Jerome; Symmachus) or, "thou hast kept the watches of my eyes," (Aquila) hindering me from sleeping; (Haydock) so that I did not watch three hours only, like the sentinels, but all night. (Calmet) --- The sudden address to God seems incorrect. (Berthier) --- I rose before the usual time, yet did not utter my sentiments, (Worthington) being quite oppressed both with grief and joy. (Haydock) --- I durst not speak, as I was convinced that thy judgments were right. (Menochius)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-76.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

none . . . found their hands. Idiom for helplessness. Like losing heart or finding heart (2 Samuel 7:27).

men. Hebrew. "enosh. App-14.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-76.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Are spoiled.—Literally, have let themselves be spoiled. The picture is of men rendered powerless, at a glance, a word, from God.

Slept their sleep.—Better, have sunk into a deep sleep.

None of the men of might have found their hands.—This expression for powerlessness naturally grew into an idiom in a language that used the word hand as a synonym for strength. (Comp. Joshua 8:20, margin; Exodus 14:31, margin; Deuteronomy 32:36, margin.) Delitzsch quotes a Talmudic phrase, “We did not find our hands and feet in the school house.” We may compare the Virgilian use of manus (Æn. 6:688), and Shakespeare’s “a proper fellow of my hands,” and for the use of “find” compare the common phrase “find one’s tongue.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-76.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The stouthearted are spoiled, they have slept their sleep: and none of the men of might have found their hands.
stout-hearted
Job 40:10-12; Isaiah 46:12; Daniel 4:37; Luke 1:51,52
they
13:3; Isaiah 37:36; Jeremiah 51:39; Nahum 3:18
and
Isaiah 31:8; Ezekiel 30:21-25

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 76:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-76.html.

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