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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 76:6

 

 

At Your rebuke, O God of Jacob, Both rider and horse were cast into a dead sleep.

Adam Clarke Commentary

At thy rebuke - It was not by any human means that this immense army was overthrown; it was by the power of God alone. Not only infantry was destroyed, but the cavalry also.

The chariot and horse - That is, the chariot horses, as well as the men, were

Cast into a dead sleep - Were all suffocated in the same night. On the destruction of this mighty host, the reader is requested to refer to the notes on 2 Kings 19.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-76.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob - At thy word; thy bidding; or, when God rebuked them for their attempt to attack the city. The idea is, that they were discomfited by a word spoken by God.

Both the chariot and horse … - The Septuagint renders this, “They who are mounted on horses.” The word rendered “chariot” here - רכב rekeb - may mean “riders, cavalry,” as well as chariot. See the notes at Isaiah 21:7. Hence, there would be less incongruity in the Hebrew than in our translation, where it is said that the “chariots” have fallen into a deep sleep. The idea may be either that horsemen and horses had fallen into a deep slumber, or that the rumbling of the chariot-wheels had ceased, and that there was a profound silence, like a deep sleep.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-76.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob,.... The God of Jacob personally, and of his posterity, the children of Israel, and of the church, often so called who rebukes his people in love, but his enemies with furious rebukes, with rebukes in flames of fire; with such he rebukes the Heathen, destroys the wicked, and puts out their name for ever:

both the chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep; that is, the riders in chariots and on horses; such there were doubtless in the Assyrian army, it being usual to have such in great armies. Kimchi observes, that the word נרדם, translated "cast into a dead sleep", is in the singular number, and interprets it of the king, the head of the men of might: but Sennacherib, king of Assyria, was not slain, he departed to his own country; wherefore he applies it to Gog and Magog, the chief prince of Meshech and Tubal, Ezekiel 39:1 and may very well be understood of the head of the apostasy, the king of the bottomless pit, the beast or false prophet, who being destroyed, the flesh of his captains and horsemen shall be the food of the fowls of the air, at the supper of the great God, Revelation 19:17.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-76.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

chariot and horse — for those fighting on them (compare Psalm 68:17).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-76.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob, both the chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep.

Chariot — The men who rode upon, and fought from chariots and horses.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-76.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 76:6 At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob, both the chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep.

Ver. 6. At thy rebuke, O God, &c.] i.e. With thy mighty word of command, and without any more ado. God can nod men to destruction, Psalms 80:16, blow them into hell, Job 4:9, rebuke them to death, as here; do it with as much ease as he that swimmeth spreadeth forth his hands to swim, Isaiah 25:11,

The chariot and horse] The chieftains of the army.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-76.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The chariot and horse; the men who rode upon and fought from chariots and horses, who fight with most advantage, and usually have most courage; and much more unable were their footmen to resist or avoid the stroke.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-76.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. The chariot and horse—Cavalry and the war-chariot were the terror of ancient warfare.

Dead sleep—The word indicates a profounder sleep than is natural, (Daniel 8:18; Daniel 10:9,) and the language intimates that the judgment was not heralded by any alarm. Whatever physical cause was used, if any, it occasioned no disturbance of the camp. Silently, at the rebuke of Jehovah, from a deeper sleep than was natural they slept the sleep of death. See note on Psalms 46:6


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-76.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Of old. And the favours which had been heaped on the nation. (Calmet) --- Years. Both past and future times; (Haydock) yea, eternity itself, the great occupation of life. (St. Augustine) (Berthier)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-76.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

God of Jacob. See note on Psalms 75:9.

Both the chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep. Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulg, read "the horsemen are stunned".

cast into a dead sleep. One word in Hebrew = stunned.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-76.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Are cast into a deep sleep.—The same Hebrew expression is used of Sisera’s profound slumber (Judges 4:21). Deborah’s Song and Exodus 15 are in the poet’s mind, as they were to the author of Isaiah 43:17, and as they have inspired the well-known lines of Byron’s “Sennacherib.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-76.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

At thy rebuke, O God of Jacob, both the chariot and horse are cast into a dead sleep.
At thy
18:15; 80:16; 104:7; Exodus 15:1,21
both
Exodus 14:27,28; 15:4-6,10; 2 Samuel 10:18; Isaiah 37:36; Ezekiel 39:20; Nahum 1:6; Nahum 2:13; 3:18; Zechariah 12:4
dead
1 Samuel 26:12; Jeremiah 51:39,57

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 76:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-76.html.

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