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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 82:6

 

 

I said, "You are gods, And all of you are sons of the Most High.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Ye are gods - Or, with the prefix of כ ke, the particle of similitude, כאלהים keelohim, "like God." Ye are my representatives, and are clothed with my power and authority to dispense judgment and justice, therefore all of them are said to be children of the Most High.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-82.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I have said, Ye are gods - See the notes at Psalm 82:1. I have given you this title; I have conferred on you an appellation which indicates a greater nearness to God than any other which is bestowed on men - an appellation which implies that you are God‘s representatives on earth, and that your decision is, in an important sense, to be regarded as his.

And all of you are children of the Most High - Sons of God. That is, You occupy a rank which makes it proper that you should be regarded as his sons.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-82.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I have said, ye are gods,.... In the law, Exodus 21:6 or they were so by his appointment and commission; he constituted them judges and magistrates, invested them with such an office, by which they came to have this title; see Romans 13:1, and so our Lord interprets these words, that they were gods "to whom" the word of God came, which gave them a commission and authority to exercise their office, John 10:35, or rather "against whom" it came, pronouncing the sentence of death on them, as in Psalm 82:7, to which the reference is; declaring, that though they were gods by office, yet were mortal men, and should die. The Targum is, "I said, as angels are ye accounted"; and so judges and civil magistrates had need to be as angels, and to have the wisdom of them; see 2 Samuel 14:20. Jarchi interprets it of angels, but magistrates are undoubtedly meant:

and all of you are children of the most High; the Targum here again renders it,

"the angels of the most High:'

and so Aben Ezra explains it of them who are called the sons of God, Job 38:7 but men in power are meant, who, because of their eminency and dignity, their high office, post, and place, are so called; see Genesis 6:2.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-82.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I have said, Ye are gods; and all of you are children of the most High.

Have said — I have given you my name and power to rule your people in my stead.

All — Not only the rulers of Israel, but of all other nations.

Children — Representing my person, and bearing both my name and authority.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-82.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

6I have said, ye are gods. God has invested judges with a sacred character and title. This the prophet concedes; but he, at the same time, shows that this will afford no support and protection to wicked judges. He does not introduce them as speaking of the dignity of their office; but anticipating the style of reasoning which they would be disposed to adopt, he replies, “If you appeal to your dignity as an argument to shield you, this boasting will avail you nothing; yea, rather you are deceiving yourselves by your foolish confidence; for God, in appointing you his substitutes, has not divested himself of his own sovereignty as supreme ruler. Again, he would have you to remember your own frailty as a means of stirring you up to execute with fear and trembling the office intrusted to you.” This verse may also be viewed as addressed by God himself to rulers, and as intimating, that, in addition to his clothing them with authority, he has bestowed upon them his name. This interpretation seems to agree with the language of Christ in John 10:34, where he speaks of those as called gods to whom the word of God came. The passage, however, may be appropriately resolved thus: I grant that ye are gods, and the sons of the Most High (427) But this does not materially alter the meaning. The object is simply to teach that the dignity with which judges are invested can form no excuse or plea why they should escape the punishment which their wickedness deserves. The government of the world has been committed to them upon the distinct understanding that they themselves also must one day appear at the judgment-seat of heaven to render up an account. The dignity, therefore, with which they are clothed is only temporary, and will pass away with the fashion of the world. Accordingly, it is added in the 7th verse, But ye shall die as men. You are armed with power, as if he had said, to govern the world; but you have not on that account ceased to be men, so as to be no longer subject to mortality. The last clause of the verse is translated by some expositors, Ye shall fall like one of the princes; (428) but in my opinion improperly. They think that it contains a threatening of the violent death which would befall these unrighteous judges, corresponding to the sentiment of these lines of a heathen poet: —

Ad generum Cereris sine caede et sanguine pauci,
Descendunt reges, et sicca morte tyranni
.”

“Few kings and tyrants go down to Pluto, the son-in-law of Ceres, without being put to a violent death, before they have completed the ordinary term allotted to the life of mortal man.” (429) That translation being forced, and not such as the words naturally suggest, I have no doubt that princes are here compared to the obscure and common class of mankind. The word one signifies any of the common people. Forgetting themselves to be men, the great ones of the earth may flatter themselves with visionary hopes of immortality; but they are here taught that they will be compelled to encounter death as well as other men. Christ, with the view of rebutting the calumny with which the Pharisees loaded him, quoted this text, John 10:34, “Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods? If he called them gods, unto whom the word of God came, and the Scripture cannot be broken; say ye of him whom the Father hath sanctified and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God?” By these words Christ did not mean to place himself among the order of judges; but he argues from the less to the greater, that if the name of God is applied to God’s officers, it with much more propriety belongs to his only begotten Son, who is the express image of the Father, in whom the Father’s majesty shines forth, and in whom the whole fullness of the Godhead dwells.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-82.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 82:6 I have said, Ye [are] gods; and all of you [are] children of the most High.

Ver. 6. I have said, Ye are gods] As Psalms 82:1, but doubly so, if good too; if they excel both in virtue and power, as Aristotle joineth them, κατ αρετην και την πολιτικην δυναμιν; I have said, is vox potestatis constituentis, whence that of the apostle, All power is of God, Romans 13:1.

And all of you are children of the most High] Invested (as princes’ sons and heirs are oft) with part of my power, and intrusted with the administration of mine earthly kingdom by the exercise of vindictive and remunerative justice, Niceph. 1. 18, scribit summum principem gentis Turcicae dictum fuisse Taifau, i.e. Filium Dei. The Chaldee paraphraseth, As the angels of the High; and Kimchi, As the stars, which have dominion over these inferior bodies. Confer Job 38:7.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-82.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 82:6. I have said, Ye are gods Dr. Wall, in his Critical Notes upon this passage, says, "The name aleim, which is the usual name for God Almighty, having been, in the Pentateuch and other holy books written before this psalm, given sometimes to magistrates, judges, princes, and any of the high powers on earth, (for the proper signification of the word is high powers,) this psalm teaches them in what sense, and with what limitation, this name is allowed them; namely, that though they are suffered to be called aleim, gods, yet they should die like Adam, man; and this verse instructs them, that when they sit in judgment, they should remember, that as they act as masters over other men, so God, their master, the true Aleim, stands over them, and rebukes them upon occasion, as in Psalms 82:2." Dr. Hammond observes, that when our Saviour cites these words, John 10:34 they are introduced thus: Is it not written in your law? Thence the conclusion is necessary, that this book of psalms was among the Jews looked upon as part of the divine law, in a more wide and diffuse notion of the word; i.e. as the writings of the prophets, and of all who were inspired by God, are styled law.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-82.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I have said, Ye are gods; I have given you my name and power to rule your people in my stead.

All of you; not only the rulers of Israel, but of all other nations; for all powers are ordained by God, Romans 13:1.

Children of the Most High; representing my person, and bearing both my name and lively characters of my majesty and authority, as children bear the name and image of their parents.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-82.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. I have said, Ye are gods—God still speaks to the judges. He calls them back to the time when their office was instituted, and they were called “gods,” as officially representing the divine majesty and functions. Thus, in Exodus 21:6; Exodus 22:8-9, where “judges” occurs in the common version, it is God in the Hebrew. He had further guarded the dignity of this office by commanding the people, “Thou shalt not revile the gods,” where the same awful name, Eloheem, God, again occurs. Exodus 22:28.

Children of the Most High—Sons of the Most High, corresponding to gods in the preceding clause. The Saviour quoted this title as applied to men holding a divine commission, (John 10:34-36,) and contrasts his own claim, “whom the Father hath sanctified and sent into the world,” as incomparably greater, even on the principles which the Pharisees themselves admitted. His argument was simply ad hominem.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-82.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

I have said. Compare Exodus 22:9, Exodus 22:28. John 10:34, John 10:35.

children = sons. Compare Luke 6:35.

the MOST HIGH. Hebrew. Elyon. App-4.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-82.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I have said, Ye are gods; and all of you are children of the most High.

I have said, Ye are gods; and all of you are children of the Most High. Princes and judges are "gods" ( '


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-82.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) I have said.—Again the Divine voice breaks the silence with an emphatic I. “From me comes your office and your honoured title, gods; now from me hear your doom. Princes though ye be, ye will die as other men: yea, altogether will ye princes perish.” (For the rendering “altogether,” literally, like one man, see Ezra 2:64; Ezra 3:9, &c.)

It is interesting to notice that Psalms 82:1; Psalms 82:6 were quoted by Constantine at the opening of the council of Nicæa, to remind the bishops that their high office should raise them above jealousy and party feeling. (For the interest gained by the passage from our Lord’s use of it to rebut the charge of blasphemy brought against Him by the scribes, see Note, New Testament Commentary, John 10:34.)


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-82.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I have said, Ye are gods; and all of you are children of the most High.
1; Exodus 22:9,28; John 10:34-36

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 82:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-82.html.

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