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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 84:6

 

 

Passing through the valley of Baca they make it a spring; The early rain also covers it with blessings.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Passing through the valley of Baca make it a well - Instead of בכא bacha, a mulberry-tree, seven MSS. have בכה becheh, mourning. I believe Baca to be the same here as Bochim, Judges 2:1-6, called The Valley of Weeping. Though they pass through this barren and desert place, they would not fear evil, knowing that thou wouldst supply all their wants; and even in the sandy desert cause them to find pools of water, in consequence of which they shall advance with renewed strength, and shall meet with the God of Israel in Zion.

The rain also filleth the pools - The Hebrew may be translated differently, and has been differently understood by all the Versions. מורה יעטה ברכות גם gam berachoth yaateh moreh ; "Yea, the instructor is covered or clothed with blessings." While the followers of God are passing through the wilderness of this world, God opens for them fountains in the wilderness, and springs in the dry places. They drink of the well-spring of salvation; they are not destitute of their pastors. God takes care to give his followers teachers after his own heart, that shall feed them with knowledge; and while they are watering the people they are watered themselves; for God loads them with his benefits, and the people cover them with their blessings.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-84.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Who passing through the valley of Baca - This is one of the most difficult verses in the Book of Psalms, and has been, of course, very variously interpreted. The Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate, Luther, and Professor Alexander, render it a valley of tears. The word “Baca” (בכא bâkâ' ) means properly weeping, lamentation; and then it is given to a certain tree - not probably a mulberry tree, but some species of balsam - from its weeping; that is, because it seemed to distil tears, or drops of balsam resembling tears in size and appearance. It is translated mulberry trees in 2 Samuel 5:23-24; 1 Chronicles 14:14-15; and so in the margin here, “mulberry trees make him a well.” There is no reason, however, to think that it has that meaning here. The true rendering is, “valley of lamentation,” or weeping; and it may have reference to some lonely valley in Palestine - where there was no water - a gloomy way - through which those commonly passed who went up to the place of worship. It would be vain, however, to attempt now to determine the locality of the valley referred to, as the name, if ever given to it, seems long since to have passed away. It may, however, be used as emblematic of human life - “a vale of tears;” and the passage may be employed as an illustration of the effect of religion in diffusing happiness and comfort where there was trouble and sorrow - as if fountains should be made to flow in a sterile and desolate valley.

Make it a well - Or, a fountain. That is, It becomes to the pilgrims as a sacred fountain. They “make” such a gloomy valley like a fountain, or like a road where fountains - full, free, refreshing - break forth everywhere to invigorate the traveler. Religious worship - the going up to the house of God - turns that in the journey of life which would otherwise be gloomy and sad into joy; makes a world of tears a world of comfort; has an effect like that of changing a gloomy path into one of pleasantness and beauty. The idea here is the same which occurs in Isaiah 35:7, “And the parched ground shall become a pool” (see the notes at that passage); and in Job 35:10, “Who giveth songs in the night” (see the notes at that passage); an idea which was so beautifully illustrated in the case of Paul and Silas in the jail at Philippi, when, at midnight they “sang praises to God” Acts 16:25, and which is so often illustrated in the midst of affliction and trouble. By the power of religion, by the presence of the Saviour, by the influence of the Holy Spirit, the Comforter, such times become seasons of purest joy - times remembered ever afterward with most fervent gratitude, as among the happiest periods of life. For religion can diffuse smiles over faces darkened by care; can light up the eye sunk in despondency; can change tears of sorrow into tears of joy; can impart peace in scenes of deepest sorrow; and make the most gloomy vales of life like green pastures illuminated by the brightness of noonday.

The rain also filleth the pools - Margin, “covereth.” This is a still more difficult expression than the former. The Septuagint and the Vulgate render it, “The teacher - the lawgiver - ὁ νομοθετῶν ho nomothetōn - “legislator” - gives blessings.” Luther, “The teachers shall be adorned with many blessings.” Gesenius, “Yea, with blessings the autumnal rain doth cover it.” DeWette, “And with blessing the harvest-rain covers it,” which he explains as meaning,” Where they come, though it would be sorrow and tears, yet they are attended with prosperity and blessing.” Professor Alexander, “Also with blessings is the teacher clothed.” The word rendered “rain” - מורה môreh - is from ירה yârâh to throw, to cast, to place, to sprinkle, and may denote

(1) an archer;

(2) the early rain

(3) teaching, Isaiah 9:15; 2 Kings 17:28; or a teacher, Isaiah 30:20; Job 36:22.

It is rendered rain, in the place before us; and former rain twice in Joel 2:23 (margin, a teacher). The word rendered “filleth” means properly to cover, and would be fitly so translated here. Compare Leviticus 13:45; Ezekiel 24:17, Ezekiel 24:22. The word has not naturally the idea of filling. The word rendered “pools” - ברכות berâkôth - if pointed in one manner - ברכה berêkâh (in the singular) - denotes a pond, pool, or basin of water; if pointed in another manner - ברכה berâkâh - it means blessing, benediction, and is often so used in the Scriptures, Genesis 27:12; Genesis 28:4; Genesis 33:11; Proverbs 11:11, … The rendering of Gesenius, as above, “Yea, with blessings the autumnal rain doth cover it,” (that is, the valley so desolate in the heat of summer - the valley of weeping), would perhaps be the most natural, though it is not easy to see the connection according to this interpretation, or according to any other proposed.

Least of all is it easy to see the connection according to the translation of the Septuagint, the Vulgate, Luther, and Prof. Alexander. Perhaps the connection in the mind of the author of the psalm may have been this. He sees the sterile and desolate valley through which the pilgrims are passing made joyous by the cheerfulness - the happiness - the songs - of those who are on their way to the house of God. This fact - this image - suggests to him the idea that this is similar to the effect which is produced in that valley when copious rains descend upon it, and when, though commonly desolate, it is covered with grass and flowers, or is “blessed” by the rain. This latter image is to his mind an illustration of the happy scene now before him in the cheerful and exulting movements of the pilgrims on their way to the house of God. The one suggests the other; and the psalmist has a combined image before his mind, the one illustrating the other, and both showing how a vale naturally desolate and sterile may be made cheerful and joyous.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-84.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Who passing through the valley of Baca,.... Kimchi interprets it a valley of springs, or fountains, taking the word to be of the same signification as in Job 38:16, and mention being made of a well and pools in it, or of mulberry trees, which grow, as he says, in a place where there is no water, and such a place was this; and therefore pools or ditches were dug in it, and built of stone, to catch rain water for the supply of travellers; and so Aben Ezra says, it is the name of a place or valley where were trees, called mulberries; and is by some thought to be the same with the valley of Rephaim, where we read of mulberry trees, 2 Samuel 5:22, the Septuagint render it "the valley of weeping", and the Vulgate Latin version "the valley of tears"; which have led some interpreters to think of Bochim, a place so called from the children of Israel weeping there, Judges 2:1, it does not seem to design any particular place, through which all the males could not pass from the different parts of the land of Israel, as they came to Zion at the three grand festivals; but any difficult and troublesome place, any rough valley, or dry and thirsty land, where there was no water: so saints are passengers, travellers, or pilgrims, in this world, and often pass through a valley; are in a low valley, through the weakness of grace; a rough one, through affliction; and a dark one, through desertion and temptation; and a valley of weeping and tears, on account both of outward and inward trials. The way to Zion, or to the house and ordinances of God below, lies through the valley of weeping; none come rightly thither but who come weeping over their sins and unworthiness; or by repentance towards God, and by looking by faith to Christ whom they have pierced, and mourning for it; see Jeremiah 50:4 and the way to Zion above lies through a vale of tears, shed in plenty by reason of sin, a man's own, original and actual, the sins of professors and profane, by reason of Satan's temptations, the hidings of God's face, and the distresses, divisions, and declensions of Zion; yet relief is afforded, help is given, refreshment is had, in this valley, for such passengers:

they make it a well; either the valley a well with their tears, an hyperbolical expression, like that in Lamentations 2:18 or they account it as such, a dry valley, as if it was a well watered place; look upon all their toil and labour in going to the house of God as a pleasure; and esteem all reproach, afflictions, and persecutions, they meet with from the world, or relations, for the sake of religion, as riches and honours; or they find a supply, which is kindly and graciously given, even rivers in high places, and fountains in the midst of valleys, streams of divine love, and precious promises in a wilderness, Isaiah 41:18 "or make him a well"F1מעין ישיתוהו "fontem constituunt eum", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, Ainsworth; "Deum ipsum", Piscator, Gejerus, Michaelis. : that is, God himself; they account of him as such; they find him to be so, and make use of him as one, who is a well of living waters; such are his love, his covenant, and his grace; such are his Son and his fulness, his Spirit, the gifts and graces of it; all which yield a rich supply:

the rain also filleth the pools; of the word and ordinances: "or the rain covereth with blessings"F2ברכות יעטה מורה "quam in benedictionibus operit pluvia", Cocceius. ; the rain of divine love covers the passengers with spiritual blessings, which flow from it; Christ, whose coming is compared to the rain, brings a train of blessings with him to his people; and the Gospel, which drops as the rain, and distils as the dew, is full of the blessings of Christ; is a glorious revelation of them, and is the means of conveying them to the saints; or the "teacher covereth", or "is covered with blessings"F3"Benedictionibus operietur docens", Montanus; "benedictiones induit doctor", Gejerus, Michaelis; so Gussetius, p. 725. ; the great Teacher of all, God, Father, Son, and Spirit; the Father teaches all his children to great profit and advantage, and covers or blesses them with all spiritual blessings; the Son is a teacher come from God, and is covered or loaded with the blessings of goodness, and communicates them to his disciples and followers; and the Spirit teacheth all things, and takes of the things of Christ, the blessings of his grace, and covers his people with them; and all under teachers, ministers of the Gospel, are clothed with salvation, and come forth in the fulness of the blessing of the Gospel of Christ.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-84.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

[Who] passing through the valley of c Baca make it a well; the rain also filleth the pools.

(c) So that the poor birds have more freedom than I.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-84.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

valley of Baca — or, “weeping.” Through such, by reason of their dry and barren condition, the worshippers often had to pass to Jerusalem. As they might become wells, or fountains, or pools, supplied by refreshing rain, so the grace of God, by the exercises of His worship, refreshes and revives the hearts of His people, so that for sorrows they have “rivers of delight” (Psalm 36:8; Psalm 46:4).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-84.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Who passing through the valley of Baca make it a well; the rain also filleth the pools.

Baca — A dry valley in the way to Jerusalem, here put for all places of like nature.

Make a well — They dig divers little pits or wells in it for their relief.

The rain — God recompenses their diligence with his blessing, sending rain wherewith they may be filled.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-84.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

6They passing through the valley of weeping, will together make it a well. The meaning of the Psalmist is, that no impediments can prevent the enlightened and courageous worshippers of God from making conscience of waiting upon the sanctuary. By this manner of speaking, he confirms the statement which he had previously made, That nothing is more desirable than to be daily engaged in the worship of God; showing, as he does, that no difficulties can put a stop to the ardent longings of the godly, and prevent them from hastening with alacrity, yea, even though their way should be through dry and barren deserts, to meet together to solemnise the holy assemblies. As the Hebrew word הבחא, habbacha, when the final letter is ה, he, signifies tears, and when the final letter is א , aleph, a mulberry tree, some here read valley of tears, and others, valley of the mulberry. The majority of interpreters adopt the first reading; but the other opinion is not destitute of probability. (465) There is, however, no doubt, that dry and barren deserts are here to be understood, in travelling through which, much difficulty and privation must be endured, particularly from the want of water; drink being of all other articles the most necessary to persons when travelling. David intended this as an argument to prove the steadfastness of the godly, whom the scarcity of water, which often discourages travelers from prosecuting their journey, will not hinder from hastening to seek God, though their way should be through sandy and and vales. In these words, reproof is administered to the slothfulness of those who will not submit to any inconvenience for the sake of being benefited by the service of God. They indulge themselves in their own ease and pleasures, and allow nothing to interfere with these. They will, therefore, provided they are not required to make any exertion or sacrifice, readily profess themselves to be the servants of God; but they would not give a hair of their head, or make the smallest sacrifice, to obtain the liberty of hearing the gospel preached, and of enjoying the sacraments. This slothful spirit, as is evident from daily observation, keeps multitudes fast bound to their nests, so that they cannot bear to forego in any degree their own ease and convenience. Yea, even in those places where they are summoned by the sound of the church-bell to public prayers (466) to hear the doctrine of salvation, or to partake of the holy mysteries, we see that some give themselves to sleep, some think only of gain, some are entangled with the affairs of the world, and others are engaged in their amusements. It is therefore not surprising, if those who live at a distance, and who cannot enjoy these religious services and means of salvation, without making some sacrifice of their worldly substance, remain lolling at home. That such may not live secure and self-satisfied in the enjoyment of outward prosperity, David declares, that those who have true heart religion, and who sincerely serve God, direct their steps to the sanctuary of God, not only when the way is easy and cheerful, under the shade and through delightful paths, but also when they must walk through rugged and barren deserts; and that they will rather make for themselves cisterns with immense toil, than be prevented from prosecuting their journey by reason of the drought of the country.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-84.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Baca

Or, weeping. Not a literal valley, but any place of tears. Cf. Psalms 23:4.


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Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Psalms 84:6". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/psalms-84.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 84:6 [Who] passing through the valley of Baca make it a well; the rain also filleth the pools.

Ver. 6. Who passing through the valley of Baca] εν τη κοιλαδι του κλαυθμωνος (Sept.). That is, of tears, say some; of mulberry trees, say others; the one are moist, the other use to grow in more dry places. Between them both they may serve, saith one, to make up a more complete emblem of this miserable world, made up of woes and wants. In hoc exilio, saith Bernard, in hoc ergastulo, in hac peregrinatione, in hac valle lachrymarum, &c.

Make it a well] They are as cheerful in their travel to God’s house as if they had plenty of water all the way. Finis edulcat media, the joy of the Lord is their strength, whereby they are carried on an end, as they say, to their journey’s end, the joyful preconceit of appearing before God in Zion allaying their great thirst.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-84.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Passing; or, being used to pass; for he seems not to speak of one particular act, but of a common course or custom.

Baca; a place, so called, which some Jewish and other writers affirm to have been a very dry place, and therefore incommodious for travellers in those hot countries, and in hot seasons; which place may be here mentioned not exclusively to other ways and passages, for this highway being but one, and on one side of Jerusalem, could not be a general way for all the Israelites thither, but synecdochically for all places of like nature, which made their journey to Jerusalem unpleasant or inconvenient. But their zeal for God’s service did easily overcome this and other difficulties. Or, the valley of tears, as this valley might be called, for the trouble or vexation which travellers found there by reason of drought, or otherwise. A well, or wells, i.e. they dig divers little pits or wells in it for their relief. This trouble they willingly undertook rather than to neglect the opportunity of going up to Jerusalem at their solemn times. And possibly they did this, not only for themselves, but for the benefit of other travellers who came after them; whereby they showed both their piety and charity.

The rain also filleth the pools; God recompenseth their diligence in making pits, or little pools, or cisterns with his blessing, sending rain wherewith they may be filled, and the thirsty travellers refreshed. Possibly the words may be thus rendered, which is more agreeable to the order of the Hebrew text, yea, or also, (and so the Hebrew particle gam hath that emphasis which, as some learned interpreters observe, is not given to it in other translations; they do not only make little pits or wells, as it was now said, but also,) pools or cisterns (for this Hebrew word is by the learned rendered both ways) which (so the relative particle is to be understood, as it is very frequently in many texts of Scripture) the rain filleth, or may fill, i.e. which may receive and keep the rain which God sendeth for the refreshment of these travellers, whose great numbers made the provision of water more necessary. But it is not necessary to understand this and the foregoing clause of what these passengers did for their own use, as they travelled through this or such, like places; but it may be meant of what pious persons did before that time, who, having their hearts set upon God’s house, and the pathways leading to it, as was said, Psalms 84:5, and being desirous to advance the worship of God, and to encourage the people to come to Jerusalem, endeavoured to make those ways (some parts whereof were very incommodious) easy and convenient; and particularly, because those Eastern countries were hot and dry, and springs of water were scarce there, as we may learn from Genesis 26:15 Jude 1:15, and many other passages of sacred Scripture and other authors, which was a great annoyance to travellers, they made these pits and pools or cisterns in such places where they were most necessary, and through which great numbers of people passed in their journey to the house of God.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-84.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. Valley of Baca—Valley of weeping, or lamentation. That there was a valley of this name would appear from the manner of referring to it, and also from the use of the definite article, הבכא, (the Baca.) But it is not the head of the valley of Rephaim, which Josephus (Ant., Psalms 7:4) and the Septuagint (in 2 Samuel 5:23) have called “the place of weeping,” nor the Bochim near Bethel, of Judges 2:1; Judges 2:4-5. It must have been some road, or section of a road, notable in the pilgrim routes, or in the route of the returning exiles, (see Jeremiah 31:8-9; Jeremiah 50:4-5,) painful to travel and specially arid and waste. Yet even this, to the devout and joyful pilgrim, would be made delightful, as if filled with fountains and covered with verdure.

The rain also filleth the pools—Instead of “pools,” read blessings, as in 2 Chronicles 20:26; instead of “filleth,” read covereth; and for “rain,” understand the early, or autumnal rains, (beginning with November,) which prepare the ground for the seed, as in Joel 2:23. The sense is, The early rain, which quickens the parched ground into fertility, covereth the “valley of weeping” with blessings. In Palestine there is little rain from the last of April to the first of November.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-84.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 84:6. Who passing — Or, being used to pass; for he seems not to speak of one particular act, but of a common course or custom; through the valley of Baca — A place so called, which some Jewish and other writers affirm to have been a very dry place, and therefore incommodious for travellers in those hot countries, and in hot seasons. Which place may be here mentioned, not exclusively of other ways; for this highway being but one, and on one side of Jerusalem, could not be a general way for all the Israelites thither; but synecdochically for all places of like nature, which made their journey to Jerusalem unpleasant or inconvenient. But their zeal for God’s service did easily overcome this and other difficulties. Or the clause may be rendered, the valley of tears, as this valley might be called, for the trouble or vexation which travellers found there by reason of drought, or other inconveniences. Make it a well — Or, wells; that is, they dig divers little pits or wells in it for their relief. This trouble they willingly undertook, rather than to neglect the opportunity of going up to Jerusalem at their solemn times. And possibly they did this, not only for themselves, but for the benefit of other travellers who came after them; whereby they showed both their piety and charity. The rain also filleth the pools — God recompenseth their diligence in making pits, or cisterns, with his blessing, sending rain wherewith they may be filled, and the thirsty travellers refreshed. It may be proper to inform the reader, that the words may be rendered more agreeably to the Hebrew text, yea, or also pools, or cisterns; that is, they make pools or cisterns, which the rain filleth, or, may fill; which may receive and keep the rain that God sendeth for the refreshment of these travellers, whose great numbers made the provision of water more necessary. But it is not necessary to understand this, and the foregoing clause, of what these passengers did for their own use, as they travelled through this, or such like places; but it may be meant of what pious persons had done before that time; who, having their hearts set upon God’s house, and the ways leading to it, and being desirous to advance the worship of God, and to encourage the people to come to Jerusalem, endeavoured to make those ways easy and convenient; and particularly because those eastern countries were hot and dry, and springs of water were scarce there.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-84.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Ever. The Pythagoreans settled their differences before sunset. (Plut.) --- "Cherish not, mortals, an immortal wrath." (Arist. Rhet. ii. 21.) (Haydock) --- As long, O God, as we see not our brethren restored, we shall think that thou art not perfectly reconciled us. (Calmet)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-84.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

of Baca = of weeping. All the ancient versions so render it.

make it. Septuagint reads "He maketh it".

a well = a place of springs.

rain = the early rain.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-84.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Who passing through the valley of Baca.—All the ancient versions have “valley of weeping,” which, through the Vulg. vallis lacrymosa, has passed into the religious language of Europe as a synonym for life. And Baca (bâkha) seems to have this signification, whatever origin we give the word. The valley has been variously identified—with the valley of Achor (Hosea 2:15; Joshua 7:24); the valley of Rephaim (2 Samuel 5:22)—a valley found by Burckhardt in the neighbourhood of Sinai; and one, more recently, by Renan, the last station of the present caravan route from the north to Jerusalem. Of these, the valley of Rephaim is most probably in the poet’s mind, since it is described (Isaiah 17:5) as sterile, and as the text stands, we think of some place devoid of water, but which the courage and faith of the pilgrims treats as if it were well supplied with that indispensable requisite, thus turning adversity itself into a blessing. He either plays on the sound of the word (Baca, and becaîm) or the exudations of the balsam shrub gave the valley its name.

The rain also filleth the pools.—That rain is the right rendering of the Hebrew word here appears from Joel 2:23. The rendering pools follows the reading, berechóth; but the text has berachóth, “blessings,” as read by the LXX. and generally adopted now. Render yea, as the autumn rain covers (it) with blessings, i.e., just as the benign showers turn a wilderness into a garden, so resolution and faith turn disadvantage to profit. (Comp. Isaiah 35:6-8; Isaiah 43:18 seq.)


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-84.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Who passing through the valley of Baca make it a well; the rain also filleth the pools.
Who
66:10-12; John 16:33; Acts 14:22; Romans 5:3-5; 8:37; 2 Corinthians 4:17; Revelation 7:14
Baca, etc
or, mulberry-trees, make him a well, etc. Baca is probably a large shrub, which the Arabs still call baca, (see on 2 Sa 5:23;) and this valley, as Celsius observes, seems to be one "embarrassed with [such] bushes and thorns, which could not be passed without labour and tears,"--bacah, as 7 MSS., Aquila, and Vulgate read.
2 Samuel 5:22-24
the rain
68:9; 2 Kings 3:9-20
filleth
Heb. covereth.

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 84:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-84.html.

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