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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 84:9

 

 

Behold our shield, O God, And look upon the face of Your anointed.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Behold, O God, our shield - We have no Protector but thee. Thou seest the deadly blows that are aimed at us; cover our souls; protect our lives!

Look upon the face of thine anointed - Consider the supplications sent up by him whom thou hast appointed to be Mediator between thee and man - thy Christ. But some apply this to David, to Zerubbabel, to the people of Israel; and each has his reasons.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-84.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Behold, O God our shield - Our defense, as a shield is a defense in the day of battle. Compare Psalm 5:12, note; Psalm 18:2, note; Psalm 33:20, note. It is an appeal to God as a protector. The psalmist was an exile - a wanderer - and he looked to God as his defense.

And look upon the face of thine anointed - Look favorably upon; look with benignity and kindness. The word anointed here is the word “Messiah” - משׁיח mâshı̂yach (Greek, Χριστός Christos “Christ”; see the notes at Matthew 1:1). Compare the notes at Psalm 2:2. It here refers, however, evidently to the author of the psalm; and the word used is evidence that the author was David, as the anointed of the Lord, or someone set apart to the kingly office. It is true that this word was applicable to other kings, and also to priests and prophets, but the circumstances in the case concur best on the supposition that David is referred to. The allusion here is not to Christ; and the language does not suggest or justify the use which is often made of it when prayer is offered, that “God would look upon us in the face of his anointed” - whatever may, or may not be, the propriety of that prayer on other, grounds.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-84.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Rejoice, O God our shield,

And look upon the face of thine anointed.

For a day in thy courts is better than a thousand.

I had rather be a door-keeper in the house of my God,

Than to dwell in the tents of wickedness.

For Jehovah God is a sun and a shield:

Jehovah will give grace and glory;

No good thing will he withhold from them that walk uprightly.

O Jehovah of hosts,

Blessed is the man that trusteth in thee."

"O God our shield" (Psalms 84:9). Dummelow explained that the word `shield' in this passage could apply either to God or to the `anointed.'[6] And, of course, in that spirit which seems so generally characteristic of modern translators of the Bible, such versions as the Good News Bible and the RSV make the word apply to Israel's king, despite the fact that older versions properly refer it to God. The notion that any of that long line of David's successors were in any sense a "shield" of the people is ridiculous; and besides that, verse 11 makes it absolutely certain that "our shield" is not some wicked king of Israel but God Himself.

"And look upon the face of thine anointed" (Psalms 84:9). Many of the writers accept this as a reference to the king of Israel, more likely, of the Southern Israel.

"In the life of the true Israelite who was acquainted with the promises of God to David, prayer for the royal house would have occupied a place of unusual prominence."[7]

"One day in thy courts is better than a thousand" (Psalms 84:10). This being true, Christians should not have any trouble in seeing that one day in worship is better than a thousand on the beach!

"I had rather be a door-keeper in the house of my God than to dwell in the tents of wickedness" (Psalms 84:10). "Being doorkeepers in the house of God was the special duty of the sons of Korah, who are mentioned in the title of the Psalm (1 Chronicles 9:19)."[8] This has been a memory verse for thousands of Christians.

"Than to dwell in the tents of wickedness" (Psalms 84:10). In ancient times, especially among the Hebrews, the common dwelling places were indeed `tents'; and the reference here is actually to any `dwelling places' of the wicked, however magnificent.

One should not miss the implication here that non-worshippers of God are assumed to be "wicked." It is also still true that the wicked, generally speaking, are the people who don't worship God; and the righteous people are those who do. Men may cite exceptions, but the rule is still true.

"Jehovah will give grace and glory" (Psalms 84:11). J. S. Norris' famous hymn, "Where He Leads Me I will Follow" (words by E. W. Blandly) devotes almost all of verse 2 to these words.

"He will give me grace and glory,

He will give me grace and glory,

He will give me grace and glory,

And go with me, with me, all the way."[9]SIZE>

"Blessed is the man that trusteth in thee" (Psalms 84:12). Indeed, indeed! Here is a beatitude fully qualified to rank among the glorious beatitude spoken by the Son of God in the Sermon on the Mount. This is the third time that a blessing is pronounced in this marvelous psalm.

Blessed are they that dwell in thy house (Psalms 84:4).

Blessed is the man whose strength is in thee (Psalms 84:5).

Blessed is the man that trusteth in thee (Psalms 84:12).SIZE>


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-84.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, O God our shield,.... Which may be considered either as the character of God, who is addressed, who was David's shield, and the shield of his people, to protect and defend them from their enemies, and is the shield of all the saints; this favour encompasses them as a shield, and his truth is their shield and buckler; his veracity and faithfulness, in keeping covenant and promises; and so is his power, by which they are kept unto salvation; see Psalm 3:3, or else it belongs to other persons and things the psalmist desires God would behold, in agreement with the following clause. Jarchi interprets it of the house of the sanctuary, as a shield unto them; much better Aben Ezra of the king their protector; and makes the sense of the petition to be, that God would save our king; it is best to apply it to Christ, afterwards called a sun and shield; see on Psalm 84:11, and to whom the following clause belongs:

and look upon the face of thine anointed; meaning either himself, David, the anointed of the God of Jacob, who was anointed with oil, in a literal sense, king of Israel, by the appointment and order of the Lord himself; and his request is, that God would look upon his outward state and condition, which was a distressed and an afflicted one, with an eye of pity and compassion, he being deprived of sanctuary worship and service, and of the presence of God there; see Psalm 132:1 or rather he has a view to the Messiah, the Lord's Christ, or Anointed, the anointed Prophet, Priest, and King, anointed with the oil of gladness, the grace of the Spirit, without measure; and so the sense is, that though he and his petitions were unworthy of notice, yet he entreats that God would look upon his Son the Messiah, and for his sake hear and answer him; look upon his person, and accept him in him, the Beloved; upon his future obedience and righteousness, and impute it to him; upon his sufferings, and death he was to endure, to save him from his sins; upon his blood to be shed for the remission of them, as he had looked upon the blood of the passover, upon the doorposts of the Israelites, and saved them when he destroyed the firstborn of Egypt; and upon his sacrifice, which is of a sweet smelling savour; and upon his fulness, for the supply of his wants. Kimchi takes it to be a prayer for the speedy coming of the Messiah.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-84.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Behold, O God our shield, and look upon the face of thine g anointed.

(g) That is, for Christ's sake, whose figure I represent.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-84.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

God is addressed as a shield (compare Psalm 84:11).

thine anointed — David (1 Samuel 16:12).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-84.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, O God our shield, and look upon the face of thine anointed.

Look — Cast a favourable eye towards him.

Anointed — Of me, who though a vile sinner, am thine anointed king.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-84.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 84:9 Behold, O God our shield, and look upon the face of thine anointed.

Ver. 9. Behold] Not only hear, Psalms 34:15, with the note.

Look upon the face of thine anointed] Christi, cuius festina adventum, saith Kimchi; do me good for Christ’s sake.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-84.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

No one can be at a loss to explain this verse, which contains an immediate address to God in the name of Christ. For who is God's anointed but Jesus? Here is a verse all over gospel. No New Testament believer can put up a more faithful petition with reference to Jesus, than is here put up by the church of the Old Testament saints. Oh! for grace to be in the daily use of it. And while God the Father proclaims, as he doth from heaven concerning Jesus, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye him; do thou, my soul, carry back with thee God's own words, in God's own authority, and say, Behold, O God, our shield, and look upon the face of thine Anointed!


Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-84.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Look upon the face; do not turn away thine eyes from him, as men do from those whom they hate or despise, but cast a favourable eye towards him. By face he means either his person, the word face being oft redundant, as it is Genesis 43:3, or his state and condition.

Of thine anointed: either,

1. Of Christ, whose proper name is the Messiah, or the Anointed. So the meaning may be, Lord, I deserve not one good look from thee, because by my great wickedness I have procured thy just displeasure, and this banishment; but look upon thy Christ, whose coming and meritorious passion, though future to us, is present to thee, and for his sake look upon me. Or,

2. Of me, who, though a vile sinner, am thine anointed king, 2 Samuel 12:7 23:1.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-84.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9. Our shield—Our protector; so the word is figuratively used Psalms 47:9; Hosea 4:18, where shields is rendered rulers, because they are the natural protectors of the people. The title points to the imperilled state of the nation.

Look upon the face of thine anointed—To “look upon the face,” in oriental phrase, is to give assurance of favour. To “look upon the face” of a suppliant is to grant his request. If he has offended and asks mercy, instead of saying, “I forgive you,” the answer is, “I have seen thy face.” David said of Absalom, “Let him turn to his own house, and let him not see my face,” (2 Samuel 14:24;) a mark of high displeasure. Genesis 43:3; 2 Samuel 3:13. But who is the “anointed” here mentioned? Those who think David wrote the psalm apply the title to him. But Zerubbabel must be understood rather, who, with Joshua the high priest, (one the head of the spiritual, and the other of the secular, interests of the nation,) are called the “anointed ones,” or those consecrated with oil. Zechariah 4:14. These leaders of the nation built the great altar, (Ezra 3:2,) and also the temple, (Ezra 5:2,) and the public prosperity rested with them. See Haggai 1:1, and Zechariah 3, 4, The prayer assumes that if God “look upon the face” of the representatives of the nation in this crisis, the nation will rise from its ruins. Spiritually Christ is our representative, God’s “anointed,” in whose face he can look complacently and grant us peace.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-84.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Hear. Hitherto the prophet had been distracted by the thought of his people's misery. (St. Augustine) --- In me, is not expressed in Hebrew. --- Heart. Some of the ancients add, "to him." (Calmet) --- The Septuagint seem to have had a copy different from the present Hebrew, "But let them not turn again to folly;" (Protestants; Haydock) though the sense is much the same. They may have read lobom lie, "their heart to God," (Berthier) or lobsle, (Calmet) "the heart, Sela;" instead of lecisla, "to folly." (Haydock) --- Those Israelites who had given away to idolatry, were little inclined to return to their own country, at the invitation of Cyrus. Though Christ came to save all, only men of good will obtained his peace, Luke ii. 4., and John i. 5. (Calmet) --- There is no peace for the wicked, Isaias xlviii. 22., and Philippians iv. 9. (Berthier) --- The redemption of the world was here revealed. (Worthington) (Menochius)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-84.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

shield: i.e. God"s provision in Messiah. He is our Shield (Genesis 15:1). Faith"s shield (Ephesians 6:16). This shield includes: (1) Favour (Psalms 5:12); (2) Salvation (Psalms 18:35); (3) Truth (Psalms 91:4). And "Favour" includes Life (Psalms 30:5); Mercy (Isaiah 60:10); Preservation (Psalms 86:2); Security (Psalms 41:11); Remembrance and Salvation (Psalms 106:4). Compare Psalms 115:9-11.

Thine Anointed = Thy Messiah. Not on us.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-84.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Behold, O God our shield, and look upon the face of thine anointed.

Behold, O God our shield. In the Hebrew, "our shield" stands first for emphasis: all our hope of being shielded from the foe rests on thee: "behold," therefore, all the circumstances of our case, David uses the plural "our," not my, to imply that his people's safety is involved in his. And look upon the face of thine anointed - (cf. Psalms 132:10; Psalms 43:5). In looking upon the face of God's Anointed Son, the Father becomes "our shield" from Satan and all evil.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-84.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) Shield . . . . anointed.—These are here in direct parallelism. So in Psalms 89:18. (See Note, and comp. Psalms 47:9, Note.)


Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-84.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, O God our shield, and look upon the face of thine anointed.
our
11; 98:1; Genesis 15:1; Deuteronomy 33:29
the face
2:2,6; *marg:; 89:20; 1 Samuel 2:10; 2 Samuel 23:1; 2 Chronicles 6:42; Acts 4:27

Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 84:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-84.html.

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