corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 96:1

 

 

Sing to the LORD a new song; Sing to the LORD, all the earth.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Sing unto the Lord a new song - A song of peculiar excellence, for in this sense the term new is repeatedly taken in the Scriptures. He has done extraordinary things for us, and we should excel in praise and thanksgiving.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-96.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

O sing unto the Lord a new song - See the notes at Psalm 33:3. This is the only addition made to the original form of the psalm. The word new here implies that there was some fresh occasion for celebrating the praises of God; that some event had occurred, or that some truth relating to the divine character had now been made known, which could not well be expressed in any psalm or hymn then in use. It is a call on all to celebrate the praises of the Lord in a “new” song - new, particularly, as it calls on “all the earth” to join in it; and possibly this was designed to suggest the idea that while that temple stood, a dispensation would commence, under which the distinction between the Jews and the Gentiles would be broken down, and all mankind would unite in the praise of God.

Sing unto the Lord, all the earth - All nations. All people had occasion to bless his name; to praise him. What he had done, what he was still doing, was of interest to all lands, and made an appeal to all people to praise him. The psalm is constructed on this supposition, that the occasion for praise referred to was one in which all people were interested; or, in other words, that Yahweh was the true God over all the nations, and that all people should acknowledge him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-96.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

PSALM 96

CALLING FOR THE GENTILES TO WORSHIP THE RIGHTEOUS GOD

"This psalm develops a larger view that is not restricted to Israel. Israel is not even mentioned, and the call to worship is addressed to `all nations and all creatures.'"[1] Whereas, in Psalms 95, Israel appears as the "sheep of the Good Shepherd's pasture," that viewpoint is replaced here with, "The more general knowledge that God is the Creator of the heavens and the source of all righteousness and truth."[2]

The Septuagint (LXX) ascribes this psalm to David; and "Significantly, Psalms 95 is written again, with very little change, in 1 Chronicles 16:23-33."[3] In the Chronicles rendition of Psalms 96, not only is David declared as the author, but the very time of his writing it was given as the occasion, namely, when David appointed Asaph and his brethren for certain musical responsibilities in the tabernacle (1 Chronicles 16:7).

We must inquire, therefore, what basis is it upon which scholars boldly declare the psalm to have been written "in the times of the later Hebrew?" Rawlinson identified that basis as, "The style, phraseology and iteration, especially of Psalms 96:1,2,7,8, and 13."[4] To us this is simply ridiculous. In the first place, modern scholars simply do not know that much about the linguistic abilities of King David; and secondly their `conclusion' based upon what they claim to know, is a very poor basis indeed for contradicting a plain statement in the Word of God. We may be absolutely certain that David wrote the psalm, and that he did so upon the occasion outlined in God's Word. Now, it might be true of course, that later copyists, translators, or compilers of the psalms might have reworked it to produce changes which have led to some false scholarly conclusions, but it is still true that David wrote it.

How do the radical critics get around their contradiction of the Old Testament in their denials of Davidic authorship? A good example of how they do it is provided in the opinion of Addis, "This psalm was inserted in Chronicles, not by the Chronicler himself, but by a later hand."[5]

This, of course, appeals to an "interpolator," and degrades almost an entire chapter of 1Chronicles to an interpolation. Where is the evidence of any such thing? What manuscripts or versions omit that part of Chronicles? No evidence is cited; none exists. A mere man's allegation is supposed to nullify a chapter of the word of God.

INTERPOLATIONS, ETC.

There are indeed examples in the Bible of interpolations, as in the instance of Acts 8:37, which is properly omitted in the ASV and subsequent versions. Even in that instance of it, however, the interpolation is absolutely the truth. Any thoughtful person is appreciative of the scholarship which strives to delete genuine interpolations, etc. from the Bible.

However, we shall express a word of caution about the blind acceptance of the claims and allegations of certain schools of interpreters whose a priori disbelief of the Bible and their evident purpose of destroying every word of it as a genuine revelation from Almighty God cast grave doubt upon many of their assertions.

Given the unbelief of many writers and their avowed enmity against the Bible, the careful student should always remember that there are a host of weapons in the arsenal of Biblical enemies.

These are copyists, redactors, editors, compilers, interpolators, translators, glossaters, revisionists, arrangers, etc.

Now our word of caution is simply this. Can we depend upon men whose purposes and intentions toward the Bible are enemical and destructive - can we depend upon them always to employ such devices as we have mentioned in honesty and fairness?

Psalms 96:1-3

THE WORSHIP OF GOD TO BE UNIVERSAL

"O sing unto Jehovah a new song:

Sing unto Jehovah all the earth. Sing unto Jehovah, bless his name;

Show forth his salvation from day to day.

Declare his glory among the nations,

His marvelous works among all the peoples."

"All the earth ... among the nations ... all the peoples" (Psalms 96:1-3). It would be difficult to find a paragraph with any greater stress of the truth that God's "salvation" was never intended for Jews only, but for "all the earth." The call of the Gentiles into God's service is absolutely declared here as a commandment of God.

"Sing... sing ... sing" (Psalms 96:1-2). Singing is the invariable earmark of the redeemed. The worship of God always abounds with singing. "Nothing, listless, boring, or stale befits God's worship; not merely a song is required, but a new song![6]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-96.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

O sing unto the Lord a new song,.... A famous excellent one, suited to Gospel times, on account of the new benefit and blessing of redemption and salvation lately obtained by the Messiah; which should be sung to him, who is the Lord or Jehovah here designed, by all the redeemed ones, Revelation 5:9; see Gill on Psalm 33:3, the Targum adds,

"sing, ye angels on high:'

sing unto the Lord all the earth: not the whole land of Israel only, as Aben Ezra interprets it; though here the Saviour first appeared, taught his doctrines, wrought his miracles, suffered, and died for the salvation of his people; here the angels first begun the new song; and here those that believed in him first expressed that spiritual joy which afterwards spread through the whole world, and who are here called upon to sing; namely, all those that are redeemed from among men, throughout all the earth: believing Gentiles are here intended: the Targum is,

"sing before the Lord, all ye righteous of the earth.'


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-96.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

O sing a unto the LORD a new song: sing unto the LORD, all the earth.

(a) The prophet shows that the time will come, that all nations will have opportunity to praise the Lord for the revealing of his gospel.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-96.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

O sing unto the LORD a new song: sing unto the LORD, all the earth.

O sing — Upon this new and great occasion, not the removal of the ark, but the coming of the Messiah.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/psalms-96.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1Sing unto Jehovah a new song This commencement shows that, as I have already observed, the Psalmist is exhorting the whole world, and not the Israelites merely, to the exercise of devotion. Nor could this be done, unless the gospel were universally diffused as the means of conveying the knowledge of God. The saying of Paul must necessarily hold true,

“How shall they call upon him in whom they have not believed?” (Romans 10:14.)

The same Apostle proves the calling of the Gentiles, by adducing in testimony of it, “Praise the Lord, ye Gentiles, with his people” — from which it follows, that fellowship in the faith stands connected with the joint celebration of praise, (Romans 15:11.) Besides, the Psalmist requires a new song, (75) not one which was common, and had formerly been raised. He must therefore refer to some unusual and extraordinary display of the Divine goodness. Thus, when Isaiah speaks of the restoration of the Church, which was wonderful and incredible, he says, “Sing unto the Lord a new song,” (Isaiah 42:10.) The Psalmist intimates accordingly, that the time was come when God would erect his kingdom in the world in a manner altogether unlooked for. He intimates still more clearly as he proceeds, that all nations would share in the favor of God. He calls upon them everywhere to show forth his salvation, and, in desiring that they should celebrate it from day to day, would denote that it was not of a fading or evanescent nature, but such as should endure for ever.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-96.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE EXCELLENCE OF THE GOSPEL

‘A New Song.’

Psalms 96:1

This psalm may be divided into four strophes of three verses each (the last strophe, however, swells to four verses); and in each of these one feature of the excellence of the gospel is set forth.

I. Its everlasting freshness (Psalms 96:1-3).—The poet calls his own psalm ‘a new song,’ that is to say, it is inspired by a new experience and filled with fresh feeling. Each day has its own problems and difficulties, and, therefore, the gospel which man requires is one which can accompany him through all the windings of his history, and still have a message for his new needs. It must be able in the same way to visit every shore, and adapt itself to all the varieties of mankind. It must have a message for the dreamy East and the strenuous West; for the degraded tribes of Africa and the South Seas, and the cultivated children of the civilised races. The gospel is all this, and, therefore, our psalm says, ‘Declare His glory among the heathen, His wonders among all people.’

II. The Deity it announces (Psalms 96:4-6).—The second excellence of the gospel is that the God whom it makes known is worthy to be an object of worship for all the children of men. This can by no means be said of other religions. This psalm says, ‘The gods of the nations are idols,’ or, as the word ought rather to be translated, ‘nonentities.’ On the most favourable views that can be taken of any of them, the heathen religions stand far beneath that of Christ, and they chiefly serve to bring out its excellences by contrast. The God of the Bible stands in a unique position far above all the deities of the heathen; the more His character is studied the more admirable is it seen to be; as this psalm says, ‘Honour and majesty are before Him: strength and beauty are in His sanctuary.’

III. The worshippers it produces (Psalms 96:7-9).—Another excellence of the gospel is the character produced in those who worship the God of revelation. Like deity, like worshipper—this is an invariable rule. If the deity be cruel and impure, so will be the worshippers; if, on the contrary, honour, beauty, and strength are his attributes, these will appear also in his worshippers. Many of us could say that the strongest proof which we have ever received of its reality has been the character of its professors. May God give us grace to pass on in our own persons the blessed tradition!

IV. Its effects in the world (Psalms 96:10-13).—The last excellence of the gospel dwelt upon is its power to transform the earth and make it an abode of righteousness and happiness. Well may the heathen be told, as this psalm calls upon the professors of the true religion to tell them, that the reign of God, if universally established, would mean the cessation of anarchy and oppression, and such a general diffusion of the blessings of peace and prosperity that it would seem as if all nature were rejoicing in man’s joy—as if the sky were answering the earth, and the sea calling to the dry land, and the fields whispering their gladness to the forests.

Rev. A. R. C. Dallas.

Illustration

‘We learn from 1 Chronicles 16 that this psalm formed part of the hymn of praise which David “delivered to thank the Lord into the hand of Asaph and his brethren,” on the occasion of the bringing up the Ark into the tent on Mount Zion which David had pitched for it. In spirit it is a millennial psalm, and is thus in keeping with the group of psalms in which it occurs (92–100), all of which point on to the Sabbath of this world’s history—the “rest that remaineth for the people of God” (Hebrews 2:9). The subject is a call to praise, in view of Christ’s second advent and glorious reign. To apply it, look forward to the glorious day of the Lord’s coming, and realise its approach that you may prepare for it.’


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-96.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 96:1 O sing unto the LORD a new song: sing unto the LORD, all the earth.

Ver. 1. O sing unto the Lord a new song] For this new mercy of the ark now brought into Jerusalem from the house of Obededom, 1 Chronicles 15:25, but especially of Christ, typified by the ark, who should be preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up to glory, 1 Timothy 3:16.

Sing unto the Lord, all the earth] Which they could not do aright till they had heard, believed, and were sealed, Ephesians 1:13. Unbelievers can have no true notion of God but as of an enemy; and, therefore, all their verbal praises are but a black sanctus, suitable to such saints.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-96.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 96.

An exhortation to praise God, for his greatness, for his kingdom, and for his general judgment.

THIS psalm is attributed to David in the Greek copies. It was composed by him upon the translation of the ark from the house of Obed-edom to the place that he had prepared for it on mount Sion: and it is extant in 1 Chronicles 16 only differing in some particulars, which are supposed to have been added by Ezra upon rebuilding the temple after the captivity. But, says Bishop Patrick, it never had a full completion till the time of the Messiah, who was indeed the temple of God, which came to dwell among us. Several of the Jewish Rabbis acknowledge that it belongs to his times, and the Syriac title informs us, that it was a prophesy of the coming of Christ, and the calling of the Gentiles.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-96.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Here is a new and repeated call to praise Jehovah; and, like the former Psalm, chiefly on account of redemption. It is altogether a gospel Psalm. Blessed the soul that in reading or singing it finds the Holy Ghost pointing to Christ, and enjoys Christ in it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-96.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PSALM 96

THE ARGUMENT

This Psalm was composed by David upon occasion, or at the time, of the bringing of the ark of God into the tabernacle which David had prepared for it in Zion, as may be gathered by comparing it with 1 Chronicles 16:7,23,24, &c., where almost the whole Psalm is to be found, But as the ark was an evident type of the Messiah, which David very well knew, as hath been oft noted before; so David’s thoughts, or at least the design of God’s Spirit, which indited this Psalm, was extended beyond and above it, even to the times of the Messiah, and to his glorious and universal kingdom, in which not the Jews only, but the heathen nations also, should worship the true God, and kiss his Son the Messiah.

All the inhabitants of the earth and sea are called to praise the Lord for his great honour and majesty, Psalms 96:1-7; for his wise governing the world, Psalms 96:8-10. Heaven and earth are called to rejoice before him for his righteous judgment, Psalms 96:11-13.

A new song, upon this new and great occasion; not the removal of the ark, wherein there was nothing new but an inconsiderable circumstance of place, and that not yet fixed; but the coming of the Messiah, and the confirming of the new covenant by his blood, and the calling of the Gentiles.

All the earth; all the nations of the earth, who shall then partake of those great blessings and privileges which are now peculiar to Israel.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-96.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1. A new song— “Besides the psalms and songs which have been written.”Kimchi. But more than this, “new” in the sense of unusual, out of the common course, above the common measure, spiritual, joyful, Messianic. See Psalms 33:3; Psalms 98:1; Isaiah 42:10; and still more perfectly unfolded in Revelation 5:9-10


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-96.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Same. Huic. The title is the same as usual in the Septuagint. (Menochius) --- It occurs not in Hebrew. The psalm may refer to David's establishment on the throne, after the death of Saul, or Absalom, or to the return from captivity, and to the first and second coming of Christ. (Calmet) --- This last seems to be the most literal sense. (Berthier) --- To him. Christ's body on the third day, and many souls were restored to life. [Matthew xxvii. 52.] --- Islands. We have great reason to rejoice in being educated in the true faith, and we may hope that the Catholic religion will once more flourish in these isles. (Worthington) --- The Son of man shall have dominion over all, Daniel vii. 14. His Church is persecuted, as the waves beat against an island. (Eusebius) (Calmet)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-96.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the LORD. Hebrew. Jehovah. App-4.

a new song. Psalm 96 is the call; Psalm 97 is the answer. Compare Psalm 98 and Psalm 99. The subject is the coming rest for the earth, to which creation looks forward Romans 8:18-23).

the earth. This is the subject of Book IV. See notes on p. 809.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-96.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

O sing unto the LORD a new song: sing unto the LORD, all the earth.

Psalms 96:1-13 -Call to the earth to sing a nmw song to Yahweh (Psalms 96:1-3): He is in majesty, strength and beauty, worthy of this (Psalms 96:4-6); triple call to give Him glory and worship (Psalms 96:7-9); all who have heard that Yahweh has assumed the kingdom are to tell it to the pagan; so shall the world be established in righteousness, and all nature shall rejoice before the coming Judge (Psalms 96:10-13); the thrice-repeated "give" (Psalms 96:7-8) answers to the thrice-repeated "sing" (Psalms 96:1-2); Messiah's coming to set up God's kingdom on earth was a theme calculated to comfort Judah when threatened by the Assyrian world-power. This psalm is a later expansion of David's psalm, delivered to Asaph, to thank the Lord on the setting up of the ark in the tabernacle in Zion (1 Chronicles 16:23-33 : cf. with Psalms 96:10; Isaiah 52:7; with Psalms 96:1; Isaiah 42:10; with Psalms 96:3; Isaiah 60:6; Isaiah 66:18-19). The Septuagint, Vulgate, Ethiopic, Arabic, and Syriac, attribute the psalm to David.

O sing unto the Lord a new song - (Psalms 33:3) A new song, as being for a new benefit never received before.

Sing unto the Lord, all the earth. Isaiah 42:10 is an expansion of 1 Chronicles 16:23, from which also this Psalms 96:1-13 is taken. This psalm, and Psalms 98:1-9, which begins with the same words, like the second part of Isaiah (from Isaiah 40:1-31) points to the future glorious kingdom of Messiah, reigning in Jerusalem over the whole Gentile world, as well as over Israel. The germ of the same bright hope appears in David's psalm, in 1 Chronicles 16:1-43, but not so fully developed as in this series of psalms, and in the probably contemporary prophet Isaiah. The fullest development appears in Revelation 5:9-10, "They sung a new song," etc.: "Thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood, out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation," "and we shall reign, on the earth." Yarchi observes that wherever "a new song" is mentioned, it is to be understood of Messianic times (cf. Psalms 96:13).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-96.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) A new song.—See Note, Psalms 33:3. It appears to have been a kind of national and religious “lyric cry” after the Restoration. (Comp. Isaiah 42:10.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-96.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

O sing unto the LORD a new song: sing unto the LORD, all the earth.
A. M. 2962. B.C. 1042. O sing
33:3; 98:1; 149:1; 1 Chronicles 16:23-33; Revelation 5:9; 14:3
sing unto
67:3-6; 68:32; Romans 15:11

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 96:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-96.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology