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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 97:10

 

 

Hate evil, you who love the LORD, Who preserves the souls of His godly ones; He delivers them from the hand of the wicked.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Ye that love the Lord hate evil - Because it is inconsistent with his love to you, as well as your love to him.

He preserveth the souls of his saints - The saints, חסידיו chasidaiv, his merciful people: their souls - lives, are precious in his sight. He preserves them; keeps them from every evil, and every enemy.

Out of the hand of the wicked - From his power and influence.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-97.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Ye that love the Lord, hate evil - Show your love for the Lord “by” hating all that is evil; that is, all that he hates, or that is evil in his sight. There can be no true love for God where evil is not hated in all its forms, since it is the object of the divine abhorrence. We cannot be like God unless we love what he loves, and hate what he hates. There is nothing more clearly affirmed in the Scriptures than that in order to the love of God there must be the hatred of all that is wrong, and that where there is the love of sin in the heart, there can be no true religion. Compare the notes at Isaiah 1:16-20.

He preserveth the souls of his saints - The lives of his saints, or his holy ones. That is, he guards them from danger, and watches over them with a careful eye. See Psalm 3:8; Psalm 37:39.

He delivereth them out of the hand of the wicked - That is, he often does this; they may expect that he will do it. He does not, indeed, always deliver them from the temporal calamities which wicked people bring upon them - for they are not unfrequently persecuted and wronged; but ultimately he will deliver them altogether from the power of the wicked. In heaven none of the machinations of wicked people can reach them. At the same time it is also true that God often interposes in behalf of his people, and delivers them as such from the designs of the wicked: that is, he delivers them because they are righteous, or because they are his friends. Compare the notes at Daniel 3:16-17, notes at Daniel 3:24-25; notes at Daniel 6:18-23.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-97.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Ye that love the Lord, hate evil,.... The evil of sin, which is to be hated, because of the evil nature of it, it being exceeding sinful; and because of its evil consequences, bringing death, ruin, and destruction with it to the souls of men, unless grace prevents; and disquietude, distress, and trouble to the saints themselves; and because it is hateful to God, being contrary to his nature, will, and law, and is hated by Christ; and therefore those that love him should hate that, shun it, avoid it, depart from it, and abstain from all appearance of it; as all such will that love him in sincerity above all persons and things; and all of him, and that belong to him, his people, ways, worship, truths, and ordinances: and such are they that have seen the loveliness of him, and know his love, and have had it shed abroad in their hearts; and these will not only hate the evil of sin, but evil men; not their persons, but their actions and conversations; and will avoid them, and have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness:

he preserveth the souls of his saints; that are set apart by him, and chosen in him to be holy; that are sanctified by his blood, and by his Spirit and grace, and to whom he is made sanctification: the "souls" of these, their better and more noble part, which are dear to him, and he has redeemed by his blood, and whose salvation he has obtained, and they still receive, he "preserves" from the evil of sin, from its governing and damning power, from a final and total apostasy by it, from ruin and destruction through it, from being hurt by the second death; and he preserves them from all their enemies, sin, Satan, and the world, from being destroyed by them, safe to his kingdom and glory; therefore he is to be loved, and sin to be hated by them:

he delivereth them out of the hand of the wicked; of wicked and unreasonable men, into whose hands they sometimes fall, cruel and bloodthirsty persecutors; as he is able to deliver them, so oftentimes he does; and will, ere long, put them entirely out of their reach. Kimchi interprets this of the deliverance of the Jews from the captivity of Babylon, Media, and Persia.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-97.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Ye that h love the LORD, hate evil: he preserveth the souls of his saints; he delivereth them out of the hand of the wicked.

(h) He requires two things from his children: the one that they detest vice, the other, that they put their trust in God for their deliverance.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-97.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10Ye that love Jehovah, hate evil Those that fear God are here enjoined to practice righteousness, as Paul says,

“Let every one that nameth the name of Christ depart from iniquity,”
(
2 Timothy 2:19)

He shows from the very nature of God, that we cannot be judged and acknowledged to be his servants unless we depart from sin, and practice holiness. God is in himself the fountain of righteousness, and he must necessarily hate all iniquity, unless we could suppose that he should deny himself; and we have fellowship with him only on the terms of separation from unrighteousness. As the persecution of the wicked is apt to provoke us to seek revenge, and unwarrantable methods of escape, the Psalmist guards us against this temptation, by asserting that God is the keeper and protector of his people. If persuaded of being under the Divine guardianship, we will not strive with the wicked, nor retaliate injury upon those who have wronged us, but commit our safety to him who will faithfully defend it. This gracious act of condescension, by which God takes us under his care, should serve as a check to any impatience we might feel in abstaining from what is evil, (103) and preserving the course of integrity under provocation.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-97.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

LIFE AND CHARACTER

‘O ye that love the Lord, see that ye hate the thing which is evil.’

Psalms 97:10 (Prayer Book Version)

Holy Scripture teaches us that the outcome and the end of life is not what a man has done, or what a man has said, but it is what life has made of the man. Not so much what man has made of the life, but what life has made of the man. Life is a machinery with its complicated system for the working out of character, and at the end the soul comes out beaten upon by all the manifold forces and influences of life; the soul comes out of all those forces which baffle analysis, and there is your man. Holy Scripture says that the outcome of life is the formation of character, and that, compared with this, nothing else in the world matters.

I. Character is defined by one of two movements of the human will.—That man is a good man, whatever his creed may be, who is always striving after what he thinks is the best. And that man, whatever his creed may be, is not a good man who, when he sees the good, deliberately turns away from it. That man is not good who, seeing the best, gropes after what he likes, and not after what he ought to like, who aims not at the high but at the low. That man is not a good man who does not aim at what he thinks to be noblest and the purest and the best. Underneath all the variety of nationality, race, and religion, underneath all variety of these things that change and give colour to life, underneath all is this distinction between men good and bad. ‘I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God’—the dead, morally small, intellectually small, morally great and intellectually great—‘I saw them stand before God,’ and I observed a division: and what was the cause of that division? One man could say with truth, ‘Lord, when saw I Thee in prison, or sick, and did not try to help?’ And the other man saw good and turned away; saw light and turned away; saw moral rectitude and chose moral evil.

II. Here is the key to human life.—You tell me about a man. He may be a great public character, and you say to me, ‘He is a man of great gifts and great wealth.’ And I say to you, ‘Tell me something about the man.’ And you say, ‘He is a man of extraordinary fascination and wonderful power of influence.’ I say, ‘Tell me something about the man.’ You say, ‘He is a man of wonderful power of mind and body and reason.’ I say, ‘I do not know the man yet; tell me something about the man.’ And then you say, ‘And all these powers of influence and fascination and wealth he used for his own ends.’ Now I know your man. That one act of the will is the secret of that man’s life, and all the rest is only a setting to the picture. But, further, you may say, ‘Well, but I cannot feel that I am perfectly free. I cannot feel that my will is absolutely free.’ No man in his senses will ever say to you that at any given moment of your life you are free from anything that you have done in the past. It is in the power of every man to work himself out of bad habits. He can get free by struggle, hard struggle. Not to-day, not to-morrow, it may be, not for a year, perhaps, but he can get free if he will struggle in the light of God, and in the power of God’s might he can get free, and at last he will sing with joy and peace, ‘The snare is broken and I am delivered.’

III. And now, how shall these things be?—I find that I seem to have two wills. ‘I am,’ you say, ‘a man of strong purpose, and yet, when I come to things moral, I seem to be powerless. What am I to do?’ St. Paul says that behind your conscience, and behind your reason, you can set a person, a person whom you love. And now supposing that you set the greatest and the dearest of men, Jesus Christ, and supposing you learn to love Him, and supposing that you hear His voice, the voice of One who died for the honour of God and for the sake of men, the voice that called the Magdalene to His feet. Suppose you hear that voice sounding through your conscience, will not at length devotion to Him, the love of Him, draw all your passions, one by one, upon the side of right as against wrong? ‘O ye that love the Lord! see that ye hate the thing that is evil.’

IV. There are many things that society hates.—It hates being dull, it hates being bored, it hates badly fitting clothes, it hates long sermons, it hates being found out. It hates evil when evil touches its pocket or injures its character in the face of men, but it does not hate evil as evil. Ye that love the Lord, see that ye hate above all things the thing that is evil. And as you learn to love the Lord, as you learn to hate evil, you will learn to love good, until at length, stealthily, quietly, in moments unknown and unmeasured, one by one, all your errant desires will come back from the side of wrong and take their place on the side of right, until at last your whole nature is brought into submission, and your whole heart flung down at the feet of God.

Prebendary Storrs.

Illustration

‘Sometimes we see a man who has been raised from poverty up to wealth, and we say, “I liked that man better when he was poor, for when he was poor there seemed to be a splendour of character about him, which has now been overlaid by all this comfort and luxury and ease.” Here is a fine lady who is lying upon her death-bed. She has had her day, and she has had her sway, and she has done her acts, and she has said her words, and she has had her receptions, and, as you, her friends, stand by her bedside, why is it that you do not feel any of that triumph which comes from a sense of strength and power? It is because you know, who knew her well, that, underneath all, her character has deteriorated, and she has become small instead of great. Or, once more, you stand by the coffin of your dead friend. You have crossed his hands in calmness and peace, and closed his eyes. Why is it that, in spite of all he has done—and he seems to have done great things—why is it that you are unhappy? It is because you know that, underneath it all, his moral nature has worsened. He has become a poorer character than he was.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-97.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 97:10 Ye that love the LORD, hate evil: he preserveth the souls of his saints; he delivereth them out of the hand of the wicked.

Ver. 10. Ye that love the Lord] As having tasted of Christ’s sweetness, being justified by his merit, and sanctified by his Spirit, 1 Peter 2:4, 1 Corinthians 6:11; carried after him with strength of desire, Psalms 42:1, and delight, Psalms 73:25. Such as these only are Christ’s true subjects; others will pretend to him, but they are but hangbys, unless the love of Christ constrain them to hate evil, to hate it as hell, Romans 12:9. Sin seemeth to have its name of Sena to hate (the word שׁנא here used), because it is most of all to be hated, as the greatest evil; as that which setteth us farthest from God, the greatest good αποστυγουντες. This none can do but those that love the Lord Christ in sincerity; for all hatred comes from love. A natural man may be angry with his sin, as a man is sometimes with his wife or friend for some present vexation; but hate it he cannot; yea, he may leave it (for the ill consequents of sin), but not loathe it. If he did, he would loathe all, as well as any, for hatred is ever against the whole kind of a thing, saith Aristotle, το μισος προς τα γενη (Rhetor. lib. 2).


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-97.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

A rule is here given to judge of real love. If I love Jesus, I shall love his people. If I love him, I love what he loves, and hate what he hates. See an appeal of this kind to the Lord, much in point, Psalms 34:21-22.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-97.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ye that love the Lord; O all you who love and worship the true God and his anointed, and rejoice in the establishment of his kingdom.

Hate evil; show your love to him by your abhorrency of all idolatry, which is sometimes called evil or sin by way of eminency, and of all other wickedness. And although you that love the Lord Christ and his kingdom will meet with many troubles and persecutions, yet be not discouraged, for he will preserve you in troubles, and in his time deliver you out of them all.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-97.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. Ye that love the Lord, hate evil—Learn to abhor it from this example of divine judgments against idolatry.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-97.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Since God loves righteousness, it is only fitting that those who love Him should hate evil. By doing Song of Solomon , they become the objects of His blessing rather than partakers of His discipline.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/psalms-97.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 97:10. Ye that love the Lord — O all you that love and worship the true God, and rejoice in the establishment of his kingdom; hate evil — Show your love to him by hating all sin in temper, word, and work. Thus the psalmist, “having sung the glory of the Redeemer, now delineates the duty of the redeemed. They are characterized by their love of God; they are enjoined to hate evil; the hatred of which indeed is a consequence and a sure proof of that love, when it is genuine and sincere. Religion must be rooted in the heart and spring from thence. A Christian must not only serve God outwardly, but must inwardly love him; he must not content himself with abstaining from overt acts of sin, but must truly hate it. They who do so are the saints of God, whose souls he preserveth from evil, and will finally deliver from the evil one and his associates, by a happy death and a glorious resurrection.” — Horne.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-97.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

evil. Hebrew. ra"a". App-44.

souls. Hebrew. nephesh. App-13.

saints = gracious (i.e. graced) ones.

wicked = lawless (plural) Hebrew. rasha, ". App-44.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-97.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Ye that love the Lord.—Notwithstanding certain points of similarity between this verse and Psalms 34:10-20; Psalms 37:28, and between Psalms 97:12 and Psalms 32:11, the psalmist shows himself at the close more than a compiler—a true poet.

Hate evil.—It is better to point for the indicative, They who love Jehovah, hate evil, in order to avoid the awkward transition in the next clause. This practical test of true religion can never be obsolete. Love of God implies the hatred of all He hates. A heathen writer has expressed this in a striking way. Philosophy, holding a dialogue with Lucian, is made to say, “To love and to hate, they say, spring from the same source.” To which he replies, “That, O Philosophy, should be best known to you. My business is to hate the bad, and to love and commend the good, and that I stick to.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-97.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Ye that love the LORD, hate evil: he preserveth the souls of his saints; he delivereth them out of the hand of the wicked.
Ye that
91:14; Romans 8:28; 1 Corinthians 8:3; James 1:12; 2:5; 1 Peter 1:8; 1 John 4:19; 5:2,3
hate
34:14; 36:4; 37:27; 101:3; 119:104,163; Proverbs 3:7; 8:13; Amos 5:15; Romans 7:15,24; 12:9
preserveth
31:23; 37:28,39,40; 145:20; Proverbs 2:8; Isaiah 45:17; John 20:28-30; Romans 8:28-30; 1 Peter 1:5
delivereth
125:3; Jeremiah 15:21; Daniel 3:28; 6:22,27; 2 Thessalonians 2:8-12; 3:2; 1 John 5:18; Revelation 13:8

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 97:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-97.html.

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