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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 98:1

 

 

O sing to the LORD a new song, For He has done wonderful things, His right hand and His holy arm have gained the victory for Him.

Adam Clarke Commentary

A new song - A song of excellence. Give him the highest praise. See on Psalm 96:1; (note).

Hath done marvellous things - נפלאות niphlaoth, "miracles," the same word as in Psalm 96:3, where we translate it wonders.

His holy arm - His Almighty power: -

Hath gotten him the victory - לו הושיעה hoshiah llo, "hath made salvation to himself."


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-98.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

O sing unto the Lord a new song - Compare Psalm 33:3; Psalm 96:1. “For he hath done marvelous things.” Things suited to excite wonder, or to fill the mind with astonishment. See Psalm 77:14; Psalm 86:10.

His right hand - The instrument by which we execute any purpose. Compare Isaiah 59:16; Isaiah 63:5.

And his holy arm - The arm of his holiness; that is, his arm put forth in a righteous cause, or vindicating that which is right.

Hath gotten him the victory - literally, “has worked salvation for him:” for himself, or in his own cause. The victory - the salvation - was really in defense of his own government; in maintaining his own authority against those who set themselves in opposition to it. What is here said may be applied to all that God does. It is really in his own cause, in order to maintain the principles of his own administration.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-98.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

PSALM 98

PRAISE GOD FOR HIS RIGHTEOUSNESS;

A GLIMPSE OF THE FINAL JUDGMENT DAY

"This is a jubilant song of praise to God, because of the marvel that the divine revelation of salvation should be known to the ends of the earth."[1] If all people really understood what a marvel the salvation of God actually is, perhaps there would be a more general song of thanksgiving arising from the hearts of mankind.

Just think! In all the history of the universe, there is no such thing as "forgiveness" until we come to Christ. None of the laws of nature ever forgave a violator even for the fraction of a second. All nature is red in tooth and fang and claw. No hawk ever forgave the prey; no wild beast ever forgave the victim. No serpent ever forgave the careless heel.

When the angels of God kept not their first estate, but sinned, there was no hint of forgiveness. The same verse of the holy text which tells of their sin speaks of their destruction and of their being reserved in chains of darkness till the day of judgment and the destruction of ungodly men.

Even under the Law of Moses, although a provisional "forgiveness" was extended to the righteous, even so, "There was a remembrance of sins year by year," due to the fact of its being impossible that, "the blood of bulls and goats should take away sin" (Hebrews 10:3-4).

At the World's Fair in New York City in 1964, the Moody Institute staged an exhibit showing the marvel of forgiveness. The nearest star to our earth is four light years distant, and this means that the light we see began its journey to our earth two million years ago! God, being ubiquitous, everywhere simultaneously throughout His whole universe, sees all things continually. All the sins of everyone's past life are clearly visible to God; in a sense, He is still seeing everything anyone ever did. How can He forgive us, when He is still seeing us commit whatever sins may have marred our lives? It is a marvel indeed; and not only does God forgive, He can and does forget the sins He forgives!

The very first verse of this psalm calls it a "New Song"; and we believe that is because it sings of "salvation," that is, the forgiveness which God brings to mankind in Christ. What a gloriously new thing indeed is God's forgiveness! Halley's remark that, "Since this is a new song, it may be one of those which will be sung in heaven,"[2] is undoubtedly the truth.

Adam Clarke has this regarding Psalms 98:

"In the Hebrew, this psalm is simply called `A Psalm.' In the Chaldee it is labeled, `A prophetic Psalm.' In the Vulgate, the LXX, and the Ethiopic it is called, `A Psalm of David.'

"In the Syriac, it is attributed to David and stated to have been composed concerning the restoration of the Israelites from Egypt. Spiritually, this psalm applies to the Advent of the Messiah and the calling of the Gentiles into the Christian faith.

"It was probably written to celebrate the deliverance of Israel from their Babylonian captivity; but it is to be understood prophetically of the redemption of the world by Jesus Christ."[3]SIZE>

The closing verses of the psalm are eschatalogical and relate to the Final Judgment of the Great Day. "The psalm closes with the prophecy that the Judgment will be characterized by righteousness and equity."[4]

"In this psalm, there are no comparisons with the heathen, no instructions for correct worship, all is joy and exhilaration."[5] It is one of the happiest of the psalms.

Barnes observed that, "This psalm does not admit of a particular analysis,"[6] We shall study it one verse at a time.

Psalms 98:1

"Oh sing unto Jehovah a new song;

He hath done marvelous things:

His right hand, and his holy arm, have wrought salvation for him."

"A new song." (See the chapter introduction for comments on this.) The second and third clauses here may be understood as reference to that "forgiveness" (salvation) which God has achieved for mankind.

"Salvation for him." This means salvation "for God" in the sense of it's being God's achievement, not for himself, but for mankind.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-98.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

O sing unto the Lord a new song,.... An excellent one unto the Lord Christ, on account of the great work of redemption and salvation wrought out by him; and because of the new and living way opened by him, and because of the new dispensation of the Gospel, which takes place through him, and for the reasons next mentioned; See Gill on Psalm 96:1,

for he hath done marvellous things; by assuming human nature, in that he, being God, became man, took flesh of a virgin, even pure and uncorrupted, a clean thing out of an unclean; which he took into personal union with himself, and that for the sake of sinful creatures: a most marvellous affair this! which calls for a new song from men, as it had from the angels. In this nature he taught wonderful doctrines, at which his hearers were astonished, wondering from whence he had his wisdom; and in it he did many miraculous works, which filled them with amazement above measure; and especially in it he performed the amazing and surprising work of man's redemption, an instance of the marvellous lovingkindness and astonishing wisdom of God; performed in a manner quite stupendous, through Christ's being made under the law both the precept and penalty of it; through his being made sin and a curse for men, even for the ungodly, sinners and enemies; a redemption which is of the souls of men from sin, Satan, and the law; a complete and plenteous one, which includes and secures all the blessings of grace and glory, justification, pardon, adoption, and eternal life. To which may be added the resurrection of himself from the dead, his ascension to heaven, the effusion of the extraordinary gifts of the Spirit on the apostles, the wonderful success of the Gospel in the Gentile world, the support of his interest against all the powers on earth, the destruction of the man of sin, the calling of the Jews, and the bringing in of the fulness of the Gentiles in the latter day; all which marvellous events require a new song of praise: another reason of which follows:

his right hand and his holy arm hath gotten him the victory: over sin, Satan, the world, death, and hell, in which he has made his people sharers, yea, more than conquerors; and therefore may well sing the new triumphant song to him: the words may be rendered, "hath brought salvation to him"F2הושיעה לו "salutem attulit ei", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator; so Tigurine version, Munster, Cocceius, Gejerus, Michaelis. ; as in Isaiah 59:16; to him personally, he raising himself from the dead, as a triumphant Conqueror; to him mystically, his body the church, to whom he is the author of salvation; or to him, that is, to his Father, in obedience to whose will he wrought out salvation for his people, and for the honour of his name, and for the glorifying of his perfections. This was done by him alone, by his right hand of power, by the mighty arm of his strength, and which no mere creature could ever have performed: and this he did in a way of holiness; his holy arm did it in a way that maintains and secures the glory of divine holiness and justice.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-98.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

"A Psalm." O sing a unto the LORD a new song; for he hath done marvellous things: his right hand, and his holy b arm, hath gotten him the victory.

(a) That is, some song newly made in token of their wonderful deliverance by Christ.

(b) He preserves his Church miraculously.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-98.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Psalm 98:1-9. In view of the wonders of grace and righteousness displayed in God‘s salvation, the whole creation is invited to unite in praise.

gotten … victory — literally, “made salvation,” enabled Him to save His people.

right hand, and … arm — denote power.

holy arm — or, “arm of holiness,” the power of His united moral perfections (Psalm 22:3; Psalm 32:11).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-98.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1Sing unto Jehovah a new song I have already remarked, that the expression here used denotes an extraordinary, not a common, ascription of praise. This appears from the reason assigned for it, That God had manifested his salvation in a singular and incredible manner. For having spoken of marvelous things, he represents this as the sum of all, that God had procured salvation with his own right hand; (108) that is, not by human means, or in an ordinary way, but delivering his Church in an unprecedented manner. Isaiah enlarges upon this miracle of God’s power:

“The Lord looked if there were any to help, and wondered that there was no intercessor: therefore his own arm brought salvation, and his righteousness sustained him,”
(
Isaiah 59:16)

In both passages the arm of God stands opposed to ordinary means, which although when employed they derogate nothing from the glory of God, yet prevent us from so fully discovering his presence as we might otherwise do. The language of the Psalmist amounts to a declaration that God would not save the world by means of an ordinary kind, but would come forth himself and show that he was the author of a salvation in every respect so singular. He reasonably infers that mercy of such a wonderful, and, to us, incomprehensible kind, should be celebrated by no ordinary measures of praise. This is brought out still more clearly in the verse which follows, where it is said that his salvation and righteousness are shown to the nations What could have been less looked for than that light should have arisen upon these dark and benighted places, and that righteousness should have appeared in the habitations of desperate wickedness? Salvation is mentioned first, although it is, properly speaking, the effect of righteousness. Such an inversion of the natural order is often observed in stating divine benefits; nor is it surprising that what is the means, and should be mentioned first, is sometimes set last, and follows by way of explanation. I may add, that the righteousness of God, which is the source of salvation, does not consist in his recompensing men according to their works, but is just the illustration of his mercy, grace, and faithfulness.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-98.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE NEW SONG

‘O sing unto the Lord a new song.’

Psalms 98:1

The psalm divides itself with great naturalness into three equal parts of three equal verses each. The whole is an expression of praise, and the different parts deal with the theme of praise, the mode of praise, and the spirit of praise.

I. The theme (Psalms 98:1-3).—The psalm commences with the announcement that it is a new song, and it is obvious that it has been written to celebrate a new event in the history of Israel. A new event deserves a new song. The particular occurrence referred to may very likely be the return from the Exile; but the psalm may be applied to any great manifestation of the power and love of God.

The sacred poet says that he has been inspired to sing because God has done marvellous things. The return from the Exile was a marvel, but far more marvellous is the life of Christ. It is an inexhaustible magazine of marvels. What wonder there is in the incarnation, in the teaching of Christ, in His miracles, in His character, in His death! Then the experience of every Christian is a marvel—a world of marvel. What wonder in the awakening of a soul, in conversion, in sanctification!

Although in nature and in providence there are innumerable reasons for praising God, the songs of redeemed souls will always be principally inspired by the work of salvation. God is glorious as Creator, but the name by which the saints always know Him is ‘the God of salvation.’

II. The mode (Psalms 98:4-6).—The reasons for praising God having been fully given in the first division of the psalm, the sacred poet now calls upon those who have been blessed to praise Him. First, in Psalms 98:4, he addresses all in general; then in Psalms 98:5 he specially addresses the Levites; and finally, in Psalms 98:6, he addresses the priests. The first are to praise with the voice, and they are exhorted to make a loud noise. Are not congregations too much afraid of abandonment in this part of worship? The joyful noise of a great multitude is a far more impressive thing than the most artistic music of a few. Yet the latter ought not to be absent.

III. The spirit (Psalms 98:7-9).—It is sometimes said sarcastically that gratitude is a vivid anticipation of favours to come, and all who are wont to give to the poor are aware how often beggars put forward the plea that we have helped them before. We are rather disposed to resent this argument, and look upon our having given already as a reason why we should not give again. But God does not resent this kind of asking; He delights when those who come to Him make His former gifts a reason for believing that He will give more, and His acts of salvation are expressly intended to awaken the expectation of greater acts yet to come. So this psalm concludes with the anticipation that the Lord is coming to be King of the whole earth; and every part of creation, land and ocean, rivers and mountains, are called upon to welcome Him, as a crowd with shouting and clapping of hands welcome the approach of a sovereign.

Illustration

‘All the earth Jehovah made, and all the earth must sing to Him. The multitudinous languages of the sons of Adam who were scattered at Babel, will blend in the same song when the people are gathered at Zion. Not men alone, but the earth itself is to praise its Maker. Made subject to vanity for awhile by a sad necessity, the creation itself is also to be delivered from the bondage of corruption, and brought into the glorious liberty of the children of God, so that sea and forest, field and flood, are to be joyful before the Lord. Is this a dream? Then let us dream again.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-98.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 98:1 « A Psalm. » O sing unto the LORD a new song; for he hath done marvellous things: his right hand, and his holy arm, hath gotten him the victory.

A Psalm] The Greek addeth, of David. A man might think it were rather of John Baptist pointing out Christ, and his kingdom, as if already come, with the great good thereby accruing to the saints.

Ver. 1. O sing unto the Lord a new song] See Psalms 96:1, and observe how the compiler of the psalms hath hereabout set together sundry psalms of the same subject.

His right hand and his holy arm] His is emphatic, and exclusive; q.d. Christ alone hath done the deed, he is our sole Saviour, Isaiah 59:16; Isaiah 63:5. In the justification of a sinner Christ and faith are alone, saith Luther, Tanquam sponsus et sponsa in thalamo. As wax and water cannot meet together, so neither can Christ and anything else in this work. Away, then, with that devilish doctrine of the saints’ merits, Quibuscunque tandem pigmentis illita obtrudatur. If any commend or go after any other way to salvation besides Christ, he doth according to the Greek proverb, draw mischiefs to himself; as the wind Caecius doth clouds, Kακα εφ εαυτον ελκει ως ο Kαικιας νεφος, (Aristot. in Meteor.).


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-98.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 98.

The Psalmist exhorteth the Jews, the Gentiles, and all creatures, to praise God.

A Psalm.

This psalm has several expressions like those which are used in Psalms 1 96: and therefore probably it was composed by David. The Greek copies call it, "A Psalm of David." Perhaps it was written upon occasion of some remarkable deliverance which God had lately granted to Israel, as an earnest of future blessings; especially of the coming of that great blessing, the Lord Christ, to give salvation to his faithful people. Grotius is of opinion, that this psalm is a kind of summary or abridgement of Moses's song in Exodus 15.

Psalms 98:1. Hath gotten him the victory Hath brought him salvation. This in the strictest letter belongs to the prophetic sense, accomplished in the resurrection of Christ. For then, in an eminent manner, did the divine power, called God's right hand, and God's fidelity in making good his promise, fitly stiled his holy arm, bring him, that is Christ, relief; in raising his dead body out of the grave. See Dr. Hammond.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-98.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This, like the foregoing, is a true gospel Psalm. Jesus is adored for the victories of his redemption; and the Church, both Jew and Gentile, is called upon to sing aloud the triumphs of his grace.

A Psalm.

Psalms 98:1

It may be truly said of our Jesus, that he alone hath gotten the victory, for of the people there was none with him; Isaiah 63:3. But what is this new song the church is called upon to sing? It can be none but that of redemption. For creation work had been long finished, and long and faithfully recorded: and ever is to be recorded as an ancient, lasting, eternal song. The morning stars then sang together, and the sons of God shouted for joy. Job 38:7. But when redemption work came forward, and was perfected, a new note, a new song, was added to the subject, of mercy, and the church is called upon, as being most highly interested, to sing it. The song, and all the subject of it, is Jesus.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-98.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PSALM 98

THE ARGUMENT

The matter and scope of this Psalm is the same with the former, and is an evident prediction of the coming of the Messias, and of the blessed effects thereof.

The psalmist exhorteth Jews, Gentiles, and all the creatures to praise God for his truth and salvation.

God by his own only power hath overcome all difficulties and enemies, and hath in spite of all set Christ upon his throne, and propagated his kingdom in the world.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-98.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1. A new song—See note on Psalms 96:1.

His right hand, and his holy arm—Symbols of his most excellent power and majesty.

Hath gotten him the victory—The form of expression denotes, that as the cause was God’s, so he achieved deliverance in a manner to signalize his own name. The description is parallel to Isaiah 52:10; Isaiah 59:16; and applies, prophetically, to Christ, his resurrection, and his victory over his enemies.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-98.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Psalms 98:1. O sing unto the Lord a new song — See on Psalms 96:1. For he hath done marvellous things — The work of our redemption and salvation by Christ is a work of wonder. If we take a view of all the steps of it, from the contrivance of it before all time to the consummation of it, and its everlasting consequences when time shall be no more, we shall say, God has in it done marvellous things; it is all his doing, and it is marvellous in our eyes. His right hand, &c., hath gotten him the victory — God, by his own only power, hath overcome all difficulties and enemies, and hath, in spite of all opposition, raised Christ from the dead, and set him upon his throne, and propagated his kingdom in the world.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/psalms-98.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Himself. There is no title in Hebrew. Hence many have attributed it to Moses, with the preceding psalms. But the name of Samuel destroys this pretension, and most people suppose that David wrote it at the removal of the ark. (Calmet) --- Others refer it to the return from captivity, (Theodoret) or to the dedication of the second temple, (Calmet) and the reign of the Messias. (Berthier) --- Angry. Though many enemies rage, and the whole earth be stirred up to oppose the reign of Christ, he shall still prevail. (Challoner) (Psalm ii.) --- His will shall be done, (Worthington) for He sitteth on the Cherubim. (Haydock) --- Ferrand infers from this expression, that the psalm cannot regard the times after the captivity, as the ark existed no more. But this is not clear; and, at any rate, this idea might still be retained, as God is represented on a chariot drawn by Cherubim, Ezechiel x. 1., and Daniel iii. 55. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-98.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Title (of Psalm 98). A Psalm. Hebrew. mizmor. App-65.

O sing. Another summons to sing the New Song; but this time it is for what Jehovah has done for Israel. right hand . . . arm. Figure of speech Anthropopatheia. App-6.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-98.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

O sing unto the LORD a new song; for he hath done marvellous things: his right hand, and his holy arm, hath gotten him the victory.

Psalms 98:1-9.-Introduction. Praise Yahweh in a new song; because He has done marvels, showing before the pagan His righteousness in behalf of Israel, whereby all the earth sees His salvation (Psalms 98:1-3). This praise is to be rendered with psalms and instrumental music (Psalms 98:4-6); and this by the world's inhabitants, before Yahweh, who is coming to judge in equity (Psalms 98:7-9).

A Psalm - Mizmowr (Hebrew #4210) (cf. Psalms 3:1-8 title, note). This is the only psalm which has this word without addition. It must therefore be here not in the general sense, but the special-namely, the lyrical song accompanying the prophetic psalm, Psalms 97:1-12. Compare the Hebrew cognate forms in Psalms 98:5.

O sing unto the Lord a new song - from Psalms 96:1. The theme is the same as that of Psalms 96:1-13 and Psalms 97:1-12 - namely, the coming of the Lord to the earth as the victorious Saviour, King, and Judge. The stand-point is ideal-namely, the anticipated time of the manifested salvation and kingdom of Yahweh-Messiah, when first the "new song" will be fully appropriate.

His right hand, and his holy arm, hath gotten him the victory - (Isaiah 52:10; Isaiah 59:16; Isaiah 63:5, which have a partial realization in Messiah's first advent, and their complete realization in His second.) 'The arm of the Lord' is put in contradistinction to ordinary means, as the instrument whereby He brings perfect salvation to Zion, literal and spiritual. 'Ordinary means, although they do not derogate from the power of, God, in some measure like a veil, hide His face' (Calvin). Compare Isaiah 40:10; Isaiah 51:9. The epithet "holy" implies the awful and infinite elevation by which His power is lifted above all creature-powers.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-98.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Victory.—The word more commonly rendered “salvation,” as, indeed, in next verse.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-98.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

O sing unto the LORD a new song; for he hath done marvellous things: his right hand, and his holy arm, hath gotten him the victory.
Sing
33:3; 96:1; 149:1; Isaiah 42:10; Revelation 5:9; 14:3
for he
77:14; 86:10; 105:5; 136:4; 139:14; Exodus 15:6,11; Isaiah 43:18-20; Jeremiah 31:22; Luke 1:49; 2:10-14; Acts 2:11; Revelation 15:3,4
his right
2:5,6; 45:3-5; 110:2-6; Genesis 3:15; Exodus 15:6; Isaiah 52:10; 59:16; 63:5; John 16:33; Acts 19:20; Colossians 2:15; Hebrews 2:14,15; Revelation 3:21; 6:2; 17:14; Revelation 19:11-21

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 98:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-98.html.

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