corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 98:3

 

 

He has remembered His lovingkindness and His faithfulness to the house of Israel; All the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He hath remembered his mercy - His gracious promises to their forefathers.

And his truth - Faithfully accomplishing what he had promised. All this was fulfilled under the Gospel.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-98.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He hath remembered his mercy - Compare the notes at Luke 1:54-55 (note), Luke 1:72 (note), where this passage in the Psalms was not improbably referred to by Mary and Zacharias. The idea is, that God had called to mind his promise of mercy to his people; that he had not suffered it to pass out of his recollection; that he had kept his word.

And his truth - He has kept his promise; he has shown that he is a God of truth.

Toward the house of Israel - Toward his people.

All the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God - This appears to have been quoted from Isaiah 52:10. See the notes at that passage. The resemblance in the language is so strong as to make it probable that the psalm was composed after the times of Isaiah, and not improbably to be used (as remarked above) in the dedication of the temple after the captivity. The whole psalm would be appropriate to celebrate that deliverance; while, at the same time, like the language in Isaiah, it would be adapted to celebrate a higher deliverance - under the Messiah - of which that was an emblem.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-98.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"He hath remembered his lovingkindness and his faithfulness toward the house of Israel:

All the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God."

The psalmist, who was an Israelite, naturally stressed the marvelous things God had done on behalf of Israel. The deliverance from Egypt, the Red Sea crossing, the wilderness wonders, the pillar of cloud, the pillar of fire, the manna, and the water from the smitten rock were among those wonders; and the conquest of Canaan and the eviction of the pagan nations by the conquest - all these marvelous doings upon Israel's behalf were continually brought before the minds of the chosen people.

"All the ends of the earth have seen." Indeed, this was true. One of the constellations in the heavens was believed to represent Israel; all the nations were aware that none other than God himself had delivered Israel from Egypt, cast the pagan nations out of Canaan and settled Israel therein. Even in the times when the Saviour was born, all the kings of the earth were expecting the birth of the Mighty One.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-98.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He hath remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel,.... His mercy promised them, in raising up a Saviour to them, one that should be the glory of them; and his truth, in fulfilling that and every other promise concerning him; see Luke 1:72,

all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God; either Christ himself, who is the salvation or Saviour of God's appointing, providing, and sending; or the salvation which he has wrought out, the Gospel declaring it; which has been sent throughout the world; and many in all parts of it, even in the most distant parts of it, in the very ends of it, have been made to see the nature, want, worth, and value of it; not every individual person in the world, but some in the several parts, and in the remote corners of it, whither the Gospel has been or will be sent; see Isaiah 52:10.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-98.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He hath d remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel: all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.

(d) God was moved by no other means to gather his Church from the Jews and Gentiles, but because he would perform his promise.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-98.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The union of mercy and truth (Psalm 57:3; Psalm 85:10) secure the blessings of the promise (Genesis 12:3; Genesis 18:18) to all the world (Isaiah 52:10).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/psalms-98.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

3He hath remembered his goodness Having spoken of the general manifestation of his salvation, he now celebrates his goodness more particularly to his own chosen people. God exhibited himself as a Father to Gentiles as well as Jews; but to the Jews first, who were, so to speak, the first-born. (109) The glory of the Gentiles lay in their being adopted and in-grafted into the holy family of Abraham, and the salvation of the whole world sprung from the promise made to Abraham, as Christ said, “Salvation is of the Jews,” (John 4:22) The Psalmist therefore very properly observes, that God in redeeming the world remembered his truth, which he had given to Israel his people — language, too, which implies that he was influenced by no other motive than that of faithfully performing what he had himself promised. (110) The more clearly to show that the promise was not grounded at all on the merit or righteousness of man, he mentions the goodness of God first, and afterwards his faithfulness, which stood connected with it. The cause, in short, was not to be found out of God himself, (to use a common expression,) but in his mere good pleasure, which had been testified long before to Abraham and his posterity. The word remembered is used in accommodation to man’s apprehension; for what has been long suspended seems to have been forgotten. Upwards of two thousand years elapsed from the time of giving the promise to the appearance of Christ, and as the people of God were subjected to many afflictions and calamities, we need not wonder that they should have sighed, and given way to ominous fears regarding the fulfillment of this redemption. When it is added, all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of God, this is not merely commendatory of the greatness of the salvation, meaning that it should be so illustrious that the report of it would reach the ends of the earth; but it signifies that the nations formerly immersed in delusions and superstitions would participate in it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-98.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 98:3 He hath remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel: all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.

Ver. 3. He hath remembered his mercy, and his truth] His mercy moving him to promise, and his truth binding him to perform, 2 Samuel 7:18; 2 Samuel 7:21, and hence all our happiness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-98.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 98:3. He hath remembered his mercy That this is prophetically spoken of the redemption of mankind by Christ, appears from Luke 1:54; Luke 1:72.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-98.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He hath now actually given that mercy which he had promised to the Israelites.

All the ends of the earth; all the inhabitants of the earth, from one end to another.

Have seen, i.e. enjoyed it, as this word is oft used, as hath been proved again and again.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-98.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3. He hath remembered—That is, to fulfil and make good his promise. Here is a recognition of covenant promise and relation toward the house of Israel.

Ends of the earth—A clear anticipation of the subjection of the Gentile nations to Christ. The judgments of Jehovah, like the miracles of Egypt, of the Red Sea, and of the wilderness, in Moses’s time, should cause the distant nations to tremble and submit.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-98.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

mercy = lovingkindness, or grace.

God. Hebrew. Elohim.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-98.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He hath remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel: all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.
remembered
106:45; Leviticus 26:42; Deuteronomy 4:31; Micah 7:20; Luke 1:54,55,72; Romans 15:8,9
all the ends
2; 22:27; 67:7; Isaiah 45:22; 49:6; 52:10; Luke 2:30,31; 3:6; Acts 13:47; Acts 28:28; Romans 10:12,18; Revelation 5:9

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 98:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-98.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology