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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 98:5

 

 

Sing praises to the LORD with the lyre, With the lyre and the sound of melody.

Adam Clarke Commentary

With - the voice of a Psalm - I think זמרה zimrah, which we translate Psalm, means either a musical instrument, or a species of ode modulated by different voices.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-98.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Sing unto the Lord with the harp - A song or psalm accompanied by the harp. On the harp. See the notes at Isaiah 5:12.

And the voice of a psalm - The voice in singing; a musical voice. Let it not be mere instrumental music, but let that be accompanied with the voice uttering intelligible sounds or words. The only proper use of instrumental music in the worship of God is to deepen the impression which the words are adapted to make; to secure a better influence of truth on the heart.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-98.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"Sing praises unto Jehovah with the harp;

With the harp and the voice of melody.

With trumpets and the sound of cornet

Make a joyful noise before the King, Jehovah."

The message of these two verses is one. They are a call to bring the mechanical instruments of music into the worship of God. (For more comments on this, see my comments on this at the end of Psalms 150.)

These words, like Psalms 98:4. are addressed to "all nations." "God's covenant relationship with Israel was never intended to be exclusive (Genesis 12:3); but it was intended to be the prelude to the universal extension of his blessings."[8]


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-98.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Sing unto the Lord with the harp,.... Playing upon that at the same time: here and in the following verse is an allusion to Old Testament worship, and the manner of performing that; not that this should be done in New Testament times, only New Testament worship is expressed in Old Testament language, which is no unusual thing; hence in Gospel times, and Gospel churches, the saints, especially when singing the new song of redeeming grace, are said to have harps in their hands, expressive only of their spiritual melody in their hearts, Revelation 5:8,

with the harp, and the voice of the psalm; with the harp alone first, as Aben Ezra and Kimchi interpret it, and then with the harp, and together with the words of a psalm, sung in a psalm tune. Gospel churches are to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, Ephesians 5:19.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-98.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 98:5 Sing unto the LORD with the harp; with the harp, and the voice of a psalm.

Ver. 5. Sing unto the Lord with the harp] Tum cithararum tum vocum mutuis vicibus; do your utmost in the most superlative manner you can devise.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-98.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The worship of the New Testament is here described in phrases taken from the rites of the old, as Psalms 92:3, and oft elsewhere.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-98.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Adore his foot-stool. The ark of the covenant was called, in the Old Testament, God's foot-stool: over which he was understood to sit, on his propitiatory, or mercy-seat, as on a throne, between the wings of the Cherubim, in the sanctuary: to which the children of Israel paid a great veneration. But as this psalm evidently relates to Christ, and the New Testament, where the ark has no place, the holy Fathers understand this text of the worship paid by the Church to the body and blood of Christ in the sacred mysteries: in as much as the humanity of Christ is, as it were, the foot-stool of the divinity. So St. Ambrose, l. 3. de Spiritu Sancto, c. 12., and St. Augustine upon this psalm. (Challoner) --- The last mentioned holy Doctor inculcates the obligation of adoring Jesus Christ in the blessed Eucharist, and refutes the Capharnaites, &c., John vi. (Worthington) --- The Jews adored God, shewing a relative honour, by prostrating themselves before the ark, in the same manner as Catholics do before holy images. (Berthier) --- It is. Septuagint and some psalters, "he is holy." (Calmet) --- Hebrew is ambiguous. (Berthier) --- "I discover how I may adore the foot-stool,...without impiety. Christ took flesh of Mary,...and give it us to eat for our salvation. But none eats that flesh, till he have first adored it." (St. Augustine)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-98.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

a psalm = sing praise (Hebrew. zimrah), at end of Psalms 98:4 and Psalms 98:5, by Figure of speech Anadiplosis. App-6.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-98.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Sing . . .—Rather, Play to Jehovah on a harp. on a harp, and with melodious sound of music.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-98.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Sing unto the LORD with the harp; with the harp, and the voice of a psalm.
33:2; 92:3,4; 1 Chronicles 15:16; 25:1-6; 2 Chronicles 29:25; Revelation 5:8; 14:2,3

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 98:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-98.html.

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