corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 1:10

 

 

always in my prayers making request, if perhaps now at last by the will of God I may succeed in coming to you.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Making request, etc. - By this we see how earnestly the apostle longed to see Rome. It had long been a subject of continual prayer to God, that he might have a prosperous journey to, or rather meeting with, them, for so we should understand the word ευοδωθησμαι· that he had a prosperous meeting with them we cannot doubt; that he had a disastrous journey to them the 27th of the Acts fully proves.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Making request - It was his earnest desire to see them, and he presented the subject before God.

If by any means - This shows the earnest desire which he had to see them, and implies that be had designed it, and had been hindered; see Romans 1:13.

Now at length - He had purposed it a long time, but had been hindered. He doubtless cherished this purpose for years. The expressions in the Greek imply an earnest wish that this long-cherished purpose might be accomplished before long.

A prosperous journey - A safe, pleasant journey. It is right to regard all success in traveling as depending on God, and to pray for success and safety from danger. Yet all such prayers are not answered according to the letter of the petition. The prayer of Paul that be might see the Romans was granted, but in a remarkable way. He was persecuted by the Jews, and arraigned before King Agrippa. He appealed to the Roman emperor, and was taken there in chains as a prisoner. Yet the journey might in this way have a more deep effect on the Romans, than if he had gone in any other way. In so mysterious a manner does God often hear the prayers of his people; and though their prayers are answered, yet it is in his own time and way; see the last chapters of the Acts.

By the will of God - If God shall grant it; if God will by his mercy grant me the great favor of my coming to you. This is a proper model of a prayer; and is in accordance with the direction of the Bible; see James 4:14-15.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/romans-1.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Making request, if by any means now at length,.... A principal thing, which be incessantly and importunately requested at the throne of grace, was, that he might have an opportunity of coming to them; that God in his providence would open a way for him; and that he might have a safe and comfortable journey in a very little time; all which he submits to the will of God, as a good man ought to do; and which he thus expresses,

I might have a prosperous journey by the will of God, to come unto you; see James 4:13.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Making request, if by any means now at length I may have a prosperous journey by the will of God, to come to you — Though long anxious to visit the capital, he met with a number of providential hindrances (Romans 1:13; Romans 15:22; and see on Acts 19:21; see on Acts 23:11; see on Acts 28:15); insomuch that nearly a quarter of a century elapsed, after his conversion, ere his desire was accomplished, and that only as “a prisoner of Jesus Christ.” Thus taught that his whole future was in the hands of God, he makes it his continual prayer that at length the obstacles to a happy and prosperous meeting might be removed.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

If by any means now at length (ει πως ηδη ποτεei pōs ēdē pote). A condition of the first class in the form of an indirect question (aim) or elliptical condition like Acts 27:12 (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1024). Note the four particles together to express Paul‘s feelings of emotion that now at length somehow it may really come true.

I may be prospered (ευοδωτησομαιeuodōthēsomai). First future passive indicative of ευοδοωeuodoō for which verb see note on 1 Corinthians 16:2.

By the will of God (εν τωι τεληματι του τεουen tōi thelēmati tou theou). Paul‘s way lay “in” God‘s will.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

I might have a prosperous journey ( εὐοδωθήσομαι )

Rev., I may be prospered. The A.V. brings out the etymological force of the word. See on 3 John 1:2.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Making request, if by any means now at length I might have a prosperous journey by the will of God to come unto you.

Always — In all my solemn addresses to God.

If by any means now at length — This accumulation of particles declares the strength of his desire.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/romans-1.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Now at length. Paul was, at this time, about proceeding to Jerusalem, intending immediately afterwards to visit Rome. (Acts 19:21.)--A prosperous journey. The journey of the apostle to Rome actually proved to be very far from a prosperous one, in the ordinary sense of the term. The passage was as unpropitious as inclement skies, stormy seas, shipwreck, and long delays, could make it. Still, in respect to the promotion of the great object which he had in view, it was perhaps the most propitious expedition ever made. Those very circumstances of exposure and suffering have given to the voyage of St. Paul, and to the moral and spiritual lessons which the history of it conveys, an importance and an influence which far surpass, undoubtedly, the highest expectations he could have formed. We ought to learn, from this case, that, after offering our prayer to God, in respect to what is to befall us, we should leave the disposal of the event entirely to him, with a quiet and contented confidence that he will do all things well.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/romans-1.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.Requesting, if by any means, etc. As it is not probable that we from the heart study his benefit, whom we are not ready to assist by our labors, he now adds, after having said that he was anxious for their welfare, that he showed by another proof his love to them, as before God, even by requesting that he might be able to advance their interest. That you may, therefore, perceive the full meaning, read the words as though the word also were inserted, requesting also, if by any means, etc. By saying, A prosperous journey by the will of God he shows, not only that he looked to the Lord’s favor for success in his journey, but that he deemed his journey prosperous, if it was approved by the Lord. According to this model ought all our wishes to be formed.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/romans-1.html. 1840-57.

Vv. 10. With the thanksgiving there is connected, as a second matter which he has to communicate to them, his not less unwearied prayer that he might be able soon to visit them. The words: always in my prayers, refer certainly to the following participle: making request, and not to what precedes, a sense which would lead to a pleonasm. Not one of the intimate dealings of the apostle with his God, in which this subject does not find a place.— ᾿επί, strictly speaking, on occasion of. The conjunction εἴπως, if perhaps, indicates the calculation of chances; and the adverbs now, at length, the sort of impatience which he puts into his calculation. The term εὐοδοῦν strictly signifies: to cause one to journey prosperously, whence in general: to make one succeed in a business; comp. 1 Corinthians 16:2. As in this context the subject in question is precisely the success of a journey, it is difficult not to see in the choice of the term an allusion to its strict meaning: "if at length I shall not be guided prosperously in my journey to you." By whom? The words: by the will of God, tell us; favorable circumstances are the work of that all-powerful hand. Romans 1:11-12 indicate the most immediate motive of this ardent desire.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/romans-1.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 Making request, if by any means now at length I might have a prosperous journey by the will of God to come unto you.

Ver. 10. I might have a prosperous journey] This he prayed, and this he had by such a way as he little dreamed of. Little thought Paul, that when he was bound at Jerusalem, and posted from one prison to another, that God was now sending him to Rome; yet he sent him, and very safe with a great convoy. God goes often another way to work for our good than we could imagine.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-1.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

10. εἴ πως] if by any means. No subject of δεόμενος is expressed, but it is left to be gathered from this clause, as in Simon’s entreaty, Acts 8:24, δεήθητε ὑμεῖς ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ.… ὅπως μηδὲν ἐπέλθῃ ἐπʼ ἐμὲ ὧν εἰρήκατε, where ὅπως κ. τ. λ. is not the contents of the prayer, but the end aimed at by it.

ἤδη ποτέ] before long:—lit., ‘at last, some day or other.’

εὐοδωθήσομαι] I shall be allowed, prospered: see reff., and Deuteronomy 28:29; and cf. Umbreit’s note. The rendering, ‘I might have a prosperous journey’ (Vulg. and E.V.), is etymologically incorrect; the passive of ὁδόω, ‘to shew the way,’ ‘to bring into the way,’ must be ‘to be shewn the way,’ or ‘brought into the way.’ So Herod. vi. 73, ὡς τῷ κλεομενεϊ εὐωδώθη τὸ ἐς τὸν δημάρητον πρῆγμα.

ἐν τῷ θελ. τοῦ θεοῦ] In the course of,—by, the will of God. ἐλθεῖν belongs to εὐοδωθήσομαι, not to δεόμενος.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 1:10. πάντοτεδεόμενος] annexes to ὡς ἀδιαλ. the more precise definition: in that (so that) I always (each time) in my prayers request. ἐπί, which is to be referred to the idea of definition of time (Bernhardy p. 246), indicates the form of action which takes place. Comp 1 Thessalonians 1:2; Ephesians 1:16; Philemon 1:4; Winer, p. 352 [E. T. 470].

εἴπως ἤδη ποτέ] if perhaps at length on some occasion. For examples of ἥδη, already (Baeumlein, Part. p. 138 ff.), which, comparing another time with the present, conveys by the reference to something long hoped for but delayed the idea at length, see Hartung, Partikel. I. p. 238; Klotz, a(359) Devar. p. 607; comp Philippians 4:10, and the passages in Kypke. Th. Schott incorrectly renders πάντοτε, under all circumstances, which it never means, and ἥδη πότε as if it were ἤδη νῦν or ἄρτι. The mode of expression by εἴπως implies somewhat of modest fear, arising from the thought of possible hindrances.(361)

εὐοδωθήσομαι] I shall have the good fortune. The active εὐοδοῦν is seldom used in its proper signification, to lead well, expeditum iter praebere, as in Soph. O. C. 1437; Theophr. de caus. pl. v. 6, 7; LXX. Genesis 24:27; Genesis 24:48; the passive, however, never means via recta incedere, expeditum iter habere, but invariably (even in Proverbs 17:8) metaphorically: prospero successu gaudere. See Herod. vi. 73; 1 Corinthians 16:2; 3 John 1:2; LXX. 2 Chronicles 13:12; Psalms 1:3, and frequently; Sirach 11:16; Sirach 41:1; Tobit 4:19; Tobit 5:16; Test. XII. Patr. p. 684. Therefore the explanation of a prosperous journey, which besides amounts only to an accessory modal idea (Beza, Estius, Wolf, and many others following the Vulgate and Oecumenius; including van Hengel and Hofmann), must be rejected, and not combined with ours (Umbreit).

ἐν τῷ θελ. τ. θεοῦ] in virtue of the will of God; on this will the ευοδωθ. causally depend.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/romans-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Romans 1:10. ἔιπως ἤδη ποτέ, The accumulation of the particles intimates the strength of the desire.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Making request; this was one thing he requested of God, that what he had long desired and designed might happily (if it seemed good in God’s sight) be at last accomplished, that he might come in person to them. This desire of Paul to see the Romans might be one cause of that appeal which he made to Rome, Acts 25:10,11,

By the will of God; he adds this, because, in publishing the gospel, he followed the order which God, by his Spirit, prescribed him: see Acts 16:7,9,10.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 1:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

To come unto you; for the apostle had not yet been in Rome.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Family Bible New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/romans-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

10. ἐπὶ, at. δεόμενος εἴ πως. Cf. Acts 8:22; cf. Blass, p. 216. ἤδη ποτὲ, at long last.

εὐοδωθήσομαι, “in passive always tropical; to prosper, be successful,” Thayer; 1 Corinthians 16:2; 3 John 1:2; but cf. Sept., Judges 18:5; Tobit 5:21; Tobit 11:5; so S. H. adopt early English vv., “I have a spedi way.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-1.html. 1896.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

10. “Supplicating, if possible indeed at some time I shall be pleased in the will of God to come unto you.” Paul had been preaching twenty eight years when he wrote this letter, all the time desiring and praying that it might be his glorious privilege, in the will of God, to visit the world’s metropolis and there preach the gospel in the capital of all the nations beneath the skies.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-1.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Making request, if by any means now at length I may at some time be prospered by the will of God to come to you.’

And his continuing request to God is with a view to at last being able to visit them ‘by any means’. It is quite clear that he has a real sense of the urgent need that there is for him to assist the Roman church. He is, however, also aware that it is not going to be easy for him to fit it in. He has much to do. ‘Now at length -- at some time’ (ede pote) brings this out.

‘By the will of God.’ He assures them that he does nothing of his own will. He is only concerned for the will of God. His future is heavily committed into God’s hands, and he recognises that God’s will may not be the same as his own. Compare James 4:13-15. So he is submissive to the will of God. He recognises that God might step in and alter his plans.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/romans-1.html. 2013.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

Making request, if by any means now at length I might have a prosperous journey, by the will of God, to come unto you.

Making request. — Paul’s affection for those to whom he wrote impelled him, not once or twice with a passing wish, but at all times, to desire to be present with them, notwithstanding the inconveniences of so long and perilous a journey. He asks of God that by some means now at length he might be permitted to visit them. Thus Christian love searches out new objects on which to exercise itself, and extends itself even to those who are personally unknown. I might have a prosperous journey, by the will of God. — This teaches us that God, by His providence, regulates all that takes place. There is nothing with which Christians should be more habitually impressed, than that God is the disposer of all events. They should look to His will in the smallest concerns of life, as well as in affairs of the greatest moment. Even a prosperous journey is from the Lord. In this way they glorify God by acknowledging His providence in all things, and have the greatest confidence and happiness in walking before Him. Here we also learn that, while the will of God concerning any event is not ascertained, we have liberty to desire and pray for what we wish, provided our prayers and desires are conformed to His holiness. But will our prayers be agreeable to God if they be contrary to His decrees? Yes, provided they be offered in submission to Him, and not opposed to any known command; for it is the revealed, and not the secret will of God that must be the rule of our prayers. We also learn in this place, that since all events depend on the will of God, we ought to acquiesce in them, however contrary they may be to our wishes; and likewise, that in those things in which the will of God is not apparent, we should always accompany our prayers and our desires with this condition, if it be pleasing to God, and be ready to renounce our desires as soon as they appear not to be conformed to His will. ‘O how sweet a thing,’ as one has well observed, ‘were it for us to learn to make our burdens light, by framing our hearts to the burden, and making our Lord’s will a law!’


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-1.html. 1835.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. Request—His prayers for them were twofold: for their spiritual prosperity, and for divine permission to visit them.

Prosperous journey—He journeyed to Rome at last, but by what few would call a prosperous trip. (Acts 28.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/romans-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 1:10. Making request. How unceasingly he remembers them is evident from this constant petition, the purport of which is next expressed.

If haply, etc. Instead of saying, ‘that I may come,’ the Apostle uses this conditional form, which indicates both his earnest desire and his submission of it to God’s will.

How at last, on some occasion. This implies both earnest wish and long delay (both of which are expressed in Romans 1:13), and also the possibility that he might be delayed much longer. Three years intervened before his desire was granted.

I may be prospered. The E. V. here follows the incorrect trans-ion of the Vulgate. The word means to succeed, to have the good fortune; the idea of journeying, which belonged to it originally, was lost in the usage of that time.

By the will of God. This belongs to ‘prospered,’ not to ‘come.’ Romans 1:11.

For I long to see you. This longing was the reason of his constant petition. There is no needless repetition, since this verse and what follows show that thanksgiving, remembrance, petition, and longing, all grow out of his desire to preach that gospel, which he is about to set forth in this Epistle.

Some spiritual gift. ‘Spiritual’ means, wrought by the Holy Spirit, and not simply, belonging to the inner lift. Apparently, Paul never uses the word in the latter sense. ‘Gift’ does not refer to miraculous gifts, but to all gifts of grace. ‘Some,’ expresses ‘not only the Apostle’s modesty, but an acknowledgment that the Romans were already in the faith, together with an intimation that something was still wanting in them.’ (Lange.)

To the end, etc. This was the object of the desired impartation of spiritual gifts; they were not desired for their own sake.

Be established, or, ‘strengthened.’ The agent would be the Holy Spirit (comp. ‘spiritual’); Paul was but the instrument (see next verse).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-1.html. 1879-90.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Romans 1:10 making request, if by any means now at length I may be prospered by the will of God to come unto you.

"God is my witness"-he is not making a light statement, he is dead serious. Another indication that the Church in Rome had existed for some time and that Paul had been aware of their activity.

"Whom I serve in my spirit"-"to whom I offer the humble service of my spirit" (NEB) Paul"s heart was in the work that God had given him to do.

Some in Rome may have been trying to discredit Paul by telling the brethren that Paul"s oft-repeated promises to come were never intended to be fulfilled. He reminds them that his travel plans were subject to the will of God. The prayers of Paul went beyond his immediate circle of close friends.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/romans-1.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Making request. Greek. deomai. App-134.

if by any means. Greek. eipos. App-118.

might . . . journey. Greek. euodoumai. Elsewhere, 1 Corinthians 16:2. 3 John 1:2.

will. Greek. thelema. App-102.

come. Greek. erchomai. App-106.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Making request if by any means now at length I might have a prosperous journey by the will of God to Making request, if by any means now at length I might have a prosperous journey by the will of God to come unto you.

Making request ... According to what is probably the most ancient division of these verses-adopted in nearly every version but our own, and by every critic-they should read thus: Romans 1:9. For God is my witness ... how unceasingly I make mention (or remembrance) of you; Romans 1:10. Always in my prayers making request,' etc. When one puts alongside of this the similar language used to the Ephesians (Ephesians 1:15-16), the Philippians (Philippians 1:3-4), the Colossians (Colossians 1:3-4), and the Thessalonians (1 Thessalonians 1:2-3) - what universal love, what all-absorbing spirituality, what impassioned devotion to the glory of Christ, what incessant transaction with Heaven about the minutest affairs of the kingdom of Christ upon earth, are thus seen to meet in this wonderful man!

(If by any means now at length I might have a prosperous journey , [ euodootheesomai (Greek #2137)] - rather, 'I may have a way opened,'

By the will of God) to come unto you. Though long anxious to visit the capital, he met with a number of providential hindrances (Romans 1:13; Rom. 25:22; Acts 19:21; Acts 23:11; Acts 28:15 ); insomuch that nearly a quarter of a century elapsed, after his conversion, before his desire was accomplished, and that only as "a prisoner of Jesus Christ." Thus taught that his whole future was in the hands of God, he makes it his continual prayer that at length the obstacles to a happy and prosperous meeting might be removed.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) If by any means now at length.—Note this accumulation of particles, denoting the earnestness of his desire. “All this time I have been longing to come to you, and now at last I hope that it may be put in my power.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Making request, if by any means now at length I might have a prosperous journey by the will of God to come unto you.
request
15:22-24,30-32; Philippians 4:6; 1 Thessalonians 2:18; 3:10,11; Philemon 1:22; Hebrews 13:19
a prosperous
Acts 19:21; 27:1-28
by the will
Acts 18:21; 21:14; 1 Corinthians 4:19; James 4:15

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-1.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

I make mention of you, always in my prayers praying ( εἴ πως) if possibly, if it may be, expressing the submission to the will of God with which the apostle urged his request. ἤδη ποτέ, now at last, as though he had long looked forward with desire to what there was now a prospect of his seeing accomplished. I may be so happy, by the will of God, to come to you. εὐοδοῦν is, to lead in the right way, to prosper one's journey, Genesis 24:48, and figuratively, to prosper, 1 Corinthians 16:2; 3 John 1:2. In the passive voice, it is, to be prospered, successful, favored. In the present case, as Paul had neither commenced his journey, nor formed any immediate purpose to undertake it, see Romans 15:25-29, his prayer was not that his journey might be prosperous, but that he might be permitted to undertake it; that his circumstances should be so favorably ordered that he might be able to execute his long cherished purpose of visiting Rome. Knowing, however, that all things are ordered of God, and feeling that his own wishes should be subordinated to the Divine will, he adds, by the will of God; which is equivalent to, If it be the will of God. ‘Praying continually, that, if it be the will of God, I may be prospered to come unto you.'


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 1:10". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-1.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology