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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 1:15

 

 

So, for my part, I am eager to preach the gospel to you also who are in Rome.

Adam Clarke Commentary

I am ready to preach - προθυμον ; I have a ready mind. I was only prevented by the providence of God from visiting you long ago. His time is best: in the mean time I write, by his direction, to comfort and instruct you.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-1.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you also that are in Rome.

Students of the Greek language are amazed to find that a single word in that language is translated "preach the gospel"; but Macknight's explanation fully justifies it:

The original word was first used by the LXX to signify the publishing of any good news: and, having inserted it in their translation of Isaiah 60:6; 61:1, where Messiah's preaching good tidings to the poor is foretold (Luke 4:21), the apostles justly appropriated it to the preaching of the gospel, as the best news mankind could hear.[21]

This verse also supports the conclusion that Romans was addressed to all the inhabitants in Rome, and not merely to believers alone, but to Barbarians, foolish, and, in short, all people. The tremendous motivation of Paul's life appears in the twin declarations, "I am debtor" (Romans 1:14) and "I am ready" (Romans 1:15).

With this solid shot, Paul dispelled any notion that he had been holding back from a trip to Rome due to any considerations like being ashamed to preach there. Having already affirmed the credentials of his apostolic calling, he waived all privileges of rank and all the honors of such an office and presented himself in this verse to the total population of that great city, not merely as the great ambassador, which he surely was, but also as a human brother, a fellow-Christian who had long loved them, prayed for them, and longed to visit them. Choosing exactly the right words, Paul in this perfect introduction presented himself as one who actually considered himself in debt to the whole community, indeed to all people, and as a brother in Christ who was eager to preach to them. How tender and beautiful are the sentiments expressed upon this sacred page! As Beet put it,

Our spirits bowed before one who stood so high in the service of so great a Master. But now the Ambassador of Christ comes to us like one of ourselves. Across the waters which roll between him and us, we hear a brother's voice, and see a brother's face.[22]

[21] James Macknight, op. cit., p. 57.

[22] J. A. Beet, St. Paul's Epistles to the Romans, p. 47.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/romans-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

So, as much as in me is, I am ready,.... This explains what he was a debtor to one and another for, namely,

to preach the Gospel; expresses the readiness of his mind to that work, whatever difficulties lay in his way; and declares what a willing mind he had to preach it also to the Romans, as elsewhere:

to you that are at Rome also; the metropolis of the Roman empire, a very public place, the seat of Satan, and where was the heat of persecution.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at u Rome also.

(u) He means all those who dwell at Rome, though some of them were not Romans; see the end of the epistle.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/romans-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also — He feels himself under an all-subduing obligation to carry the gospel to all classes of mankind, as adapted to and ordained equally for all (1 Corinthians 9:16).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

So as much as in me is I am ready (ουτω το κατ εμε προτυμονhoutō to kat' eme prothumon). Literally, “Thus the according to me affair is ready” (προτυμοςprothumos old adjective, προ τυμοςproεχ υμωνthumos). It is an awkward idiom like to τα κατ εμεex humōn in Romans 12:18. The plural ta kat' eme we find in Philemon 1:12; Colossians 4:7; Ephesians 6:21.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

To you also that are in Rome

To you refers to the christian Church, not to the population generally. In every verse, from Romans 1:6to Romans 1:13, ὑμεῖς yourefers to the Church.


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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

As much as in me is; so far as I have power and opportunity.


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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/romans-1.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

15.I am therefore ready, (37) etc. He concludes what he had before said of his desire — that as he knew it to be his duty to spread the gospel among them, in order to gather fruit for the Lord, he was anxious to fulfill God’s calling, as far as he was allowed to do so by the Lord.


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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/romans-1.html. 1840-57.

Vv. 15. "So, as much as in me is, I have the lively desire to preach the gospel to you also, to you that are at Rome."

Of the three explanations by which it has been sought to account for the grammatical construction of this verse, the simplest seems to me to be that which gives a restricting sense to the words κατ᾿ ἐμέ: for my part, that is to say: "so far as depends on me, so far as external circumstances shall not thwart my desire," and which takes τὸ πρόθυμον as a paraphrase of the substantive προθυμία; the meaning is: "So far as I am concerned, the liveliest desire prevails in me to"...Such is the explanation of Fritzsche, Reiche, Philippi. De Wette and Meyer prefer to join τό with κατ᾿ ἐμέ in the same sense as we have just given to κατ᾿ ἐμέ alone, and to take πρόθυμον as the subject: "As far as I am concerned, there is an eagerness to"...Some have made τὸ κατ᾿ ἐμέ a periphrasis for ἐγώ, as the subject of the proposition, and taken πρόθυμον as a predicate: "My personal disposition is eagerness to announce to you"...The meaning is nearly the same whichever of the three explanations be adopted. The οὕτω, so, very obviously stands as a concluding particle. This eagerness to preach at Rome no less than elsewhere is the consequence of that debt to all which he feels lying upon him. The meaning: likewise, would not be so suitable. The word to evangelize, literally, to proclaim good news, seems to be inapplicable to a church already founded. But we have just seen that the apostle has here in view the extension of the church by preaching to the unbelieving population around it. Hence the use of the word. We must therefore take the words: you that are at Rome, in a wider sense. It is not merely the members of the church who are denoted by it, but the whole population of the great city represented in the eyes of Paul by his readers. As Hofmann says: "He is here considering the members of the church as Romans, not as Christians." The words at Rome are omitted by Codex G, as in Romans 1:7. Volkmar explains their rejection by the fact that some evangelistarium (a collection of the pericopes intended for public reading) suppressed them to preserve the universal character of our Epistle. This explanation comes to the same as that which we have given on Romans 1:7.

Here for the present the letter closes and the treatise begins. The first proposition of Romans 1:16 : I am not ashamed of the gospel, is the transition from the one to the other. For the words: I am not ashamed, are intended to remove a suspicion which might be raised against the profession Paul has just made of eagerness to preach at Rome; they thus belong to the letter. And, on the other hand, the word gospel sums up the whole contents of the didactic treatise which immediately opens. It is impossible to see in this first proposition of Romans 1:16 anything else than a transition, or to bring out of it, as Hofmann attempts, the statement of the object of the whole Epistle.


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Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/romans-1.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

15 So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also.

Ver. 15. So as much] Quicquid in me situm est, promptum est. A notable expression.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Romans 1:15. I am ready, &c.— The Greek word προθυμος not only expresses readiness, but in some cases an eagerness of desire. "I am ready and desirous to preach the Gospel even at Rome, though it be the capital of the world, a place of the greater politeness and grandeur, and a place where it might seem peculiarly dangerous to oppose those popular superstitions to which the empire is supposed to owe its greatness and felicity: yet still, at all events, I am willing, I am anxious to come and publish this divine message among you, though it should be at the expence of my reputation, my liberty, or life." See Doddridge and Raphelius.


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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/romans-1.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

15. οὕτως] “Est quasi … illatio a toto ad partem insignem.” Bengel. ‘As to all Gentiles, so to you, who hold no mean place among them.’


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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-1.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Romans 1:15. οὕτω, so), therefore. It is a sort of epiphonema [exclamation, which follows a train of reasoning], and a conclusion drawn from the whole to an important part.— τὸ κατʼ ἐμὲ), that is, so far as depends on me, or I for my part, so far as I am not prevented; so Ezra 6:11, καὶ οἶκος ατο͂ υ τὸ κατʼ ἐμὲ ποιηθήσεται, and his house, so far as it depends upon me, shall be made [a dunghill].— πξόθυμον, ready) supply there is [readiness in me; I am ready]. 3 Maccabees 5:23, (26.)— τὸ προθυμοι τοῦ βασιλέως ἐν ἑτοίμῳ κεῖσθαι, [the readiness of the king to continue in a state of preparation]— ἐν ῥώμῃ, at Rome), to the wise.—Comp. the preceding verse; to the powerful.—Comp. the following verse and 1 Corinthians 1:24; therefore the following expression, at Rome, is emphatically repeated.—(See Romans 1:7.) Rome, the capital and theatre of the whole world— εὐαγγελίσασθαι, to preach the Gospel) The Statement of the Subject of the epistle is secretly implied here; I will write, what I would wish to have spoken in your presence concerning the Gospel.


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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

q.d. I have preached it at Antioch, at Athens, at Ephesus, at Corinth, &c.; and I: am ready (if God permit) to preach it in the most splendid city of Rome likewise. So the reason is not in myself, or in my own will, why I have not come to you all this while.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 1:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-1.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

15. τὸ κατ' ἐμὲ, subject to πρόθυμον, sc. ἐστιν. So far as I have to do with the matter—ref. to ἐκωλύθην, Romans 1:13; cf. τὰ κατ' ἐμὲ, Philippians 1:12.


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"Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-1.html. 1896.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

15. “Thus, according to my ability, I am ready to preach the gospel even unto you who are in Rome.” The Spirit of the Lord was then profoundly impressing Paul that his long-anticipated visit to Rome was not only a verity, but soon to be realized. Hence it was only three years from the date of this writing till, to the infinite delight of his heart, he entered the world’s emporium, “in the fullness of the blessing of Christ.”


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Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-1.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you also who are in Rome.’

And it was this great burden of indebtedness that made him ready, and even eager, to proclaim the Good News to those who were at the heart of the empire in Rome. This was, however, subject to divine permission. He would not put his own desires before the will of God. He would eventually receive that permission, but it would be in a way that was totally unexpected (Acts 23:11).


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/romans-1.html. 2013.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

So,as much as in me, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also.

Paul was always zealous to do his duty; at the same time, he always acknowledged his dependence on God. This is an example which Christians ought to imitate on all occasions, never to deviate from the path of duty, but to leave events in the hands of God. The contrary of this is generally the case. Christians are often more anxious and perplexed about their success, than with respect to their duty. They forget what regards themselves, and wish to meddle with what does not belong to them but to God. To you also. — He does not inquire or decide whether they ought to be reckoned among the Barbarians or the Greeks, the wise or unwise; he was ready to preach the Gospel to them all.

Here terminates the preface to the Epistle. The first five verses include the general introduction, the last ten embrace the particular address to those to whom it is written. The introduction contains the name, the character, and the office of the writer; his vindication of the Gospel against the cavils of the Jews, proving that it was not a novel doctrine, and that the Apostles were not opposed to the Prophets. It authenticates the whole of the Jewish canon, and attests its inspiration. It undermines the errors of the Jews respecting tradition, and directs them to the Scriptures alone. It next announces the Messiah as the subject of the Gospel, — His glorious person as God and man, His birth and resurrection, His abasement and exaltation, and His almighty power. It finally asserts the communication of grace to the Apostle, his appointment to the office he sustained, the purpose for which it was conferred, along with a commission, of which he states the grounds, to all the nations under heaven. Where else shall be found so much matter compressed in so little space? where so much brevity connected with so much fullness?

In the latter part, in which Paul addresses those to whom his Epistle was directed, he introduces many things well calculated to rivet their attention and engage their affections, while at the same time he conveys very grave and salutary instructions. What must have been the feelings of the Roman converts, when they saw the intense interest with which they were regarded by this great Apostle; when they considered the grandeur and value of the Gospel, to which he was about to call their attention in his Epistle; and when they were cheered by the hope of shortly seeing in the midst of them one whose heart glowed with such love to God, and such benevolence to them! All this must have tended to produce a reciprocal regard and reverential feeling towards the Apostle, an ardent desire to profit by his instructions, together with much gratitude to God, and many prayers to hasten his voyage to come among them. Paul did arrive at Rome, but, in the providence of God, in a very different manner, and in circumstances very different, from what he appears to have expected when he prayed for ‘a prosperous journey.’ He went there a prisoner in bonds, was shipwrecked on his voyage, and kept in confinement after his arrival.

But although he was bound, the word of God was not bound; and all fell out, in the adorable providence of God, for the furtherance of the Gospel.

The circumstances, however, in which he was placed were not in the meantime joyous, but grievous. Yet now that he stands before the throne, now that he has received the crown of righteousness, and is numbered among the spirits of just men made perfect, what regret can he experience that, during the few and evil days he spent on earth, he was conducted to Rome through persecutions, imprisonments, storms, and shipwreck, an outcast among men, but approved and accepted of God?


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Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-1.html. 1835.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 1:15. So, in accordance with this position of debtor (Romans 1:14). Other explanations are less satisfactory.

As much as in me is, or,’ as far as in me lies.’ The phrase is a strong one, as if to say: ‘As far as it depends on me, I am anxious to come and preach to you, but my will is subject to the will of God, who may have decreed it otherwise;’ comp. Romans 1:10; Romans 1:13.

I am ready. This is a correct paraphrase of a difficult Greek expression.

To preach the gospel. One word in the original, to evangelize.

To you also that are in Rome. The Christians in Rome are meant here, as throughout. The gospel, which they had already heard from others, he was ready to preach to them, that he might have fruit among them also (Romans 1:13). To refer it to unconverted Romans is incorrect, both because of the use of ‘you’ in what precedes, and because his readiness to preach this gospel to those who had already received it is the warrant for writing it to believers. Emphasis rests upon ‘you also in Rome.’ It was the capital of the world; even there he would not be ‘ashamed of the gospel’ (Romans 1:16). ‘Paul subsequently attained the object of his wishes, though not according to human purposes, but according to the counsel of God: first as a prisoner, and last as a martyr’ (Lange). The very same power is required to make men missionaries as to make them martyrs.


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-1.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

. Paul was even anxious to go and deliver the word to the Romans. Hence Mat. Polus, in his reflections on this verse, puts the following words into the mouth of the Apostle: Lucifuga non sum: ostendi id Antiochiæ, Athenis, Ephesi et Corinthi: paratus sum & in illa splendidissima urbe Roma ostendere.


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/romans-1.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Romans 1:15 So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you also that are in Rome.

"As much as in me is"-he was eager to the limits of his capacity. One writer said, "I fear we dabble a lot; I fear we play at being Christ"s"

Paul simply required of others, what he himself practiced ()

"I am ready" -how long have we been studying and are we ready yet? (Hebrews 5:11-12; 1 Peter 3:15)

CONCERNING THE GOSPEL-


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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/romans-1.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

as much as in me is = as for (Greek. kata. App-104.) me.

ready. Greek. prothumos. Only here. Matthew 26:41. Mark 14:38.

preach the gospel. Greek. euangelizo. App-121.

you, &c. = you also that are at (Greek. en) Rome.


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also.

So, as much as in me is, I am ready [ to (Greek #3588) kat (Greek #2596) eme (Greek #1691) prothumon (Greek #4289) - probably = esti (Greek #2076) hee (Greek #3588) prothumia (Greek #4288)]

To preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also. An all-subduing sense of obligation to carry the Gospel to men of every class, from the rudest to the most refined, drew him with a yearning desire to the great capital.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Accordingly, so far as depends upon his own will, and not upon the external ruling of events by God, the Apostle is ready to preach the gospel, as to the other Gentiles, so also at Rome.

So, as much as in me is.—There are three ways of taking this sentence, though the meaning remains in any case the same:—(1) “I (literally, that which concerns me) am ready.” But it is doubtful whether this is sanctioned by Greek usage. (2) Still keeping the two phrases separate, “As far as concerns me (there is) readiness.” (3) Combining them, “The readiness or inclination on my part (literally, The on-my-part readiness or inclination) is,” &c. Perhaps of these three the last, which looks the most unnatural in English, is the most natural in the Greek.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also.
so
12:18; 1 Kings 8:18; Mark 14:8; 2 Corinthians 8:12
I
Isaiah 6:8; Matthew 9:38; John 4:34; Acts 21:13; 1 Corinthians 9:17; 2 Corinthians 10:15,16

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-1.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

And so, or hence. That is, since I am bound to all men, Greeks and barbarians, I am ready to preach to you who are at Rome. The clause, τὸ κατ ̓ ἐμε πρόθυμον, admits of different interpretations. According to the English version, τὸ κατ ̓ ἐμέ must be taken together; πρόθυμον is taken as a substantive, and made the nominative to ἐστί. Hence, as much as is in me, (or, as far as I am concerned), there is a readiness, i.e. I am ready. Thus Calvin, "Itaque, quantum in me est, paratus sum." This gives a good sense, and is specially suited to the context, as it renders prominent Paul's dependence and submission. He did not direct his own steps. As far as he was concerned, he was willing to preach in Rome; but whether he should do so or not, rested not with him, but with God. A second explanation makes τὸ κατ ̓ ἐμέ the subject of the sentence, and pro&qumon the predicate. ‘What is in me is ready.' Thus Beza, "Quicquid in me situm est, id promptum est." Or, as Beza also proposes, τὁ κατ ̓ ἐμέ may be taken as a periphrase for ἐγώ, and the clause be translated, "Promptus sum ego." But it is denied that such a periphrase for the personal pronoun ever occurs; τὰ ὑμέτερα for ὑμεῖς, and τὰ ἐμά for ἐγώ, to which Beza refers, are not parallel. The third explanation, refers τό to πρόθυμον, and makes κατ ̓ ἐμέ equal to ἐμοῦ, ‘My readiness, or desire is." Comp. Ephesians 1:15, τὴν καθ ̓ ὑμᾶς πίστιν, your faith; Acts 17:28, τῶν καθ ̓ ὑμᾶς ποιητῶν, Acts 18:15, νόμου τοῦ καθ ὑμᾶς. To preach the gospel. The verb εὐαγγελίσασθαι is commonly followed by some word or phrase expressing the subject of the message — kingdom of God, gospel, word of God, Christ. In writing to Christians, who knew what the glad tidings were, the apostles often, as in the present case, use the word absolutely so that the word by itself means to preach the gospel, etc. See Romans 15:20; Acts 14:7; Galatians 4:13.


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Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-1.html.

Paul's yieldedness ( Romans 1:15)

Romans 1:15. Thus, for my part, I am eager to preach the gospel to you also who are in Rome.

There is an inference here that Paul is answering his critics who don't think he is qualified to go to Rome. It's all right for him to go to out-of-the-way places to preach the Gospel or to colonies like Philippi or Ephesus or Corinth; but to come to the great metropolis of Rome where the sinners are, where Caesar is—and the heart and pulse of the empire—why . . . .

Paul says, "That's where I want to be, right in the very center of the empire. I'm not ashamed of the Gospel. I want to bring it to you. I want fruit among you even as among other Gentiles." You can just see the passion of this man's heart.

May God give you and me some of that same passion, that yearning to come to God's people, to love them and then to pray for them, to build them up in the faith and comfort them, to encourage them and edify them so they can go out to teach and witness to others.

Notice the three "I am's" in these verses. In Romans 1:14, he says, "I am under obligation;" and that is my stewardship—I am responsible. In Romans 1:15, he says, "I am eager" to discharge my obligation. And then in Romans 1:16, he says, "I am not ashamed of the gospel;" that's my message.

God doesn't ask you to do what you can't do. He doesn't ask you to give what you don't have. He just asks you to do your part. Paul is the master of God's purpose, but he's not the master of his own circumstances.

He says, "I can't control my circumstances. I want to come to Rome. The Lord willing, I want a prosperous journey to come to you. I want to come to the great metropolis. I want some fruitage there. Everything that is in me is ready."

Are you and I ready?

You know, when I think of this, I think of that little story in John chapter6 where it says5 ,000 people were hungry in the wilderness. A lad was there with five loaves and two fishes. That was all the Lord needed. And the startling thing to me was that the boy gave up his lunch. Believe me, that's a miracle—for a boy to give up his lunch when he is hungry!

The Lord took that lad's lunchjust what the boy gave Him—and He fed the whole5 ,000.

God said to Moses in Exodus 4:2, "What is that in your hand?" He had a dried up old stick, a rod. That was enough for God.

What do you have in your hand? What is your part?

You know, too many of us rationalize our unbelief and our disobedience. We alibi that we're too busy.

"Oh, Lord, I've got so much to do. I have so little time. I'm frantic. I have no time for myself."

Yes?

"The only time I can go out is on Sunday." Yes?

"I have no time for reading. I haven't even time to read the Bible."

Oh?

But you can read the newspapers and your magazines. You can do just what you want to do. Are you going to be able to say with Paul, "Thus, for my part, I am eager?"

His obligation Isaiah , "I'm a debtor." His yieldedness Isaiah , "I'm ready to do all I can do to discharge my debt." God doesn't ask you to do anything that can't be done by you.

"Well, if I only had Song of Solomon -and-so's gift—what I wouldn't do for God."

Oh?

"Well, if Song of Solomon -and-so was only saved. What a power for God he would be. But I could never reach him!" Oh?

All God asks of you is that you do your part.

Are you ready to meet your obligation of giving the good news from God to somebody else, someone you know, someone you love, someone with whom you—especially you—are in contact?

Are you and I yielded to God enough so that He can find us usable to reach men everywhere and to be able to say, "For my part, I am ready"?

Remember that God doesn't look for the great ones to do His work. He's looking for bondslaves.

He could say to Moses, "What have you got in your hand?" He could say to the disciples, "What have you got to feed these people?"

Someone has well said, "God can take a worm and thresh a mountain"; and He can take us as we are. You know, I'm full of amazement at the kind of people God picks up and uses.

I know many hundreds who are ministering the Word of God in every part of the world. He takes the most unlikely ones and uses them. His servants don't have to be brilliant orators.

God's good news is received by faith, not illumined to minds through brilliance.

The Spirit of God indwells you. You have the Son of God in whom the Father has hidden all His treasures of wisdom and knowledge.

All He wants is you. He'll do the rest. He can take a Gideon and thrash Midian. He can take a boy with five loaves and feed a crowd. He can take the rod of Moses and bring water from a rock and split the Red Sea.

What have you got in your hand? Are you going to say with Paul, "Thus, for my part, I am eager to preach the Gospel to you that are at Rome also"?


Copyright Statement

Bibliography
Mitchell, John G. D.D. "Commentary on Romans 1:15". "Mitchell's Commentary on Selected New Testament Books". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jgm/romans-1.html.

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