corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 1:5

 

 

through whom we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles for His name's sake,

Adam Clarke Commentary

Grace and apostleship - The peculiar influence and the essential qualifications which such an office requires. Without the Grace, favor, and peculiar help of God, he could not have been an apostle: he had an extraordinary conversion, and an extraordinary call to preach the Gospel. Probably χαριν και αποστολην, grace and apostleship, mean the same as χαριν της αποστολης, the apostolical office; for so the word χαρις means in Romans 12:3; Romans 15:15; 1 Corinthians 3:10; Ephesians 3:8. See the various acceptations of the word grace, Romans 1:7.

For obedience to the faith - That by this office, which I have received from God, and the power by which it is accompanied, I might proclaim the faith, the Gospel of Jesus; and show all nations the necessity of believing in it, in order to their salvation. Here is:

  1. The Gospel of the Son of God.
  • An apostle divinely commissioned and empowered to preach it.
  • The necessity of faith in the name of Jesus, as the only Savior of the world.
  • Of obedience, as the necessary consequence of genuine faith. And,
  • 5. This is to be proclaimed among all nations; that all might have the opportunity of believing and being saved.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.

    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-1.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    By whom - The apostle here returns to the subject of the salutation of the Romans, and states to them his authority to address them. That authority he had derived from the Lord Jesus, and not from man. On this fact, that he had received his apostolic commission, not from man, but by the direct authority of Jesus Christ, Paul not infrequently insisted. Galatians 1:12, “for I neither received it of man, neither was I taught it, but by revelation of Jesus Christ;” 1 Corinthians 15:1-8; Ephesians 3:1-3.

    We - The plural here is probably put for the singular; see Colossians 4:3; compare Ephesians 6:19-20. It was usual for those who were clothed with authority to express themselves in this manner. Perhaps here, however, he refers to the general nature of the apostolic office, as being derived from Jesus Christ, and designs to assure the Romans that “he” had received the apostolic commission as the others had. ‹We,” the apostles, have received the appointment from Jesus Christ. ‹

    Grace and apostleship - Many suppose that this is a figure of speech, “hendiadys,” by which one thing is expressed by two words, meaning the grace or favor of the apostolic office. Such a figure of speech is often used. But it may mean, as it does probably here, the two things, grace, or the favor of God to his own soul, as a personal matter; and the apostolic office as a distinct thing. He often, however, speaks of the office of the apostleship as a matter of special favor, Romans 15:15-16; Galatians 2:9; Ephesians 3:7-9.

    For obedience to the faith - In order to produce, or promote obedience to the faith; that is, to induce them to render that obedience to God which faith produces. There are two things therefore implied.

    (1) that the design of the gospel and of the apostleship is to induce men to obey God.

    (2) that the tendency of faith is to produce obedience. There is no true faith which does not produce that. This is constantly affirmed in the New Testament, Romans 15:18; Romans 16:19; 2 Corinthians 7:15; Mark 16:15-16; Matthew 28:18-19. This was the special commission which Paul received when he was converted, Acts 9:15. It was important to show that the commission extended thus far, as he was now addressing a distant church which he had not seen.

    For his name - This means probably “on his account,” that is, on account of Christ, John 14:13-14; John 16:23-24. The design of the apostleship was to produce obedience to the gospel among all nations, that thus the name of Jesus might be honored. Their work was not one in which they were seeking to honor themselves, but it was solely for the honor and glory of Jesus Christ. For him they toiled, they encountered perils, they laid down their lives, because by so doing they might bring people to obey the gospel, and thus Jesus Christ might wear a brighter crown and be attended by a longer and more splendid train of worshippers in the kingdom of his glory.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.

    Bibliography
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/romans-1.html. 1870.

    The Biblical Illustrator

    Romans 1:5

    By whom we have received grace and apostleship:

    Grace and apostleship

    I.
    Grace of apostleship, i.e., the favour of being an apostle. Given to the twelve (Matthew 10:1-2); to Paul (Acts 9:15; Act_13:2). The ministry of the Word is given as a mark of Divine favour. So Chrysostom deemed it when he said, “Not by our labour and industry, but by His grace”; and Philip Henry, after his ordination, “I received this day as much honour and work as I shall be able to know what to do with.” Especially was this a grace to one who had been a blasphemer and persecutor.

    II. Grace with apostleship, i.e., apostleship with the necessary gifts and graces, extraordinary gifts as well as spiritual grace (2 Corinthians 12:9; Galatians 2:9; Ephesians 4:8-11). The grace which calls also qualifies for office (Romans 12:3; Rom_15:5 : Ephesians 3:2). This is necessary, as was felt by Augustine when he said, “The ministry is a weight from which even an angel might shrink”; and by Luther, who, “though an old preacher, trembled each time he ascended the pulpit.”

    III. Grace, then apostleship, i.e., saving grace necessary to apostleship. Grace and office not to be separated (Psalms 50:16). A graceless ministry a grievous curse to the Church and to the minister himself. Of all callings the ministry is the most dangerous to an unconverted man, and more likely to destroy men’s souls than to save them. How dreadful to preach to others and be at last a castaway (1 Corinthians 9:27). Noah’s workmen refused to enter the ark and perished. (T. Robinson, D. D.)

    Apostleship

    1. Its source.

    2. Its privilege.

    3. Its object.

    4. Its sphere.

    5. Its motive. (J. Lyth, D. D.)

    For obedience to the faith.--

    Obedience to the faith

    Or (Gr.) obedience of faith:--

    I. Obedience. The gospels thing to be obeyed (Romans 6:17; 1 Peter 1:22; Acts 6:7). In it God commands as well as invites and offers (1 John 3:23). Men are commanded to believe the gospel (Mark 1:15); in Christ (1 John 3:23). Unbelief and rejection of Christ rebellion against God.

    II. Faith viewed--

    1. Subjectively is--

    2. Objectively--the doctrine of the gospel to be received in faith (Galatians 1:23; Gal_3:23-25). Gospel truth is only to be known and learned by a Divine revelation.

    III. Obedience to the faith.

    1. Obedience, in which faith consists. Faith is itself obedience. When God speaks men are not to reason, but to believe and accept. The Jews asked for a sign, Greeks for wisdom; God demands faith, and faith cordially submits to His method of salvation by Christ.

    2. Obedience as the fruit of faith. Faith in Christ is the mother of all true and acceptable obedience (Romans 15:18; Rom_16:19; 2 Corinthians 7:15; 2Co_10:5; 2Co_01:6; 1 Peter 1:8). Works without faith, faith without works, both alike dead (James 2:26). God seeks evangelical, not legal obedience, because the gospel, not the law, produces the love that alone fulfils it. Faith in Christ proved by obedience to Him as a tree by its fruit (James 2:18-26). Faith is the obedience of the understanding to God revealing its effect, the obedience of the will to God commanding. (T. Robinson, D. D.)

    Faith measured by obedience

    Our obedience being the child of faith, partakes of its parent’s strength or weakness. Abraham was strong in faith, and what an heroic act of obedience did he perform in offering up His Son! (W. Gurnall)


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Romans 1:5". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/romans-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

    Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

    Through whom we received grace and apostleship, unto obedience of faith among all the nations, for his name's sake.

    The use of "we" may be viewed either as the editorial plural applied to Paul, or as an inclusion with himself of all the other apostles, all of them having been shareholders in the apostolic commission and beneficiaries of the grace of God.

    Obedience of faith ... This is the first mention of faith in the Roman letter, and its being mentioned along with obedience is extremely significant. Paul was about to write the most important document on the subject of faith that the world would ever have, in which, of necessity, there would be written some of those things which even an apostle would consider "hard to be understood" (2 Peter 3:16); therefore, it was a matter of gracious discernment upon his part that, in the very beginning of the letter, he made it clear that, throughout Romans, "faith" should be read "obedient faith." Evidence is totally lacking that Paul ever considered "faith only" as efficacious in the procurement of salvation; because, as noted here, the apostolic commission was designed to produce the obedience of faith, and not merely faith alone. These same words, conjoined by apostolic authority, stand at the beginning of Romans and at the end, where they are mentioned in the final doxology (Romans 16:26), thus forming the archway through which one enters the portal and by which one departs this magnificent cathedral of sacred literature.

    Among all the nations ... anticipates what Paul was about to say of the forthcoming visit to Rome; because, much as he personally wished to visit there, a much higher priority belonged to his heavenly commission to "all the nations," which, to be sure, included Rome also; but the gospel was already known there. For such reasons as these, therefore, he had refrained from gratifying his personal desire to visit the great capital until it could be fitted into the larger strategy of preaching the gospel wherever it had not previously been proclaimed. The word "nations" here means "Gentiles," and it is so translated by Locke and many others. "For his name's sake" applies to the entire apostolic commission, with special emphasis upon the purpose of it, namely, to glorify and honor the Lord Jesus Christ. This is evident from the literal meaning of the phrase, which, according to Barrett, is "on behalf of his name."[10]

    ENDNOTE:

    [10] Barrett, op. cit., p. 21.


    Copyright Statement
    James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

    Bibliography
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/romans-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    By whom we have received grace and apostleship,.... That is, either by the Holy Spirit, from whom all grace and gifts come, qualifying for the discharge of any office; or by the Lord Jesus Christ, who is full of grace and truth, has received gifts for, and gives them to men to fit them for whatsoever service he is pleased to call them to. By "grace and apostleship" may be meant, either one and the same thing, the favour and honour of being the apostles of Christ; or different things, and the one in order to the other. Grace may design special saving grace in calling, justification, pardon, and adoption, and sanctification, which was received in common with other saints, and is absolutely necessary to an apostle, and to any ordinary minister of the word; or the doctrine of grace, which they received from Christ, and dispensed to others; or rather the gifts of grace, and the various measures thereof, which they received from their ascended Lord and King, by which they were furnished for apostleship, that is, the work and office of apostles; to which they were called by Christ, and from whom they received a commission to execute it. The apostle takes in others sides himself, and says, "we have received"; partly for the sake of modesty, and partly to keep up his equal title with others to this office; and since this is had in a way of receiving, which supposes giving, and excludes boasting, it obliges to make use of all grace and gifts to the glory of Christ, by whom they are received. The end for which they received such an office, and grace to fit them for it, was, "for obedience to the faith"; that men might be brought by the ministry of the word to obey the faith, Christ the object of faith; to submit to his righteousness, and the way of salvation by him, and to be subject to his ordinances or to obey the doctrine of faith, which is not barely to hear it, and notionally receive it, but to embrace it heartily by faith, and retain it, in opposition to a disbelief and contempt of it; and which is the end and design of the Gospel ministration to bring persons to, Moreover, by

    obedience to the faith, or "obedience of faith", as it may be rendered, may be meant the grace of faith, attended with evangelical obedience; for obedience, rightly performed, is only that which is by faith, and springs from it. Now grace and apostleship were received, in order to be exercised

    among all nations; not in Judea only, to which the first commission of apostleship was limited, but in all the nations of the world, as the commission renewed by Christ after his resurrection ordered; and that some among all nations of the earth might, by the power of divine grace accompanying the word, be brought to faith and obedience: and all this, the qualifications for the office, the due exercise of it in all the world, and the success that attended it, were

    for his name; for the honour and glory of Christ, in whose name they went, and which they bore and carried among the Gentiles, out of whom he was pleased "to take a people for his name", Acts 15:14.


    Copyright Statement
    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
    A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-1.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    i By whom we have received k grace and apostleship, for l obedience to the faith m among all nations, for his name:

    (i) Of whom.

    (k) This marvellous, liberal, and gracious gift, which is given to me, the least of all the saints, to preach, etc.; see (Ephesians 3:8).

    (l) That men through faith might obey God.

    (m) For his name's sake.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/romans-1.html. 1599-1645.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    By whom — as the ordained channel.

    we have received grace — the whole “grace that bringeth salvation” (Titus 2:11).

    and apostleship — for the publication of that “grace,” and the organization of as many as receive it into churches of visible discipleship. (We prefer thus taking them as two distinct things, and not, with some good interpreters, as one - “the grace of apostleship”).

    for obedience to the faith — rather, “for the obedience of faith” - that is, in order to men‘s yielding themselves to the belief of God‘s saving message, which is the highest of all obedience.

    for his name — that He might be glorified.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
    This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

    Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

    Unto obedience of faith (εις υπακοην πιστεωςeis hupakoēn pisteōs). Subjective genitive as in Romans 16:26, the obedience which springs from faith (the act of assent or surrender).


    Copyright Statement
    The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

    Bibliography
    Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    We have received ( ἐλάβομεν )

    Aorist tense. Rev., we received. The categorical plural, referring to Paul, and not including the other apostles, since the succeeding phrase, among all the nations, points to himself alone as the apostle to the Gentiles.

    Grace and apostleship

    Grace, the general gift bestowed on all believers: apostleship, the special manifestation of grace to Paul. The connecting καὶ andhas the force of and in particular. Compare Romans 15:15, Romans 15:16.

    For obedience to the faith ( εἰς ὑπακοὴν πίστεως )

    Rev., unto obedience of faith. Unto marks the object of the grace and apostleship: in order to bring about. Obedience of faith is the obedience which characterizes and proceeds from faith.

    Nations ( ἔθνεσιν )

    Or Gentiles. Not geographically, contrasting the inhabitants of the world, Jew and Gentile, with the Jews strictly so called, dwelling in Palestine, but Gentiles distinctively, for whom Paul's apostleship was specially instituted. See on Luke 2:32, and compare note on 1 Peter 2:9.


    Copyright Statement
    The text of this work is public domain.

    Bibliography
    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    By whom we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name:

    By whom we have received — I and the other apostles.

    Grace and apostleship — The favour to be an apostle, and qualifications for it.

    For obedience to the faith in all nations — That is, that all nations may embrace the faith of Christ.

    For his name — For his sake; out of regard to him.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

    Bibliography
    Wesley, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/romans-1.html. 1765.

    Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

    For obedience; for promoting obedience.--For his name; in his name.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.

    Bibliography
    Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/romans-1.html. 1878.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    5.Through whom we have received, etc. — Having completed his definition of the gospel, which he introduced for the recommendation of his office, he now returns to speak of his own call; and it was a great point that this should be proved to the Romans. By mentioning grace and apostleship apart, he adopts a form of speech, (20) which must be understood as meaning, gratuitous apostleship or the favor of the apostleship; by which he means, that it was wholly through divine favor, not through his own worthiness, that he had been chosen for so high an office. For though it has hardly any thing connected with it in the estimation of the world, except dangers, labors, hatred, and disgrace; yet before God and his saints, it possesses a dignity of no common or ordinary kind. It is therefore deservedly counted a favor. If you prefer to say, “I have received grace that I should be an Apostle,” the sense would be the same. (21)

    The expression, on account of his name, is rendered by [Ambrose ], “in his name,” as though it meant, that the Apostle was appointed in the place of Christ to preach the gospel, according to that passage, “We are ambassadors for Christ,” etc. (2 Corinthians 5:20.) Their opinion, however, seems better, who take name for knowledge; for the gospel is preached for this end — that we may believe on the name of the Son of God. (1 John 3:23.) And Paul is said to have been a chosen vessel, to carry the name of Christ among the Gentiles. (Acts 9:15.) On account then of his name, which means the same, as though he had said, that I might make known what Christ is. (22)

    For the obedience of faith, etc. — That is, we have received a command to preach the gospel among all nations, and this gospel they obey by faith. By stating the design of his calling, he again reminds the Romans of his office, as though he said, “It is indeed my duty to discharge the office committed to me, which is to preach the word; and it is your duty to hear the word and willingly to obey it; you will otherwise make void the vocation which the Lord has bestowed on me.”

    We hence learn, that they perversely resist the authority of God and upset the whole of what he has ordained, who irreverently and contemptuously reject the preaching of the gospel; the design of which is to constrain us to obey God. We must also notice here what faith is; the name of obedience is given to it, and for this reason — because the Lord calls us by his gospel; we respond to his call by faith; as on the other hand, the chief act of disobedience to God is unbelief, I prefer rendering the sentence, “For the obedience of faith,” rather than, “In order that they may obey the faith;” for the last is not strictly correct, except taken figuratively, though it be found once in the Acts 6:7. Faith is properly that by which we obey the gospel. (23)

    Among all nations, etc. It was not enough for him to have been appointed an Apostle, except his ministry had reference to some who were to be taught: hence he adds, that his apostleship extended to all nations. He afterwards calls himself more distinctly the Apostle of the Romans, when he says, that they were included in the number of the nations, to whom he had been given as a minister. And further, the Apostles had in common the command to preach the gospel to all the world; and they were not, as pastors and bishops, set over certain churches. But Paul, in addition to the general undertaking of the apostolic function, was constituted, by a special appointment, to be a minister to proclaim the gospel among the Gentiles. It is no objection to this, that he was forbidden to pass through Macedonia and to preach the word in Mysia: for this was done, not that there were limits prescribed to him, but that he was for a time to go elsewhere; for the harvest was not as yet ripe there.

    Ye are the called of Jesus Christ, etc. He assigns a reason more nearly connected with them — because the Lord had already exhibited in them an evidence by which he had manifested that he had called them to a participation of the gospel. It hence followed, that if they wished their own calling to remain sure, they were not to reject the ministry of Paul, who had been chosen by the same election of God. I therefore take this clause, “the called of Jesus Christ,” as explanatory, as though the particle “even” were inserted; for he means, that they were by calling made partakers of Christ. For they who shall be heirs of eternal life, are chosen by the celestial Father to be children in Christ; and when chosen, they are committed to his care and protection as their shepherd. (24)

    Pro nomine ipsius ,” — ὑπὲρ τοῦ ὀνὸματος αὐτοῦ; ad nominis ejus gloriam — to the glory of his name,” [Turrettin ]; “for the purpose of magnifying his name,” [Chalmers ] [Hodge ] observes, “Paul was an apostle that all nations might be obedient, to the honor of Jesus Christ, that is, so that his name may be known.” Some, as [Tholuck ], connect the words with “obedience to the faith,” as they render the phrase, and, in this sense, “that obedience might be rendered to the faith among all nations for the sake of his name.” But it is better to connect the words with the receiving of the apostleship: it was received for two purposes — that there might be the obedience of faith, and that the name of Christ might be magnified. — Ed.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.

    Bibliography
    Calvin, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/romans-1.html. 1840-57.

    Scofield's Reference Notes

    for obedience

    unto obedience to faith, i.e. faith as a principle, or method of divine dealing. Cf. Romans 10:1-11.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

    Bibliography
    Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Romans 1:5". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/romans-1.html. 1917.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    5 By whom we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name:

    Ver. 5. For obedience to the faith] That is, to the gospel (that doctrine of faith), or to Christ, who is often put for faith (whereof he is the proper object) in this Epistle. "Kiss the Son," &c. "Hear him," Psalms 2:12; Matthew 17:5.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-1.html. 1865-1868.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    Romans 1:5. We have received This is a modest way of expression; the Apostle meaning himself by the word we. Grace or favour, and apostleship, some think mean the favour of being made an apostle. Hence χαρις, grace, is put for the apostolic office; ch. Romans 12:3, Romans 15:15. 1 Corinthians 3:10. Ephesians 3:8 and in general grace or favour may signify any benefit, office, or endowment, which is the gift or the effect of favour. But others would keep the clauses distinct, "as it is certain, say they, that Paul did receive grace to subdue his heart to the obedience of Christ, and fit him to the ministry of the Gospel, before he received his apostolical commission, whenever we suppose that commission to be dated." Wells renders the next clause, to the obedience of faith concerning his name among all the Gentiles. Dr. Heylin's translation, though rather paraphrastical, seems to express the apostle's meaning: that I may, for the glory of his name [2 Thessalonians 1:12.] reduce to the obedience of faith [or of the Gospel] some among all nations.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/romans-1.html. 1801-1803.

    Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

    Observe here, 1. St. Paul declares the person from who, he received authority to be an apostle, namely, Christ himself: By whom he received apostleship; that is, by Jesus Christ, mentioned in the foregoing verse; who called him immediately, and furnished him with authority and ability for a gospel-preacher, even then when he had been a furious and fiery persecutor.

    Observe, 2. He declares how free and undeserved a favour this was; he acknowledges he had received grace to be an apostle, or a messenger of the gospel of Jesus Christ, is a special act and instance of divine grace and favour; By whom we have apostleship.

    Observe, 3. What is the special duty of an apostle, and the great end and design of that honourable function, namely, to call all persons to believe and obey the gospel.

    Learn thence, that the great end of the ministry of the word, is to bring sinners to believe and obey the gospel of Christ, to persuade them to yeild, not a professional subjection only, but a real obedience also to the gospel of Christ; By whom we have received grace and apostleship for obedience to the faith amoung all nations.

    Observe, 4. How the apostle puts the Romans in mind of their condition by nature, before the gaspel was revealed to them, and received by them; they were then Pagans and heathenish idolators, but now Christians, or the called of Jesus Christ, among whom (that is, among the Gentile nations) ye are also the called of Jesus Christ.

    Learn thence, That it is a necessary duty for ministers, and a profitable duty for the people, to put, and be often put in mind of what they were and are by nature; it is profitable, both to increase their humiliation, and also to excite their gratulation. "You Romans (as if the apostle had said)who are now the called of Jesus Christ, were once afar off, even amongst the vile and cursed Gentiles: let the remembrance of what you once were, keep you continually humble, and the knowledge of what now by grace you are, render you for ever thankful."


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/romans-1.html. 1700-1703.

    Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

    5. διʼ οὗ] as in Galatians 1:1; 1 Corinthians 1:9, designating the Lord Himself as the Agent in conferring the grace and Apostleship.

    ἐλάβομεν] not’ all Christians,’—but we, the Apostle himself, as he not unfrequently speaks. No others need be here included in the word. Those to whom he is writing cannot be thus included, for they are specially contrasted with the subject of ἐλάβομεν by the following ὑμεῖς. Nor can the aor. ἐλάβομεν refer to any general bestowal of this kind, indicating, as it must, a definite past event, viz. the reception of the Apostleship by himself. To maintain (as Dr. Peile, Annotations on the Epistles, vol. i. Appendix) that the subject of ἐλὰβομεν must be the same as the ἡμῶν which has preceded, is to overlook, not only the contrast just noticed, and the habit of Paul to use indiscriminately the singular or plural, when speaking of himself,—but also the formulary character of the expression, ‘Jesus Christ our Lord,’ in which the ‘we’ alluded to in ‘our’ is too faintly indicated to become the subject of a following verb.

    χάριν] Hardly, as Augustine, “gratiam cum omnibus fidelibus, apostolatum autem non cum omnibus communem habet” (Olsh.): for he is surely speaking of that peculiar χάρις, by which he wrought in his apostleship more than they all; see reff.

    ἀποστολήν] Strictly, apostleship, ‘the office of an Apostle,’see reff.: not any mission, or power of sending ministers, resident in the whole church, which would be contrary to the usage of the word. The existence of such a power is not hereby denied, but this place refers solely to the office of Paul as an Apostle. Keep the χάρ. κ. ἀποστ. separate, and strictly consecutive, avoiding all nonsensical figures of Hendiadys, Hypallage, and the like. It was the general bestowal of grace, which conditioned and introduced the special bestowal ( καί, as so often, coupling a specific portion to a whole) of apostleship: cf. 1 Corinthians 15:10.

    εἰς] with a view to,—‘in order to bring about.’

    ὑπακοὴν πίστεως] The anarthrous character above remarked (on εὐαγγ. θεοῦ, Romans 1:1) must be here borne in mind, or we shall fall into the mistake of supposing . π. to mean ‘obedience produced by faith.’ The key to the words is found in ref. Acts, πολύς τε ὄχλος τῶν ἱερέων ὑπήκουον τῇ πίστει, compared with Paul’s own usage of joining an objective genitive with ὑπακοή, see 2 Corinthians 10:5, εἰς τὴν ὑπακοὴν τοῦ χριστοῦ. So that πίστεως is the faith; not = ‘the gospel which is to be believed’ (as Fritzsche, citing ch. Romans 10:16), but the state of salvation, in which men stand by faith. And so these words form an introduction to the great subject of the Epistle.

    ἐν πᾶσιν τ. ἔθν.] in order to bring about obedience to the faith among all (the) nations. The Jews do not here come into account. There is no inclusion, and at the same time no express exclusion of them: but Paul was commissioned as the Apostle of the Gentiles, and he here magnifies the great office entrusted to him.

    ὑπὲρ τ. ὀν. αὐτ.] on behalf of His name, i.e. ‘for His glory:’ see reff. “In the name of Christ is summed up what He had done and was, what the Christian ever bore in mind, the zeal which marked him, the name wherewith he was named.” Jowett. See also Umbreit’s note. The words are best taken as belonging to the whole, from διʼ οὗ to ἔθνεσιν [as declaring the purpose for which the grace and apostleship had been received].


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-1.html. 1863-1878.

    Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

    Romans 1:5. To the general τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν, which designates Christ as the Lord of Christians in general, Paul now adds the special relation in which he himself stands to this common κύριος. He entertained too lively a consciousness of the bliss and dignity of that relationship, not to set it forth once more (comp Romans 1:1) in this overflowing salutation; this time, however, with closer reference to the readers, in accordance with his definite character as Apostle of the Gentiles.

    Romans 1:5-6 are not to be enclosed in a parenthesis; and only a comma should be placed after Romans 1:6.

    διʼ οὗ] through whom, denotes nothing else than the medium; nowhere, not even in Galatians 1:1, the causa principalis. The view of the Apostle is, as Origen rightly perceived, that he had received grace and apostleship through the mediation of Christ, through whom God called him at Damascus. Regarding Galatians 1:1, see on that passage.

    ἐλάβομεν] He means himself alone, especially since in the address he specifies no joint author of the letter; not however—as Reiche, following Estius and many others, thinks—using the plural out of modesty (in the solemnity of an official epistolary greeting?), but rather (comp Romans 3:9) in accordance with the custom, very common among Greek authors, of speaking of themselves in the plural of category (Krüger, § 61, 2; Kühner, a(322) Xen. Mem. i. 2, 46). This is, no doubt, to be traced back to the conception “I and my equals;” but this original conception was in course of use entirely lost. The opinion, therefore, that Paul here includes along with himself the other apostles (Bengel, van Hengel) is to be all the more rejected as unsuitable, since the subsequent ἐν πᾶσι τοῖς ἔθνεσιν points to Paul himself alone as the Apostle of the Gentiles. To understand Paul’s official assistants as included (Hofmann) is forbidden by the subsequent ἀποστολήν, which does not mean mission in general, but, as invariably in the N. T., specially apostleship.

    χάριν κ. ἀποστολὴν] grace (generally) and (in particular) apostleship. χάριν is to be understood, not merely of pardoning grace (Augustine, Calvin, Calovius, Reiche, Tholuck, Olshausen, and others), or of the extraordinary apostolic gifts of grace (Theodoret, Luther, and others, including Flatt and Mehring); for such special references must be demanded by the context; but on the contrary generally of the entire divine grace, of which Paul was made partaker through Christ, when he was arrested by Him at Damascus in his career which was hateful to God (Philippians 3:12; 1 Corinthians 15:10), converted, enlightened (Galatians 1:16), and transferred into the communion of God’s beloved ones and saints. The special object (Galatians 1:16) and at the same time the highest evidence of this χάρις which he had received, was his reception of the ἀποστολή,(323) and that for the Gentile world. Others find here a ἓν διά δυοῖν (Chrysostom, Beza, Piscator, Grotius, Glass, Rich. Simon, Wetstein, Semler, Koppe, Böhme, Fritzsche, Philippi, and others): χάριν ἀποστολῆς. This might certainly be justified in linguistic usage by the explicative καί (Fritzsche, a(324) Matth. p. 856; Nägelsbach, z. Ilias, iii. 100); but it arbitrarily converts two elements, which taken separately yield a highly appropriate sense, into one, and fails to recognise—what is involved in the union of the general and the particular—the fulness and force of the discourse moving the grateful heart. This remark applies also against Hofmann, according to whom the Apostle terms one and the same vocation “a grace and a mission;” in which view ἀποστ. is erroneously rendered (see above), and in consequence thereof εἰς ὑπακ. π. is then joined merely to χάρ. κ. ἀπ., and not also to ἐλάβ.

    εἰς ὑπακ. πίστ.] Object of the ἐλάβ. χάρ. κ. ἀποστ.: in order that obedience of faith may be produced, i.e. in order that people may subject themselves to the faith, in order that they may become believing. Comp Romans 16:26; Acts 6:7; 2 Corinthians 10:5 f.; 2 Thessalonians 1:8. To take πίστις for doctrina fidei (Beza, Toletus, Estius, Bengel, Heumann, Cramer, Rosenmüller, Matt, Fritzsche, Tholuck, and others), is altogether contrary to the linguistic usage of the N. T., in which πίστις is always subjective faith, although often, as in the present instance, conceived of objectively, as a power. Comp Romans 16:20; Galatians 1:23. The activity of faith in producing works (Reithmayr), however, is not contained in the expression. The πίστις is, according to Paul, the conviction and confidence (assensus and fiducia) regarding Jesus Christ, as the only and perfect Mediator of the divine grace, and of eternal life, through His work of atonement. Faith alone (to the exclusion of works) is the causa apprehendens of the salvation promised and obtained through Christ; but, because it transfers us into living and devoted fellowship with Him, altogether of a moral character, it becomes the subjective moral power of the new life regenerated through the power of the Holy Spirit—of the life in Christ, which, however, is the necessary consequence, and never the ground of justification. See Luther’s Preface.

    The genitive πίστεως, in accordance with the analogy of the expressions kindred in meaning ὑπακοὴ τοῦ χριστοῦ in 2 Corinthians 10:5, and ὑπακ. τῆς ἀληθείας in 1 Peter 1:22, necessarily presents itself (comp Acts 6:7; Romans 10:16; 2 Thessalonians 1:8; also 2 Corinthians 9:13) as denoting that to which the obedience is rendered; not (Grotius, following Beza) the causa efficiens: “ut Deo obediatur per fidem,” in which explanation, besides, the “Deo” is arbitrarily introduced.(328) Hofmann is also wrong in taking the genitive πίστεως as epexegetical (an obedience consisting in faith).

    ἐν πᾶσι τοῖς ἔθνεσιν] is to be joined with εἰς ὑπακ. πίστεως, beside which it stands; the ἔθνη, however, are not all nations generally, inclusive of the Jews (so most expositors, including Rückert, Reiche, Köllner, Fritzsche, Baur), but, in accordance with the historical destination of the Apostle (Galatians 1:16; Acts 9:15; Acts 26:17 f.), and in consequence of the repeated prominence of his calling as Gentile Apostle in our letter (Romans 1:13; Romans 11:13; Romans 15:16), all Gentile nations, to which also the Romans belonged (Beza, Tholuck, Philippi, de Wette, Baumgarten-Crusius, van Hengel, Ewald, Hofmann and others); and these regarded not from a geographical point of view (Mangold, p. 76), but from a popular one, as גוים ; which precludes us from thinking—not as to a section, but at any rate as to the mass, of the Roman congregation—that it was Jewish-Christian. This his apostolic calling for the Gentiles is meant by Paul in all passages where he describes the ἔθνη as the object of his labours (Galatians 1:16; Galatians 2:2; Galatians 2:8-9; Ephesians 3:1; Ephesians 3:8; Colossians 1:27; 1 Thessalonians 2:16).

    ὑπὲρ τοῦ ὀνό΄. αὐτοῦ] belongs, in the most natural connection, not to ἐλάβ.… ἀποστ. (Rückert) or to διʼ οὔ.… ἔθνεσιν (de Wette, Mehring, Hofmann), but to εἰς ὑπακοὴν.… ἔθνεσιν; “in order to produce obedience to the faith among all Gentile nations for the sake of (for the glorifying of, comp Acts 5:41; Philippians 2:13) His name.” Acts 9:15; Acts 15:26; Acts 21:13; 2 Thessalonians 1:12, serve to illustrate the matter referred to. The idea of wishing to exclude the glorifying of his own name (Hofmann) is not for a moment to be imputed to the Apostle. He would have needed a very special motive for doing so.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/romans-1.html. 1832.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    Romans 1:5. διʼ οὗ, by whom), by Jesus Christ our Lord.— ἐλάβομεν, we have received), we, the other apostles and I.— χάριν καὶ ἀποστολὴν, grace and the apostolic mission) These two things are quite distinct, but very closely connected. Grace, nay, a singular measure of grace, fell to the lot of the apostles, and from it, not only their whole mission, Ephesians 3:2, but also all their actions proceeded, Romans 12:3; Romans 15:15-16; Romans 15:18. The word ἀποστολή occurs in this sense in Acts 1:25. With the LXX. it signifies, sending away, a gift sent, etc. Obedience to the faith corresponds to grace and apostleship.— εἰς ὑπακοὴν πίστεως, for obedience to the faith), that all nations may become and continue submissively obedient to the word of faith and doctrine concerning Jesus (Acts 6:7), and may therefore render the obedience, which consists in faith itself. From its relation to the Gospel, the nature of this obedience is evident, ch. Romans 10:16, Romans 16:26; 1 Peter 1:2 : and ὑπακοὴ, obedience, is ἀκοὴ μεθʼ ὑποταγῆς, hearing with submission, ch. Romans 10:3, at the close of the verse. So, Mary believing said, Behold, the handmaid of the Lord, Luke 1:38; Luke 1:45— ἐν πᾶσι τοῖς ἔθνεσιν, among all nations) As all nations outwardly obey the authority of the Romans, so all nations, and so the Romans themselves also ought, with their whole heart, to be obedient to the faithὑπὲρ τοῦ ὀνόματος ἀυτοῦ), for the name of Him, even Jesus Christ our Lord. By Him grace has come, John 1:17; for Him, His ambassador’s act; 2 Corinthians 5:20; by Him faith is directed towards God, 1 Peter 1:21.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-1.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    By whom; or of whom; by whom, as Mediator, or of whom, as Author and Giver.

    Grace and apostleship: some make these two distinct gifts; the one common, which is grace; the other special, which is apostleship: others think, that, by an hendiadis, he means the grace of apostleship; which he so calls, because it was conferred upon him, not for any desert of his, but by the mere favour and free grace of God. It is his manner to call his apostleship by the name or style of grace: see Romans 15:15 Galatians 2:9 Ephesians 3:2,8.

    For obedience to the faith; you have the same phrase, Romans 16:26, and there it is rendered for the obedience of faith. By faith here some understand the gospel or doctrine of faith; it hath this sense, Acts 6:7 Jude 1:3, &c.; and then the meaning is, God, of his mere grace, hath given me this office, that I might bring the nations to believe, and work in them obedience to the doctrine of the gospel. Others understand the grace of faith; and then the meaning is, I have received this office, that I might bring the nations to believe, and so to obey the gospel. Therefore obedience is joined with faith, because by faith we obey the commands of God; and faith itself consists in obedience, and is the great command of the gospel.

    Among all nations; according to the general commission, Matthew 28:19, and a more special commission to this apostle; see Acts 9:15 Galatians 2:7,8 1 Timothy 2:7 2 Timothy 1:11.

    For his name; that the nations might believe in his name; so some: others suppose these words are added to declare the end of Paul’s preaching and apostleship, which was to set forth the glory and praise of Christ: see 2 Thessalonians 1:12.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 1:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-1.html. 1685.

    Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

    By whom; Jesus Christ.

    Grace and apostleship; the office of apostle, with that special grace which qualifies us to discharge its duties aright. Ephesians 3:8. In using the word "we," he joins himself with the other apostles.

    For obedience; that men of all nations might be led to obey Christ.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Family Bible New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/romans-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

    Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

    5. δι' οὗ. He who is the subject of the Gospel is also the agent through whom GOD dispenses those powers which enable men to minister the Gospel; cf. John 1:17; Galatians 1:1.

    ἐλάβομεν. The subject of Romans 1:1 is recovered—the apostolic commission exercised under the Lord. The aorist refers to the act by which the commission was given; cf. 1 Corinthians 2:12; 1 Corinthians 15:8-9; 1 Timothy 2:7; 2 Timothy 1:11. The plural = we Christian apostles (ct[61] τῶν προφητῶν α.) as 1 Corinthians 1:23; 1 Corinthians 2:12. But S. Paul certainly uses the plural with direct, though perhaps not exclusive, reference to himself, e.g. 2 Corinthians 10 passim; Moulton, p. 86.

    Χάριν καὶ ἀποστολήν. The close connexion of the words, and the immediate context, prove that χάρις is here used in the specially Pauline sense of the favour of GOD as extended to all mankind, with especial reference to S. Paul’s commission to the Gentiles, cf. Galatians 1:15 f., a decisive parallel; Galatians 2:7 f. cf. Robinson, Eph. pp. 224 ff., “the freeness and universality of the Gospel.” S. Paul felt that his commission was a signal instance of GOD’S free favour. Cf. also Romans 15:15; Philippians 1:7; 1 Corinthians 15:10. ἀποστολή = commission.

    εἰς ὑπακοὴν πίστεως, to promote obedience (to GOD) springing from or belonging to faith in Him (not from keeping of law). The phrase corresponds to εἰς εὐαγγέλιον θεοῦ in Romans 1:1 and indicates the attitude of recipients of the Gospel; their faith accepts and brings them to obey Him who reveals Himself in the Gospel as their GOD. The genitive is then a genitive of ‘derivation or foundation’ as in Romans 4:13; cf. Hort, 1 Pet. p. 89 (see the whole note). With ὑπακοή the genitive seems never to be objective in N.T. (not even 2 Corinthians 10:5). Obedience will be the sign of the coming in of the Gentiles as disobedience was the cause of the rejection of Israel; cf. Romans 10:21; Isaiah 65:12; Isaiah 66:4. It is the proper outcome of faith, the acceptance of GOD’s offer; cf. 1 Peter 1:2.

    ἐν πᾶσιν τοῖς ἔθνεσιν. Cf. Romans 15:12; Romans 16:26 = Gentiles: the πᾶσιν added to emphasise the universality of the commission, cf. 13.

    ὑπὲρ τοῦ ὀνόματος αὐτοῦ, i.e. of the Lord Jesus Christ. The name, both in O.T. and N.T., stands for the Person as revealed for man’s acknowledgment; cf. Acts 9:15. 3 John 1:7 (where see Westcott’s add. note) is an exact parallel; Acts 5:41; Acts 9:16; Acts 21:13, of suffering on behalf of the Name they proclaimed. The full force comes out Philippians 2:9-11. The idea, not the word, is present 2 Corinthians 5:20; Ephesians 6:20. ὑπὲρ then = to gain acknowledgment of Him as revealed.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-1.html. 1896.

    William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

    5. “Through whom we received grace and apostleship, unto the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles, for His name’s sake.” The redemption of Christ is the only procuring cause of salvation, the Holy Ghost the efficient cause, the preaching of the Word the instrumental cause, and faith the conditional cause.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-1.html.

    Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

    By Whom we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for His name.

    One of the first acts of the power of Jesus Christ, after His resurrection, was to bestow His Spirit and His grace on those who were chosen by Him, to qualify them to be His witnesses and the heralds of His Gospel.

    Paul was among that number, although appointed at a later period than the rest. We have received — He here speaks of himself in the plural number.

    He does not appear to use this style that he may include the other Apostles: what is true of him will, however, as to everything essential, apply to all the others. He distinguishes these two things, Grace and Apostleship. The first, which he had experienced in his conversion, and in every subsequent part of his course, he had received from Jesus Christ; and by Him also he was appointed to the office of an Apostle, to the discharge of which that grace was indispensably necessary. To the obedience of faith. — Paul, as an Apostle, was commissioned to preach the Gospel in order to the obedience of faith. Some understand this of the obedience which faith produces; but the usual import of the expression, as well as the connection in this place, determines it to apply to the belief of the Gospel. Obedience is no doubt an effect produced by that belief; but the office of an Apostle was, in the first place, to persuade men to believe the Gospel. This is the grand object, which includes the other. The Gospel reforms those who believe it; but it would be presenting an imperfect view of the subject to say that it was given to reform the world. It was given that men might believe and be saved. The obedience, then, here referred to, signifies submission to the doctrine of the Gospel.

    This is quite in accordance with those passages in which the expression is elsewhere found, as in Acts 6:7; Romans 6:17, 16:26; Galatians 3:1; 2 Thessalonians 1:8; 1 Peter 1:22; and in Romans 10:3; where the Israelites are charged with not submitting to the righteousness of God; and especially in the 16th verse of that chapter it is said, ‘But they have not all obeyed the Gospel; for Esaias saith, Lord, who hath believed our report?’ This is His commandment, that we should believe on the name of His Son Jesus Christ,1 John 3:23.

    The object, then, of faith, is not only a promise, but a promise accompanied with a command to accept it. For since it is God who promises, His majesty and authority accompany His promise. In respect to the promise, that which on our part corresponds to it is called faith; but in regard to the commandment which enjoins us to receive the promise, the act on our part is obedience. On this account, unbelief is rebellion against God. Faith, on the other hand, is an act of submission, or the surrender of ourselves to God, contrary to the natural opposition of our minds, in order that He may possess and conduct us, and make us whatever He pleases.

    When, therefore, that opposition is overcome by the weapons with which the Apostles were armed, namely, the word of truth, our submission is called the obedience of faith. ‘This is the work of God, that ye believe on Him whom He hath sent.’ The obedience of faith which His people render to Jesus Christ is an adoration which supposes His Deity; for when reason entirely submits and is swallowed up in His authority, it is a real adoration. ‘Faith,’ says Calvin on this passage, ‘is adorned with the title of obedience, because the Lord calls us by His Gospel, and by faith we answer when He calls us; as, on the contrary, unbelief is the height of all rebellion against God.’ Among all nations. — Paul here assigns the reason why he preaches to Gentiles, namely, that it is the destination of his office or apostleship, and not solely his own choice, Galatians 2:7. In past ages, God had suffered all nations, with the exception of the Jews, to walk in their own ways, although He had not left Himself without witness in the works of creation and providence. Both in the universal deluge, and also upon other occasions, He had manifested His wrath on account of sin, and His determination to punish it. But after the establishment of the nation of Israel in Canaan, after the institution of His public worship among them, and after He had given to them His written revelation, He did not generally interpose His authority in a visible manner to turn the nations from the ways they had chosen. Although, therefore, the times of this ignorance God winked at, He now commanded all men to repent. For ‘thus it is written,’ that when Christ suffered and rose from the dead, ‘repentance and remission of sins should be preached in His name among all nations,’ Luke 24:47. And accordingly Paul closes this Epistle by declaring that it was by the commandment of the everlasting God that the mystery, which had been kept secret from ages and generations, should be made known to all nations, in order to the obedience of faith. This was in conformity to the commission given by the Lord Himself to His eleven Apostles, to go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature; and likewise to the particular command afterwards received by Paul respecting the Gentiles, ‘To open their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God.’ Thus the Gospel of the uncircumcision was in a special manner committed to Paul, to which in the verse before us he refers. For His name. — The Gospel is preached among all nations for the obedience of faith, but paramount to this is the glory of the name of Jesus Christ. The name, the glory, and the authority of God have the same signification. The world was created for God’s glory, and His glory is the chief end of the restoration of sinners. The acts of His goodness to His people are declared to be done for His own name’s sake; and for the same end His judgments also are executed on sinners, for His own name, Romans 9:17. Men are very unwilling to admit that God should have any end with respect to them greater than their happiness. But His own glory is everywhere in the Scriptures represented as the chief end of man’s existence, and of the existence of all things. It is in the name of Jesus that His people are taught to pray; and we are baptized into the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, as into one name. This affords unanswerable proof of the divinity of Christ. Paul was a chosen vessel to bear His name before the Gentiles, Acts 9:15. This verse concludes the general introduction to the Epistle; the easy transition to the particular address should not pass unnoticed.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-1.html. 1835.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    5. Grace—Gratuitous pardon and divine favour.

    Apostleship—A divine office for securing like grace to others.

    Obedience to the faithFaith without the article and in the genitive; obedience of faith, that is, an obedience consisting of faith as its vital power.

    All nations—Christianity, as Paul uniformly maintains, is a universal religion, to be preached to all, that it may be received by all.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/romans-1.html. 1874-1909.

    Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

    Paul probably meant that he had received the special grace (gift) of being an apostle. He introduced the character and scope of what follows in this epistle by linking his apostleship with the resurrected Christ. Jesus" descent from David and His resurrection proved that He was the Messiah and Lord promised in the Old Testament. Therefore the gospel that Paul preached as an apostle could bring all people, not just Jews, to faith in Him. It did not bring them to obey the Law of Moses. Obeying God by trusting in Jesus Christ is "for His [Christ"s] name"s sake" because it glorifies Him.

    "The law lays down what a man must do; the gospel lays down what God has done." [Note: Barclay, p3.]

    "Some one has truly said that the Gospel is "good news" not "good advice," ..." [Note: Thomas, p43.]

    Faith is obedience to God because God commands everyone to believe in Christ (cf. John 6:29; Acts 17:30-31). This verse is not teaching that saving faith always results in ongoing obedience to God, though that is normally its effect. [Note: See Robert N. Wilkin, "Obedience to the Faith: Romans 1:5 ," Grace in Focus10:6 (November-December1995):2-4.]


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/romans-1.html. 2012.

    Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

    Romans 1:5. Through whom, i.e., ‘Jesus Christ our Lord,’ which should immediately precede. The two verses should be separated only by a comma. Everywhere Paul speaks of himself as called by God to be an Apostle (comp. Romans 1:1), but called through Jesus Christ, who had spoken to him on the way to Damascus (Acts 9:4-5), and subsequently (Acts 22:17-21).

    We received. The Plural is used, although the context shows that he refers to himself alone. Such a custom was very common among Greek authors.

    Grace and apostleship. ‘Grace,’ in general; and ‘apostle-ship,’ in particular. The latter was indeed the special object and highest evidence of the former, but the two ideas are not to be confounded. Without the grace so fully bestowed upon him he could not have been an Apostle (comp. Ephesians 3:8), but his apostleship was a special gift. As suggested above (see Romans 1:1), the Apostles, as such, have no successors, yet the connection of the words, ‘grace and apostleship,’ implies that a gift of grace must underlie all genuine service in the church, that without this there is certainly no call to the ministry.

    Unto obedience of faith. This might be paraphrased: ‘in order to produce obedience to faith.’ ‘The faith’ is misleading, for it suggests a body of doctrine, whereas ‘faith’ in the New Testament, well-nigh invariably, means ‘believing,’ not what is believed. On the other hand, the two ideas of ‘obedience’ and ‘faith’ must not be confounded, by explaining that obedience consists in faith, or has faith as its controlling principle. For ‘faith’ is that to which the obedience is rendered. The end of his apostleship was that people might submit themselves to faith, become believers; this would result in a new and true obedience, but of this he is not now speaking. That ‘Jesus Christ our Lord’ was the object of this faith is clear enough.

    Among all the nation, or, ‘Gentiles,’ as the word is usually translated, comp. Romans 1:13. The only objection to rendering it thus in this instance, is the probability that the Jews may be Included, since he addresses himself to all the Christians at Rome (Romans 1:6-7), some of whom were Jews; but usually Paul emphasizes his apostleship to the Gentiles. The words qualify ‘unto obedience of faith.’

    For his name’s take. For the glorifying of His name. Comp. Acts 9:16; Acts 15:26; Acts 21:13; 2 Thessalonians 1:12. The end of his apostleship was that men in all the nations might believe, and the end of their believing was the glory of Christ in whom they believed. Hence this was the end of his preaching. In the ‘name’ of Christ is summed up all that He was, did, and suffered. The expression is borrowed from the Hebrew.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-1.html. 1879-90.

    The Expositor's Greek Testament

    Romans 1:5. Through Christ Paul received χάριν κ. ἀποστολήν. The plural, ἐλάβομεν, may mean no more than the singular, or may proceed from the latent consciousness that the writer is not the only person entitled to say this; it is not expressly meant to include others. χάρις, grace, is common to all Christians; ἀποστολὴ rests upon a specialised χάρις and implies competence as well as vocation. But in the N.T. these are hardly distinguished; it is a man’s χάρισμα which constitutes his “call” to any particular service in the Church. εἰς ὑπακοὴν πίστεως: the object of the apostleship received through Christ is obedience of faith, i.e., the obedience which consists in faith (but cf. Acts 6:7) among all the Gentiles. Cf. chap. Romans 10:16, 2 Thessalonians 1:8. The meaning of ἔθνεσιν (Gentiles, not nations) is fixed by Romans 1:13 and by Paul’s conception of his own vocation, Galatians 1:16; Galatians 2:8, Ephesians 3:1 ff. ὑπὲρ τοῦ ὀνόματος αὐτοῦ: the final purpose of his vocation is that Christ’s name may be above every name.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". The Expositor's Greek Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/romans-1.html. 1897-1910.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    By whom, i.e. by this same Jesus Christ, God and man, we, I and the rest of the apostles, have received this grace and apostleship, this mission and commission from him, of preaching his gospel, and teaching his doctrine. --- For obedience to the faith in all nations; that is, to bring all nations to the obedience and profession of his new law and doctrine. (Witham)


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/romans-1.html. 1859.

    Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

    Romans 1:5 through whom we received grace and apostleship, unto obedience of faith among all the nations, for his name"s sake;

    "Unto obedience of faith"-Paul"s purpose as an apostle involving bringing those from all nations to a obedient faith. Therefore the "faith" that justifies in this book, is an obedient faith. Of course, we already knew that.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/romans-1.html. 1999-2014.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    grace and apostleship. Some see here the Figure of speech Hendiadys (App-6), and read "apostolic grace".

    grace. Greek. charis. App-184.

    apostleship. See Acts 1:25.

    obedience to the faith = faith-obedience.

    faith. App-150.

    among. Greek. en. App-104.

    nations = Gentiles. Greek. ethnos. Occurs in Romans twenty-nine times; translated "Gentiles" except here, Romans 4:17, Romans 4:18; Romans 10:19; Romans 16:26.

    for = on behalf of. Greek. huper. App-104.

    name. See Acts 2:21.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-1.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    By whom we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name:

    By whom we have received , [ elabomen (Greek #2983)] - 'we received;' that is, at the period of his conversion. In the plural "we" there is no reference to any other than himself. In epistolary compositions (as Tholuck remarks) the plural is largely used, and the New Testament writers, as Cicero sometimes does, alternate between the plural and the singular in the same breath (see 2 Corinthians 5:11; Colossians 4:3; 2 Peter 1:15-16).

    Grace and apostleship - not exactly 'the grace of apostleship' (by what grammarians call hendiadys, as Chrysostom, Beza, Philippi, etc., take it). The "grace" is what he had in common with all believers; the "apostleship" was special to the selected few. But since grace made him at one and the same time a believer and an apostle, we can hardly doubt that the former is here referred to only as his divine preparation for the latter: cf. Ephesians 3:8, "To me who am less than the least of all saints is this grace given that I should preach." etc.; and 1 Timothy 1:12-14, "I thank Christ Jesus, who hath enabled me ... putting me into the ministry, who was before a blasphemer ... And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant," etc.

    For obedience to the faith , [ eis (Greek #1519) hupakoeen (Greek #5218) pisteoos (Greek #4102)] - rather, 'for the obedience of faith;' or in order that men might yield to the Gospel the highest of all homage, which is to believe it (John 6:28-29; 1 John 3:23). Hence, the phrase to "obey the Gospel" (Romans 10:16; 2 Thessalonians 1:8 : cf. Romans 16:26; Acts 6:7).

    Among all nations, for (or 'in behalf of') his name - that is, for spreading abroad the savour of it, manifesting His work, character, and glory (Philippians 2:10). "The name of the Lord" is a phrase of such frequent occurrence in the Old Testament, that it became a household word for all that is most precious in His revealed character. Yet that very phrase, and in exactly the same sense, is appropriated to Christ by all the New Testament writers. And so studiously is this done, that no impartial reader can doubt that they regarded Jesus of Nazareth as having rightfully served Himself heir both to all the perfections of the God of Israel and to all the relations in which He stood to His people. (See the notes at Matthew 22:1-2, and Remark 1 at the close of that section, p. 107.)


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (5) Through Him—through Christ the Son—he, Paul, had received his own special’ endowment and commission to bring over the Gentiles into that state of loyal and dutiful submission which has its root in faith; all which would tend to the glory of His name.

    We have received.—The Apostle means himself alone, but the plural is used (as frequently in Greek) with delicate tact, so as to avoid an appearance of egotism or assumption.

    Grace and apostleship.—Grace is here divine favour manifested in various ways, but especially in his conversion. St. Augustine notes that grace is common to the Apostle with all believers—his apostleship is something special and peculiar; yet apostleship is an instance, or case, of grace. Origen distinguishes between the two—“grace for the endurance of labours, apostleship for authority in preaching;” but both terms are perhaps somewhat wider than this. Apostleship includes all those privileges which St. Paul possessed as an Apostle; grace is all those privileges that he possessed as a Christian. At the same time, in either case the meaning tends in the direction of that particular object which is expressed in the next clause. The light in which the Apostle valued most the gifts that had been bestowed upon him, was inasmuch as they enabled him to preach the gospel to the Gentiles.

    For obedience to the faith among all nations.—Literally, For (to produce) obedience of faith (the obedience which springs from faith) among all the Gentiles.

    Faith is not here equivalent to “the faith”—a positive body of doctrine received and believed—but, in its strict sense, that active habit and attitude of mind by which the Christian shows his devotion and loyalty to Christ, and his total dependence on Him (Galatians 2:19).

    For his name.—For His name’s sake. “His,” i.e., Christ’s. The whole of that divine economy of which St. Paul himself forms part, tends to the glory of Christ. The Apostle’s call to his office, his special endowment for his ministry, the success of his preaching among the Gentiles, as they proceed from Christ, so also have for their object the extension of His kingdom.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-1.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    By whom we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name:
    we have
    12:3; 15:15,16; John 1:16; 1 Corinthians 15:10; 2 Corinthians 3:5,6; Galatians 1:15,16; Ephesians 3:2-9; 1 Timothy 1:11,12
    apostleship
    Acts 1:25; 1 Corinthians 9:2; Galatians 2:8,9
    for obedience to the faith
    or, to the obedience of faith.
    15:18,19; 16:26; Acts 6:7; 2 Corinthians 10:4-6; Hebrews 5:9
    among
    3:29
    for his name
    Malachi 1:11,14; Acts 15:14; Ephesians 1:6,12; 1 Peter 2:9,10

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-1.html.

    Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

    Through whom we have received grace and apostleship. As it was of the utmost importance that Paul's authority as an apostle should be acknowledged in the Church, he here repeats the assertion that he received his office immediately from Jesus Christ, whose exalted character as the Son of God and our supreme Lord he had just declared. Though δἰ οὗ properly means through whom, by whose instrumentality, the preposition must here be taken in a more general sense as indicating the source from whom. Comp. Galatians 1:1 διὰ θεοῦ πατρός. Romans 11:36; 1 Corinthians 1:9. The words χάριν καὶ ἀποστολήν may either be taken together and rendered the favor of the apostleship, or each word may be taken separately. Then χάρις refers to the kindness of God manifested to the apostle in his conversion and vocation. ‘Through whom we received grace, favor in general, and specially, the apostleship.'

    Unto the obedience of faith. These words express the object of the apostleship; πίστεως is either the genitive of apposition, "obedience which consists in faith;" or it is the genitive of the source, "obedience which flows from faith;" or it is the genitive of the object, "obedience to faith;" i.e., to the gospel. In favor of the last interpretation reference may be made to 2 Corinthians 10:5. ης ὑπακοὴ τοῦ χριστοῦ; 1 Peter 1:22 ης ὑπακοὴ τῆς ἀληθείας, obedience to the truth. See Galatians 1:23; Acts 6:7; Jude 1:3 for examples of the use of πίστίς in this objective sense. The subjective sense, however, of the word πίστις in the New Testament is so predominant that it is safest to retain it in this passage. The obedience of faith is that obedience which consists in faith, or of which faith is the controlling principle. The design of the apostleship was to bring all nations so to believe in Christ the Son of God that they should be entirely devoted to his service. The sense is the same if πίστις be taken objectively, understood, however, not of the gospel, but of the inward principle of faith to which the nations were to be obedient. Among all nations. The apostles were not diocesans restricted in jurisdiction to a particular territory. Their commission was general. It was to all nations. If these words are connected with we received, they express directly the extent of the apostle's mission, ‘We have received a mission among all nations.' If, as is much more natural, on account of their position, they are connected with the immediately preceding words, they express the same idea indirectly; his office was to promote obedience to the faith among all nations. For his name. That is for the sake of ( ὑπέρ) his name or glory. These words are most naturally connected with the whole preceding verse, and express the final end of the apostleship, viz., the honor of Christ. It was to promote the knowledge and glory of Christ that Paul had received his office and labored to make the nations obedient to the gospel.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 1:5". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-1.html.

    To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
    Powered by Lightspeed Technology