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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 1:6

 

 

among whom you also are the called of Jesus Christ;

Adam Clarke Commentary

Ye are the called - Ye Romans are all invited to believe in Christ Jesus, for the salvation of your souls; and to you, with the rest, my apostolical mission extends. This appears to be the most obvious sense of the word called in this place - to be called by the Gospel is to be invited to believe in Christ Jesus, and become his disciples. The word sometimes means constituted, or made, as in Romans 1:1.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Among whom - That is, among the Gentiles who had become obedient to the Christian faith in accordance with the design of the gospel, Romans 1:8. This proves that the church at Rome was made up partly at least, if not mainly, of Gentiles or pagans. This is fully proved in the xvith. chapter by the names of the persons whom Paul salutes.

The called of Jesus Christ - Those whom Jesus Christ has called to be his followers. The word “called” (see Romans 1:1) denotes not merely an external invitation to privilege, but it also denotes the “internal” or “effectual” call which secures conformity to the will of him who calls, and is thus synonymous with the name Christians, or believers. That true Christians are contemplated by this address, is clear from the whole scope of the Epistle; see particularly Philemon 3:14; Hebrews 3:1.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/romans-1.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Romans 1:6

Among whom are ye also the called of Jesus Christ.

The called of Jesus Christ

This expression denotes--

1. That the change is wholly of the Lord, that it is the effect of His own good pleasure, and accomplished by His Almighty power. Others may attempt it, but none can do it effectually but Himself. The Word may be the instrument, but its success is of Him alone.

2. The ease with which this great work is accomplished, for what more easy than to do it with a word. In the morning of creation God said, “Let there be light, and there was light.” In the morning of conversion His mandate is equally sovereign and efficacious.

3. The great difference that is made between the former and present state of the person called. It clearly implies that a separation existed between the parties, and that in virtue of this call the sinner is brought nigh to God.

I. The nature of this holy calling. There are various calls mentioned in the Scriptures.

1. To particular services of a civil nature. God called Cyrus to the conquest of nations, and to be the protector of Israel. A person’s secular employment is said to be his calling; it is the work to which Providence invites him (Isaiah 45:4; 1 Corinthians 7:20).

2. To office, as when Paul was called to the apostleship (Romans 1:1). Thus every faithful minister of the gospel, in an inferior degree, is called of God (1 Corinthians 12:7-11).

3. To mankind, wherever the gospel comes, to believe in the Lord Jesus Christ and be saved. But though all without exception are thus invited, few are chosen (Proverbs 8:4; Isaiah 55:7; Matthew 22:1-10; Acts 17:30). But the call mentioned in our text is peculiar to true believers.

It implies--

1. A conviction of the evil of sin, of the utter insufficiency of the creature, and of the want of a Saviour.

2. A sweet and powerful inclination of the whole soul towards God. The compliance is voluntary, while the energy is efficient and almighty. “I drew them with cords of a man, with bands of love.”

3. A solemn surrender of ourselves to be the Lord’s.

4. Certain effects. Sinners are hereby called out of darkness into marvellous light; from the bondage of sin, Satan, and the law, to the glorious liberty of the sons of God. It is said to he a holy and a heavenly calling, whereby we are called to the attainment of glory and virtue. It is that by which we are meetened for heaven. A partial but real conformity to God in this world will be followed by a perfect conformity to Him in the next; for whom He called, them He also glorified (Romans 8:30; 2 Peter 1:3).

II. The means employed. These are diverse, but it is the same God which worketh all in all. Some are called into the vineyard at the third hour, some at the sixth, some at the ninth, and some even at the eleventh hour of the day. Sometimes remarkable providences have become the messengers of unexpected mercy; sometimes fearful dreams, or the edifying discourse of pious friends, but more frequently the public ministry of the Word. The Lord calls some in thunder, others in the still small voice.

III. Its distinguishing properties. It is--

1. Personal and particular. The general call of the gospel is addressed to all who come within its sound, but this singles out the object and speaks to him as it were by name. “Zaccheus, come down.” “Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me?” The former is drawing the bow at a venture, the latter directs the arrow to the mark. The one is the act of man, the other the sole work of God: the one is directed to the ear, the other to the heart.

2. Secret and internal. It is visible only in its effects (John 3:8). Saul’s companions heard a sound of words, but knew not what was spoken.

3. Effectual. Many other calls are not so, even where God Himself is the speaker; for he speaketh once--yea, twice--to our senses, to our reason, in the works of creation and providence, and in the ministry of the Word, but man perceiveth it not, or does not regard it. But when God speaks to the conscience and the heart the sinner is made to hear and to obey, His language is, “Call Thou and I will answer--speak, Lord, for Thy servant heareth.”

4. Irrevocable. Not only the gifts, but the calling of God is without repentance (Romans 11:29), God is said to repent that He gave man a being, but never that He gave him grace,

Improvement:

1. How necessary and important is it that we give all diligence to make our calling and election sure (2 Peter 1:10).

2. Let us learn our obligations to Divine grace. Whatever we are enabled to do for Christ is the fruit of what He has done for us.

3. Let our gratitude for God’s distinguishing grace be exemplified by a course of universal obedience. (B. Beddome.)

The inspiring energy of a Divine call

Great heroes of history have often been represented as urged on, stimulated, or inspired by some influence beyond themselves. Whether it has been called a genius or a spirit, a demon or an angel, fate or providence, the principle is the same. They have either themselves believed, or the superstition of their followers has given birth to the idea that some overruling and irresistible power was leading them through the intricacies of their earthly course and directing their every step towards a predetermined end. Thus Joan of Arc, a simple rustic country maid, was led on by imaginary voices which she heard to seek the deliverance of her country from the hand of her enemies. She believed herself inspired to take the lead of armies and to place the crown of France upon the head of the rightful monarch. Nor did she cease or fail in her endeavours till she had roused her countrymen to vigorous action, led them on to victory, and restored the kingdom to him whom she regarded as its true and lawful king. (Harvey Phillips.)

The Christian calling ascertained

To every Christian man there is a heavenly calling, a Divine mission, a sacred consecration, and it behoves him to see, to contemplate, to study what that calling is and how he can best perform its sacred obligations. (Harvey Phillips.)

Life not to fall below the heavenly calling

A being already invested with a deathless life, already adopted into the immediate family of God, already enrolled in the brotherhood of angels, yea, of the Lord of angels; a being who, amid the revolutions of earth and skies, feels and knows himself indestructible, capacitated to outlast the universe, a sharer in the immortality of God--what is there that can be said of such an one which falls not below the awful glory of his position! Oh, misery, that with such a calling, man should be the grovelling thing that he is that, summoned but to pause for awhile in the vestibule of the eternal temple ere he be introduced into its sanctuaries, he should forget, in the dreams of his lethargy, the eternity that awaits him! Oh, wretchedness beyond words, that, surrounded by love, and invited to glory, we should have no heart for happiness, but should still cower in the dark, while light ineffable solicits him to behold and enjoy it! (Prof. W. A. Butler.)

The Christian calling should lead to service

Like as if the Queen, to show her puissance against a foreign power, should call forth some of her subjects who are most beholden to her to combat in her presence for her honour, they would, no doubt, strain all their strength in this service, yea, and their lives too: even so, much more ought we that are Christians to perform this duty to our God and Prince, who hath called us out by name to fight for His honour, to be a chosen and peculiar people unto Himself, to stand on His posts, to show forth His virtues and to be zealous of good works; yea, and, that we might the better perform this service, He had furnished us with His own armour and weapons, yea, and His own holy hand is with us too, though all men see it not; therefore we must endeavour to do valiantly, and to do our best, to answer the expectation of our heavenly King and Prince. (Cawdray.)

The gospel is

I. The call of God.

1. He provides it.

2. Speaks in it.

3. Sends it.

II. Addressed to all.

1. Of every nation.

2. To you in particular. (J. Lyth, D. D.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Romans 1:6". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/romans-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Among whom are ye also, called to be Jesus Christ's.

A glimpse of what seems to have been in Paul's mind when he wrote that line may be seen in Sanday's paraphrase, as follows:

Among these Gentile churches to which I am especially commissioned, you Romans too are called to the same obedience of faith, and therefore I have the more right to address you.[11]

The "called" are not merely those who hear the gracious gospel invitation, but are a company made up of the ones who obey. In a certain sense, all are called, in the sense that the gospel is for all mankind; and yet, in the Pauline usage of the word, it is applied to those who have responded to the great invitation. Such a word as "called" emphasizes the divine initiative in redemption.

ENDNOTE:

[11] W. Sanday, in Ellicott's Commentary on the Whole Bible (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Publishing House, 1959), vol. 7p. 203.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/romans-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Among whom are ye also,.... The Romans, though they were the chief, were among the nations of the world to whom the apostles were sent; and since Paul was called to be an apostle, and had, as others, grace and apostleship, and particularly the apostleship of the uncircumcision, or was ordained a teacher of the Gentiles, more especially he was an apostle to them, and as such was to be regarded by them. This seems to point out what they were originally; they were among all nations which lay in darkness; and were without Christ and hope, and God in the world; but now,

the called of Jesus Christ. The calling here spoken of is not to an office, or a mere external one by the ministry of the word, but an internal special call by the grace of God; and which is irresistible, efficacious, and unchangeable, and is an high, holy, and heavenly one; by it persons are called out of darkness into light, out of bondage into liberty, out of the world, from the company of the men of it, and the sinful pleasures thereof, to fellowship with Christ and his saints, and off a dependence on themselves, and their own righteousness, to the grace and righteousness of Christ, and to eternal glory. The persons so called are the elect of God, who are secured in Christ, and redeemed by him, and who has a concern with the Father and Spirit in the calling of them: hence they are styled, "the called of Jesus Christ"; they are called by him, and after his name; he has an interest in them; as they were before his chosen and redeemed ones, they are now his called ones; as Jacob and Israel of old were named of God, מקראי, "my called", Isaiah 48:12; so these were named Christ's called ones; and who by calling came to be partakers of him and of his grace.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Among whom are ye also the n called of Jesus Christ:

(n) Who through God's goodness belong to Christ.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/romans-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Among whom are ye also — that is, along with others; for the apostle ascribes nothing special to the Church of Rome (compare 1 Corinthians 14:36) [Bengel].

the called — (See on Romans 8:30).

of Christ Jesus — that is, either called “by Him” (John 5:25), or the called “belonging to Him”; “Christ‘s called ones.” Perhaps this latter sense is best supported, but one hardly knows which to prefer.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Called to be Jesus Christ‘s (κλητοι Ιησου Χριστουklētoi Iēsou Christou). Predicate genitive after κλητοιklētoi (verbal adjective from καλεωkaleō to call), though it is possible to consider it the ablative case, “called of (or from) Jesus Christ.”


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Ye also

As Romans among other Gentiles: not, called as I am called.


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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Among whom are ye also the called of Jesus Christ:

Among whom — The nations brought to the obedience of faith.

Are ye also — But St. Paul gives them no preeminence above others.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/romans-1.html. 1765.

Vv. 6 may be construed in two ways: either the κλητοὶ ᾿ι. χ. may be taken as a predicate: "in the midst of whom (Gentiles) ye are the called of Jesus Christ," or the last words may be taken in apposition to the subject: "of the number of whom ye are, ye who are called of Jesus Christ." The former construction does not give a simple meaning; for the verb ye are has then two predicates which conflict with one another: "ye are in the midst of them," and: "ye are the called of Jesus Christ." Besides, is it necessary to inform the Christians of Rome that they live in the midst of the Gentiles, and that they are called by Jesus Christ? Add the καί, also, which would signify: like all the other Christians in the world, and you have an addition wholly superfluous, and, besides, far from clear. What has led commentators like De Wette, Meyer, etc., to hold this first construction is, that it seemed to them useless to make Paul say: "ye are among, or ye are of the number of the Gentiles." But, on the contrary, this idea is very essential. It is the minor premiss of the syllogism within which Paul, so to speak, incloses the Romans. The major: Christ has made me the Apostle of the Gentiles; the minor: ye are of the number of the Gentiles; conclusion: therefore, in virtue of the authority of that Christ who has called you as He has called me, ye are the sheep of my fold. The καί, also, from this point of view is easily explained: "of the number of whom (Gentiles) ye also are, ye Romans, falling consequently like the other Gentiles called by me personally to my apostolical domain." The title κλητοὶ ᾿ι. χ., called of Jesus Christ, corresponds to the title which Paul gave himself, Romans 1:1 : κλητὸς ἀπόστολος, "an apostle by calling." They are bound to hear him in virtue of the same authority under which he writes to them, that of Jesus Christ. The complement: "called of Jesus Christ," may be taken as a genitive of possession: "called ones belonging to Jesus Christ." But it is better to regard it as a genitive of cause: "called ones, whose calling comes from Jesus Christ." For the important thing in the context is not the commonplace idea that they belong to the Lord; it is the notion of the act by which the Lord Himself acted on them to make them believers, as on Paul to make him their apostle. The idea of calling (of God or Christ), according to Paul"s usage, includes two thoughts, an outward solicitation by preaching, and an inward and simultaneous drawing by the Holy Spirit. It need not be said that neither the one nor the other of these influences is irresistible, nor that the adhesion of faith remains an act of freedom. This adhesion is here implied in the fact that the Romans are members of the church and readers of these lines.

If we needed a confirmation of the Gentile origin of the majority of this church, it would be found in overwhelming force in Romans 1:5-6, especially when taken in connection with Romans 1:4; and really it needs far more than common audacity to attempt to get out of them the opposite idea, and to paraphrase them, as Volkmar does, in the following way: "I seem to you no doubt to be only the apostle of the Hellenes; but, nevertheless, I am called by Jesus Christ to preach the gospel to all nations, even to the non-Hellenes such as you, believers of Jewish origin!"

We come now to the second and third parts of the address, the indication of the readers and the expression of the writer"s prayer.


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Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/romans-1.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

6 Among whom are ye also the called of Jesus Christ:

Ver. 6. Ye are the called] With a high and heavenly calling, Hebrews 3:1. {See Trapp on "Hebrews 3:1"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-1.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

6. ἐν οἷς.…] The whole to χριστοῦ should be taken together: among whom ye also are called of Jesus Christ; otherwise, with a comma at ὑμεῖς, the assertion, ‘among whom are ye,’ is flat and unmeaning.

De Wette and Calvin would take ἰησοῦ χρ. as a gen. of possession, because the call of believers is generally referred to the FATHER: but sometimes the SON is said to call likewise, see John 5:25; 1 Timothy 1:12 :—and with ἀγαπητοὶ θεοῦ following so close upon it, the expression can I think hardly be taken otherwise than as called by Jesus Christ. ἐκλεκτοὶ αὐτοῦ, Matthew 24:31, cited by De W. is hardly parallel.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 1:6. Application of the contents of Romans 1:5 to the relation in which the Apostle stood to his readers, whereby he indicates how he is officially entitled to address them also, teaching, exhorting, and so forth

ἐν οἷς ἐστε καὶ ὑμεῖς κλητοὶ . χ.] To be written thus, without a comma after ὑμεῖς, with Heumann, Lachmann, Tischendorf, de Wette, Hofmann, and Bisping: among whom also are ye called (ones) of Jesus Christ. Among the Gentile nations the Roman Christians were, like other Gentile-Christian churches, called of the Lord; amidst the Gentile world, nationally belonging to it (in opposition to Mangold’s mere geographical interpretation), they also shared this high distinction. The reference of the καὶ to Paul (Th. Schott), and consequently the interpretation: as I, so also ye, is erroneous, because the Apostle has asserted concerning himself something far higher than the mere Christian calling. The common interpretation of κλητοὶ . χ. as an address (so too Rückert, Fritzsche, Philippi, van Hengel, Mehring) makes the ἐν οἶς ἐστε κ. ὑμ. quite a meaningless assertion; for Bengel’s suggestion for meeting the difficulty, that ἐν οἶς has the implied meaning: among which converted nations, is purely arbitrary.

Since the calling (to the Messianic salvation; see on Galatians 1:6; also 1 Corinthians 7:17) is invariably ascribed by Paul to God (Romans 8:30, Romans 9:24; 1 Corinthians 1:9; 1 Corinthians 7:15; 1 Corinthians 7:17; 1 Thessalonians 2:12; 2 Thessalonians 2:14; comp Usteri, p. 281; Weiss, bibl. Theol. § 127; what Schmidt urges in opposition, in Rudelbach’s Zeitschr. 1849, II. p. 188 ff. is untenable) we must explain it, hot as: called by Christ (Luther, Rückert, Mehring, Hofmann, and others), but as: called (by God) who belong to Christ (so Erasmus, Beza, Estius, and most modern commentators, also Winer, p. 183). The genitive is possessive, just as in the analogous τοὺς ἐκλεκτοὺς αὐτοῦ in Matthew 24:31. With the substantive nature of κλητός (comp Buttmann, neut. Gr. p. 147) the genitive by no means admits merely the interpretation which points to the calling subject, as in 2 Samuel 15:11; 1 Kings 1:41; 1 Kings 1:49; Zephaniah 1:7; but admits of very different references, as e.g. in Homer, Od. xvii. 386, κλητοί γε βροτῶν are not those called by mortals, but those who are called among mortals (genitive totius).


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/romans-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Romans 1:6. ἐν οἷς), among which nations, that have been brought to the obedience of the faith by the calling of Jesus Christκαὶ ὑμεῖς, ye also) Paul ascribes no particular superiority to the Romans.—Comp. 1 Corinthians 14:36. He, however, touches upon the reason for his writing to the Romans. Presently, in the following verse, he directly addresses them— κλητοὶ, called), Romans 1:7.

V. 7. πᾶσι το͂ ις οὖσιν ἐν ῥώμῃ, to all that be in Rome) Most of these were of the Gentiles, Romans 1:13, with whom, however, Jews were mixed. They had been either born and educated at Rome, or, at least, were residing there at that time. They were dwelling scattered throughout a very large city, and had not hitherto been brought into the form of a regularly constituted church. Only some of them were in the habit of assembling in the house of Priscilla and Aquila, Romans 16:5. What follows, beloved, etc., agrees with the word all; for he does not address the idolaters at Rome— ἀγαπητοῖς θεοῦ, κλητοῖς ἁγίοις) These two clauses want the copulative conjunction, and are parallel; for he, who belongs to God, is holy [set apart]. Comp. Hebrews 3:1. The expression, the beloved of God, he particularly applies to the believing Israelites, ch. Romans 11:28; called to be saints, to believers of the Gentiles. The Israelites are holy by descent from their fathers, Acts 20:32, note. Comp. with annot. on Romans 1:1 of this chapter; but believers of the Gentiles are said to be sanctified or called saints, holy by calling, as Paul interprets it [‘sanctified’], 1 Corinthians 1:2. We have here a double title, and I have referred the first part to the Israelites, the second to the Gentiles. Comp. Romans 1:5-6, and add the passages, which have just now been quoted. The celebrated Baumgarten, in his German exposition of this Epistle, to which we shall often have occasion to refer, writes thus: “Hiedurch würde der gottesdienstliche Unterschied der Gläubigen und eingebildete Vorzug der Israëliten zu sehr bestätiget worden seyn, den Paulus vielmehr bestreitet und abgeschaffet oder aufgehoben zu seyn versichert.”(6) We answer: The privilege of the Israelite (although he who is called holy, is as highly blessed, as he who is the beloved of God) is as appropriate to be mentioned in Paul’s introduction, as the πρῶτον, ch. Romans 1:16 [to the Jew first], is appropriate in the Statement of his subject(7) there; which [the statement of the priority of the Jew, at Romans 1:16] Baumgarten defends enough and more than enough.— χάρις, grace, etc. This form of expression is the customary one in the writings of Paul. See the beginnings of his epistles, and also Ephesians 6:23.— ὑμῖν, to you) Supply, may there fall to your lot.— εἰρήνη, peace) שלום, peace: a form of salutation in common use among the Hebrews, before which is placed χάρις, grace, a term altogether consonant to the New Testament, and to the preaching of the apostles. Grace comes from God; then, in consequence, man is in a state of peace, ch. Romans 5:2, note.— ἀπὸ θεο͂ υ πατρὸς ἡμῶν καὶ κυρίου ιησο͂ υ χριστο͂ υ, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ) The solemn form of appellation used by the apostles, God and the Father, God our Father; and, when they speak to one another, they do not often say κυρίος, Lord, inasmuch as by it the proper name of GOD with four letters [ יהוה were the four letters, tetragrammaton] is intended; but, in the Old Testament, they had said, Jehovah our God. The reason of the difference is: in the Old Testament they were, so to speak, slaves; in the New Testament they are sons; but sons so know their father, as to render it unnecessary to call him often by his proper name. Comp. Hebrews 8:11. Farther, when Polytheism was rooted out, it was not so necessary, that the true God should be distinguished from false gods, by His proper name. κυρίου is construed, not with ἡ΄ῶν; for God is declared to be the Father of Jesus Christ, and our Father, not, our Father, and the Father of Jesus Christ; but [ κυρίου is construed] with ἀπὸ, as is evident from 2 Timothy 1:2. There is one and the same grace, one and the same peace, from God and Christ. Our confidence and prayers are directed to God, inasmuch as He is the Father of our Lord; and to Jesus Christ, inasmuch as He makes us, through Himself, stand in the presence of the Father.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Among whom are ye also; the Romans are in this number, and a part of the nations to whom I have a commission, and for whom I have received the grace of apostleship. He adds this, to show his warrant for writing to them, he did it by virtue of his office; as also to humble them; for though they were Romans, and such as bore the greatest sway in the world, yet they were formerly pagans and idolaters.

The called of Jesus Christ: though such were some of you, to wit, heathen idolaters; yet now you are Christians, and the called of Jesus Christ: called outwardly by his word, and inwardly by his Spirit. By effectual calling you are become his disciples and followers.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 1:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-1.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

6. ἐν οἷς κ.τ.λ. A hint of the reason of his writing to them. Cf. Romans 1:13.

καὶ ὑμεῖς. Throughout the Epistle S. Paul primarily considers Gentile Christians.

κλητοὶ Ἰ. Χρ. Called to belong to Jesus Christ, |[62] κλητὸς ἀπόστολος, Romans 1:1, and κλητοῖς ἁγίοις, Romans 1:7. The genitive stands for an adjective, e.g. Χριστίανοι.


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"Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-1.html. 1896.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

6. “In whom ye are also the elect of Jesus Christ:


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Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-1.html.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

Among whom are ye also the called of Jesus Christ.

Those to whom Paul wrote, were included among the nations to whom his commission extended. He mentions this, that it might not appear strange that he addresses them for the purpose of instructing them, but that, on the contrary, they should receive what he wrote with due confidence and respect. He was unknown to them by sight; he was far distant from them.

They might say, What interest had he in them? He assures them that his apostleship regarded and comprehended them, and that he did nothing beyond his calling when he desired to increase their knowledge, and confirm their faith. They were the called of Jesus Christ. Thus he had a double right, and was laid under a double obligation to address them, both as belonging to the nations to whom his commission extended, and also as having already become obedient to the faith. The apostolic commission consisted of two parts: first, to make disciples, and then to teach them to observe all things that Jesus had commanded. Thus Paul had a measure that reached even to those to whom he now wrote, as he had to the Church at Corinth, 2 Corinthians 10:13. Of Jesus Christ. — Not only called to Jesus, but called by Him; for He is not only that glorious person to whom we ought to go, but who Himself says, Come unto Me. The believers at Rome were called both with an external calling by the Gospel, and also with an internal calling by the Holy Spirit. Both these callings are ascribed to the Father, and also, as in this passage, to Jesus Christ, because the Son, as Mediator, is the minister of the Father, and executes all things for Him. As the high Priest of His people, He has done for them all that is required for establishing the New Covenant; but as the Prophet and King of His Church, He converts them and leads them to the Father. This expression, the called of Jesus Christ, imports that they belonged to Him, as in Isaiah 48:12, ‘Israel, my called,’ that is, who are mine by the right of calling.


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Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-1.html. 1835.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6. The called. (See note on Romans 1:1.)


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/romans-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 1:6. Among whom are ye also. To prepare for the address he says that his mission for the glory of Christ’s name is to them also; they are included among those for whom he received his apostleship.

Called of Jesus Christ. They were not called by Jesus Christ but called to tie His, since the call of believers is always referred to God. The article is wanting before ‘called,’ it seems better to place a comma after ‘also.’ ‘Called ‘may here mean effectually called, but ‘called’ and ‘chosen,’ or, ‘elect,’ are frequently distinguished in the New Testament; Matthew 22:14.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Romans 1:6. The Romans, as well as others, are included among the Gentiles, and described as Jesus Christ’s called. They belong to Him, because they have heard and obeyed the Gospel. “Calling” in Paul always includes obedience as well as hearing. It is effectual calling, the κλητοὶ being those who have accepted the Divine invitation.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". The Expositor's Greek Testament. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/romans-1.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Among whom are you also the called of Jesus. That is, you also are a part of those, who by his mercy, are called to this faith and belief in him. All beginning from those words in the third verse, who was made to him, &c. till the end of the sixth verse, are to be taken as within a parenthesis, which is not unusual in the style of St. Paul. Then he goes on after this long parenthesis. (Witham)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/romans-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the called. Compare 1 Corinthians 1:24.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Among whom are ye also the called of Jesus Christ:

Among whom are ye also - but only along with others; for the apostle ascribes nothing special to the church of Rome (as Bengel observes, referring to 1 Corinthians 14:36).

The called of Jesus Christ - not 'the called by Him' (as Luther, etc., though that is a truth), but 'Christ's The called of Jesus Christ - not 'the called by Him' (as Luther, etc., though that is a truth), but 'Christ's called ones,' or the called who belong to Him (so Erasmus, Meyer, Lange, etc.) - being called, not as all that hear the Gospel are (Matthew 20:16), but internally and efficaciously. And now at length comes --

(5) The Salutation itself


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) Among whom are ye also.—It is, perhaps, best not to put a comma at “also.” Among these Gentile churches, to which I am specially commissioned, you Romans too are called to the same obedience of faith, and therefore I have the more right to address you.

Called of Jesus Christ—i.e., not “called by Jesus Christ,” but “called and so belonging to Jesus Christ,” “your Master’s own elect ones.” (Comp. LXX., 1 Kings 1:41, where the words “guests of Adonijah” are in the Greek “called of Adonijah.”)


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Among whom are ye also the called of Jesus Christ:
are ye also
Ephesians 1:11; Colossians 1:6,21
the called
8:28-30; 9:24; 1 Corinthians 1:9; Galatians 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 2:12; 2 Thessalonians 2:14; 2 Timothy 1:9; Hebrews 3:1; 1 Peter 2:9,21; 2 Peter 1:10; Revelation 17:14

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-1.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

Among whom are ye also. The apostle thus justifies his addressing the Church at Rome in his official character. If the commission which he had received extended to all nations, he was not transcending its limits in writing as an apostle to any church, though it had not been founded by his instrumentality, nor enjoyed his personal ministry. Called of Jesus Christ. This may mean, Those whom Christ has called. But as the κλῆσις, or vocation of believers, is generally in the New Testament referred to God, the meaning probably is, The called who belong to Christ. Qui Dei beneficio estis Jesu Christi, Beza. The word κλητός is never in the epistles applied to one who is merely invited by the external call of the gospel. οις κλητοί, the called, means the effectually called; those who are so called by God as to be made obedient to the call. Hence the κλητοί are opposed to those who receive and disregard the outward call. Christ, though an offense to the Jews and Greeks, is declared to be ( τοῖς κλητοῖϚ) to the called the wisdom and power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24. Hence, too, κλητοί and ἐκλεκτοί are of nearly the same import; κατὰ πρόθεσιν κλητοί, Romans 8:28; comp. Romans 9:11; 1 Corinthians 1:26, 1 Corinthians 1:27. We accordingly find κλητοί used as a familiar designation of believers, as in Revelation 17:14 οις μετ- αὐτοῦ κλητοὶ καὶ ἐκλεκτοὶ καὶ πιστοί. See Jude 1:1. Comp. Romans 8:30; Romans 9:24; 1 Corinthians 1:9; 1 Corinthians 7:17 et seq., Galatians 1:15; Ephesians 4:1; Colossians 3:15; 1 Thessalonians 2:12; 1 Thessalonians 5:24; 2 Timothy 1:9. In these and in many other passages, the verb καλέω expresses the inward efficacious call of the Holy Spirit.

Theophylact remarks that the word κλητοί is applied to Christians, since they are drawn by grace, and do not come of themselves. God, as it were, anticipates them. The same remark may be made of most of the other terms by which believers are designated. They all more or less distinctly bring into view the idea of the agency of God in making them to differ from others. They are called ἐκλεκτοί θεοῦ. Romans 8:33; Colossians 3:12; 1 Timothy 1:1; or more fully ἐκλεκτοὶ κατὰ πρόγνωσιν θεοῦ, 1 Peter 1:2; ἡγιασμένοι sanctified, which includes the idea of separation, 1 Corinthians 1:2; Jude 1:1; προορισθέντες κατὰ πρόθεσιν τοῦ θεοῦ, Ephesians 1:11; σωζόμενοι, 1 Corinthians 1:18; 2 Corinthians 2:15; τεταγμένοι εἰς ζωὴν αἰώνιον, Acts 13:48.


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Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 1:6". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-1.html.

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