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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ruth 1:11

 

 

But Naomi said, "Return, my daughters. Why should you go with me? Have I yet sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands?

Adam Clarke Commentary

Are there yet any more sons - This was spoken in allusion to the custom, that when a married brother died without leaving posterity, his brother should take his widow; and the children of such a marriage were accounted the children of the deceased brother. There is something very persuasive and affecting in the address of Naomi to her daughters-in-law. Let us observe the particulars: -

  1. She intimates that she had no other sons to give them.
  • That she was not with child; so there could be no expectation.
  • That she was too old to have a husband.
  • 4. That though she should marry that night, and have children, yet they could not wait till such sons were marriageable; she therefore begs them to return to their own country where they might be comfortably settled among their own kindred.


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    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ruth-1.html. 1832.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    And Naomi said, turn again, my daughters,.... Supposing this resolution of theirs only arose from a natural affection, and not from any love to the God or people of Israel; at least doubting whether it was so or not, and willing to try whether anyone, or both of them, were really from a principle of religion inclined to go with her; and desirous that they would thoroughly consider what they did, lest they should repent and apostatize, and bring a reproach upon the true religion:

    why will ye go with me? what reason can you give? this she said in order to get out of them if there was any real inclination in them to the true worship and service of God; though she keeps out that from her own questions put to them as follows, that it might come purely from themselves:

    are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands? is there any likelihood that I should ever have any sons to be instead of husbands, or really husbands to you? can it be thought that at my age, supposing I had an husband, or an husband's brother to marry me, that there is in me a natural power of conceiving and bearing children? this therefore can surely be no inducement to you to go along with me; for some, as Jarchi, think she refers to the law of a husband's brother marrying his widow, and raising up seed to him, which was known among the Gentiles before it was given to Israel; see Genesis 38:8, to which Aben Ezra rightly objects, that that law respects a brother by the father's side, and not by the mother's only; to which may be added, that this law was not binding on a brother unborn, but on one that was living before the death of his brother; besides if this law had been in her mind, it would rather have furnished out an encouraging reason them to go with her, since there were kinsmen of her sons, to whom they might be married, as one of them afterwards was.


    Copyright Statement
    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
    A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-1.html. 1999.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands? — This alludes to the ancient custom (Genesis 38:26) afterwards expressly sanctioned by the law of Moses (Deuteronomy 25:5), which required a younger son to marry the widow of his deceased brother.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
    This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ruth-1.html. 1871-8.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands?

    Your husbands — According to the ancient custom, Genesis 38:8, and the express law of God, Deuteronomy 25:5, which doubtless she had acquainted them with before, among other branches of the Jewish religion.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

    Bibliography
    Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ruth-1.html. 1765.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    Ruth 1:11 And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? [are] there yet [any more] sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands?

    Ver. 11. Turn again, my daughters.] Though she were but their step-mother, yet, as one stepped in to be instead of a natural mother, she calleth them her daughters. It is good policy to preserve an opinion of our love in the hearts of those whom we would persuade to any good, and to speak them fair.

    Why will ye go with me?] q.d., Go not, unless ye be first of a well-knit resolution, lest all too late ye come in with a fool’s, Had I known. Those that intend for heaven must not dream of a delicacy: but, being to build the tower of godliness, let them consider first, and cast up what it will cost them, lest they with shame give over in the midst, and "lose the things that they have wrought": but that they may "receive a full reward." [2 John 1:8]

    Are there yet any more sons in my womb?] If you aim at worldly advantage, or are acted by sinful selflove in this your enterprise, I have not for you, nor am likely to accommodate you. See Luke 9:57. Sed vix diligitur Iesus propter Iesum, saith a father. Poor Christ is slighted.


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    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ruth-1.html. 1865-1868.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    Ruth 1:11. Are there yet any more sons in my womb, &c.— Naomi refers in these words to that very ancient custom, which seems to have existed from the beginning of the world, of the brother marrying the widow of his brother when the latter has died without children. See Genesis 38 and Deuteronomy 25:5. There is great beauty and pathos in this natural and unadorned relation of the parting of Naomi and her daughters.


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    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ruth-1.html. 1801-1803.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    According to the ancient custom, Ge 38, and the express law of God, Deuteronomy 25:5, which doubtless she had acquainted them with before, among other branches of the Jewish religion, wherein she did instruct them.


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    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-1.html. 1685.

    Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

    And Naomi said, “Turn again, my daughters. Why will you go with me? Have I yet sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands?”

    But Naomi recognised that she now had nothing to offer them. To women of those days almost nothing was more important than having a husband and producing children. And her problem was, how could she provide them with husbands, for she had no sons in her womb. In other words she was too old to bear children. And where would Moabite women otherwise find husbands in Israel apart from in the family?


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    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-1.html. 2013.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    11. Why will ye go with me — What purpose will it serve for you to accompany me further? What object of self-interest can ye have?

    Are there yet any more sons — This is said in allusion to the levirate law, which made it the duty of a person to marry his deceased brother’s widow and thus preserve his brother’s name and family. See the law, as detailed in Deuteronomy 25:5-10, and note at the beginning of chap. 3. Naomi here reminds Ruth and Orpah, in the spirit of her age and country, that she has no more sons for them.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-1.html. 1874-1909.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    Of me. Hence it appears that the Rabbins are under a mistake, when they say that those children who are born after the death of their brothers, are not obliged to take their widows.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
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    Bibliography
    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ruth-1.html. 1859.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    why . . . ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6.


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    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/ruth-1.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands?

    Are there yet any more sons ... This alludes to the ancient custom (Genesis 38:26), afterward expressly sanctioned by the law of Moses (Deuteronomy 25:5), which required a younger son to marry the widow of his deceased brother.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ruth-1.html. 1871-8.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (11) The advice of Naomi thus far is insufficient to shake the affectionate resolve of the two women. She then paints the loneliness of her lot. She has no more sons, and can hope for none; nay, if sons were to be even now born to her, what good would that do them? Still her lot is worse than theirs. They, in spite of their great loss, are young, and from their mothers’ houses they may again go forth to homes of their own. She, old, childless, and solitary, must wend her weary way back to live unaided as best she may.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ruth-1.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands?
    are there
    This alludes to the custom that when a married brother died, without leaving posterity, his brother should take his widow; and the children of such marriages were accounted those of the deceased brother. This address of Naomi to her daughter-in-law is exceedingly tender, persuasive, and affecting.
    that they
    Genesis 38:11; Deuteronomy 25:5

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ruth-1.html.

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