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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ruth 2:13

 

 

Then she said, "I have found favor in your sight, my lord, for you have comforted me and indeed have spoken kindly to your maidservant, though I am not like one of your maidservants."

Adam Clarke Commentary

Not like unto one of thine hand-maidens - I am as unworthy of thy regards as any of thine own maidservants, and yet thou showest me distinguished kindness.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ruth-2.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

Ruth 2:13

Let me find favour in thy sight, my lord; for that thou hast comforted me.

Good from encouraging words

Is there not a useful suggestion in all this to persons in places of authority and influence? There is sometimes a grievous fault in withholding praise from others. At the fountain-head of some of our greatest rivers a slight touch of the hand or foot would be sufficient to determine the course in which they should ever afterwards flow. And, in like manner, a kind word spoken to another at a moment when the heart is ready to faint may be the means of dispelling the chill of despondency, of stimulating the efforts of an honest industry, of confirming good resolutions, and of helping to fix the future destiny of a brother. Some persons are far too much afraid of the effect of a little generous and well-timed praise. They would keep all their flowers in an ice-house. Letting in a little sunshine upon them at times would not be amiss. Let masters and parents and teachers try the experiment of what an encouraging word or look can sometimes do. Let it be distinctly seen by those whom they can influence that they are on the side of whatever is virtuous in effort, noble in aim, and heavenward in aspiration. (A. Thomson, D. D.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Ruth 2:13". The Biblical Illustrator. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/ruth-2.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then she said, let me find favour in thy sight, my lord,.... Or rather, since she had found favour in his sight already: the words are to be considered, not as a wish for it, but as acknowledging it, and expressing her faith and confidence, that she should for time to come find favour in his sight, and have other instances of it; for so the words may be rendered, "I shall find favour"F26אמצא חן "inveniam gratiam", Pagninus, Montanus. , for which she gives the following reasons:

for that thou hast comforted me, and for that thou hast spoken friendly unto thine handmaid; had spoken in her commendation, and wished her all happiness here and hereafter; said kind and comfortable words to her, to her very heart, as in Isaiah 40:2 which were cheering, refreshing, and reviving to her:

though I be not like unto one of thine handmaidens; not worthy to be one of them, or to be ranked with them, being meaner than the meanest of them, a poor widow, and a Moabitish woman; the Septuagint and Syriac versions leave out the negative particle, and read, "I shall be as one of thine handmaids".


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-2.html. 1999.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

Ruth replied with true humility, “ May I find favour in thine eyes; for thou hast comforted me, and spoken to the heart of thy maiden (see Judges 19:3), though I am not like one of thy maidens, ” i.e., though I stand in no such near relation to thee, as to have been able to earn thy favour. In this last clause she restricts the expression “thy maiden.” Carpzov has rightly pointed this out: “But what am I saying when I call myself thy maiden? since I am not worthy to be compared to the least of thy maidens.” The word אמצא is to be taken in an optative sense, as expressive of the wish that Boaz might continue towards her the kindness he had already expressed. To take it as a present, “I find favour” ( Clericus and Bertheau ), does not tally with the modesty and humility shown by Ruth in the following words.


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The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/ruth-2.html. 1854-1889.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Then she said, Let me find favour in thy sight, my lord; for that thou hast comforted me, and for that thou hast spoken friendly unto thine handmaid, though I be not like unto one of thine handmaidens.

Such, Reader, will be the invariable consequence in the soul's view of grace. Never doth a soul lay lower before God than when the Lord is comforting that soul with the manifestation of himself. See Job 42:5-6.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/ruth-2.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then she said, Let me find favour in thy sight, my lord; for that thou hast comforted me, and for that thou hast spoken friendly unto thine handmaid, though I be not like unto one of thine handmaidens.

Tho' I be not — I humbly implore the continuance of thy good opinion of me, though I do not deserve it, being a person more mean, necessitous, and, obscure, a stranger, and one born of heathen parents, and not of the holy and honourable people of Israel, as they are.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ruth-2.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ruth 2:13 Then she said, Let me find favour in thy sight, my lord; for that thou hast comforted me, and for that thou hast spoken friendly unto thine handmaid, though I be not like unto one of thine handmaidens.

Ver. 13. Let me find favour in thy sight, (a) my lord.] May I be so happy as still to continue high in thy love and favour, though I be never so unworthy. See 2 Samuel 16:4. {See Trapp on "2 Samuel 16:4"}

For that thou hast comforted me,] viz., By thy praising me, praying for me, and speaking kindly unto me.

Oργης νοσουσης εισιν ιατροι λογοι.” - Aeschylus.

Comfortable words "do good like a medicine."

To thine handmaid.] He had called her "daughter": she thinks not the better of herself for that; she is his "handmaid" still, yea, she addeth, "Though I be not like one of thy handmaidens."


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ruth-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ruth 2:13. Though I be not like unto one of thy handmaidens Nothing can be more amiable than this humility of Ruth. Extolling the favour of Boaz to her to the utmost, she, as it were, annihilates herself; professing, that, stranger as she was, and of an idolatrous country, she considered herself as far inferior in condition to one of his meanest maid-servants. Blessed are they who humble themselves, for they shall be exalted! Houbigant renders this passage, would I might be one of thy handmaids!


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ruth-2.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Let me find favour in thy sight; I humbly implore the continuance of thy good opinion of me, though I do not deserve it.

Not like unto one of thy handmaidens; a person more mean, and necessitous, and obscure, being a stranger, and one born of heathenish parents, and not of the holy and honourable people of Israel, as they are.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-2.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. Thou hast comforted me — “To the humble mind of Ruth the words of Boaz were the first sunbeam that broke through the grief and tears of many weeks. Hitherto she had tasted only parting sorrow. Now, for the first time, she is addressed about the God of Israel and his grace. The full import of his words her humble heart does not presume to appropriate. But the kindliness of the speaker’s voice is for her like the sound of a bubbling spring in the desert to the thirsty. A word of love comes on a loving heart like hers, long afflicted by sorrow, like morning dews on a thirsty field.” — Cassel.

Though I be not like unto one of thine handmaidens — Though I be a stranger from a foreign land, and have done thee no service as these maidens who assist thy reapers, yet thou speakest to my heart words of comfort.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-2.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

Then she said, “Let me find favour in your sight, my lord, for you have comforted me, and because you have spoken kindly to your handmaid, although I am as one of your handmaidens.”

Ruth responds to the words of the great man with true humility. Basically she is saying, ‘let me continue to find favour in your sight’, for she has previously stated that she has found favour in his sight (Ruth 2:10). And she is grateful for the comfort that he has given her, which she may well have found lacking in some people in Bethlehem, and appreciates the fact that he has ‘spoken kindly’ towards her. ‘Your handmaid’ is in fact a typical way in which a woman, even one of some importance, speaks to someone important. There are any number of examples in Scripture (e.g. 1 Samuel 25:24). Thus Ruth is not literally seeing herself to one of his handmaids. What she is seeing is that she is not more important than they, which makes the kindness and gentleness of Boaz appear to her even more important. She is appreciating the comfort and the kindliness of a man of some importance.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-2.html. 2013.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Ruth 2:13. She said, Let me find favour — Or, I find favour, &c. For it is evidently an acknowledgment of the kindness she had already received, and not a petition for a further kindness. Though I be not like, &c. — That is, though I have not deserved it, being a person more mean, obscure, and necessitous, than one of thy handmaidens — A stranger, and one born of heathen parents, and not of the holy and honourable people of Israel, as they are.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/ruth-2.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Heart. This has the same meaning as the former part of the sentence. (Calmet) See Osee ii. 14. (Haydock) --- Maids, but more lowly and mean. (Menochius)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ruth-2.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

friendly = to the heart.

though I be not. Or, Oh that I might be.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/ruth-2.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) Friendly.—Literally, unto the heart. The same phrase is rendered comfortably (Isaiah 40:2).


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ruth-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then she said, Let me find favour in thy sight, my lord; for that thou hast comforted me, and for that thou hast spoken friendly unto thine handmaid, though I be not like unto one of thine handmaidens.
Let me find
or, I find favour.
Genesis 33:8,10,15; 43:14; 1 Samuel 1:18; 2 Samuel 16:4
friendly
Heb. to the heart.
Genesis 34:3; Judges 19:3
not like
1 Samuel 25:41; Proverbs 15:33; Philippians 2:3

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ruth 2:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ruth-2.html.

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