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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ruth 3:15

 

 

Again he said, "Give me the cloak that is on you and hold it." So she held it, and he measured six measures of barley and laid it on her. Then she went into the city.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Bring the veil - פחת המט hammit pachath ; this seems to have been a cloak, plaid, or what the Arabs call hayk, which has been largely explained elsewhere. See Judges 14:12.

Six measures of barley - We supply the word measures, for the Hebrew mentions no quantity. The Targum renders six seahs, סאין שית shith sein, which, as a seah was about two gallons and a half, must have been a very heavy load for a woman; and so the Targumist thought, for he adds, And she received strength from the Lord to carry it. If the omer be meant, which is about six pints, the load would not be so great, as this would amount to but about four gallons and a half; a very goodly present. The Targum says, that on receiving these six measures "it was said in the spirit of prophecy, that from her should proceed the six righteous persons of the world, viz., David, Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, Abednego, and the King Messiah; each of whom should be blessed with six benedictions." It is, however, remarkable, that the Targum makes the Messiah to spring from her through the line of David, and goes down to Daniel and his companions; which Daniel prophesied so clearly, not only of the advent of Messiah the prince, but also of the very time in which he was to come, and the sacrificial death he was to die.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ruth-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The vail - Quite a different word from that rendered “vail,” in Genesis 38:14. It seems rather to mean a kind of loose cloak, worn over the ordinary dress (see the margin).

Six measures - i. e. six seahs, in all two ephahs, twice as much as she gleaned Rth 3:17 , and a heavy load to carry; for which reason he laid it on her, probably placed it on her head. It is well known that women can carry great weights when duly positioned on their heads.

And she went into the city - The Hebrew has “he went,” namely, Boaz, where, accordingly, we find him Rth 4:1 .


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/ruth-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Also he said,.... Which seems to confirm the first sense, that what he had said before was to Ruth, beside which he also said to her what follows:

bring the vail which thou hast upon thee, and hold it; by which it appears that he rose also thus early, since he ordered her to bring her vail to him, and hold it with both her hands, while he filled it from the heap of corn: this vail was either what she wore on her head, as women used to do, or a coverlet she brought with her to cover herself with, when she lay down; the Septuagint renders it a "girdle", that is, an apron she tied or girt about her; which is as likely as anything: and when she held it, he measured six measures of barley; what these measures were is not expressed; the Targum is six seahs or bushels, as the Vulgate Latin version, but that is too much, and more than a woman could carry; unless we suppose, with the Targum, that she had strength from the Lord to carry it, and was extraordinarily assisted by him in it, which is not very probable; rather six omers, an omer being the tenth part of an ephah, and so was a quantity she might be able to carry:

and laid it upon her; upon her shoulder, or put it on her head, it being, no doubt, as much as she could well bear, and which required some assistance to help her up with it:

and she went into the city; of Bethlehem, with her burden; or rather he wentF2ויבא "et ingressus est", Tigurine version. Drusius, Junius & Tremellius, Piscator. ; for the word is masculine, and to be understood of Boaz, who accompanied her to the city, lest she should meet with any that should abuse her; and so the Targum expresses it,"Boaz went into the city.'


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Bring the veil that thou hast upon thee, and hold it — Eastern veils are large sheets - those of ladies being of red silk; but the poorer or common class of women wear them of blue, or blue and white striped linen or cotton. They are wrapped round the head, so as to conceal the whole face except one eye.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ruth-3.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

He then said, “Bring the cloak that thou hast on, and lay hold of it” (to hold it open), and measured for her six measures of barley into it as a present, that she might not to back empty to her mother-in-law (Ruth 3:17). מטפּחת , here and Isaiah 3:22, is a broad upper garment, pallium , possibly only a large shawl. “As the cloaks worn by the ancients were so full, that one part was thrown upon the shoulder, and another gathered up under the arm, Ruth, by holding a certain part, could receive into her bosom the corn which Boaz gave her” ( Schröder , De vestit. mul. p. 264). Six (measures of) barley : the measure is not given. According to the Targum and the Rabbins, it was six seahs = two ephahs. This is certainly incorrect; for Ruth would not have been able to carry that quantity of barley home. When Boaz had given her the barley he measured out, and had sent here away, he also went into the city. This is the correct rendering, as given by the Chaldee , to the words העיר ויּבא ; though Jerome referred the words to Ruth, but certainly without any reason, as יבא cannot stand for תּבא . This reading is no doubt found in some of the MSS, but it merely owes its origin to a mistaken interpretation of the words.


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The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/ruth-3.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Also he said, Bring the vail that thou hast upon thee, and hold it. And when she held it, he measured six measures of barley, and laid it on her: and she went into the city.

Veil — Or, the apron.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ruth-3.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ruth 3:15 Also he said, Bring the vail that [thou hast] upon thee, and hold it. And when she held it, he measured six [measures] of barley, and laid [it] on her: and she went into the city.

Ver. 15. Also he said, Bring the vail that thou hast.] Pallium, peplum: some render it the mantle, others the apron, others the sheet. Our west country women wear mantles when they go abroad: the women of the Isle of Man sheets, as was before observed out of Speed.

He measured six measures of barley.] Six ephahs, saith Bibliander: six gallons, saith Bunting. The Hebrew is, Six barleys; as much as she could well carry. God also sendeth not away his suitors without their bosoms full of blessings, even as many as they can bring faith to bear away. And in that Boaz gave not Ruth this at random, but measured it out, one well observeth, that liberality is not lavish of God’s blessings, but giveth in judgment, and not without consideration: for every virtue either is or should be guided with prudence.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ruth-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ruth 3:15. Bring the vail—and hold it Respecting the vail, see Exodus 12:34. The Chaldee paraphrase adds these words to the present verse: "Strength was given her from the Lord to bear it; and immediately it was said in prophecy, that six righteous persons should proceed from her, each of whom should be blessed with six benedictions, David, and Daniel and his three companions, and the King Messiah." She went into the city, is rendered by the Chaldee, Boaz went into the city, and the Hebrew seems to favour this interpretation.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ruth-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The veil, or, the apron, such as women ordinarily wear.

Six measures; known and usual measure: it is not determined how large those measures were, but this the nature of the thing shows, that they were no larger than one woman could carry in her veil, or apron.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15. Bring the veil — The long loose wrapper in which the eastern women envelope themselves when out of doors. Among the poorer classes its material is strong and coarse enough not to be at all damaged by the use here made of it.

Six measures — How large the measures were we have no means of ascertaining, and conjecture is vain. The Chaldee paraphrase has the following: “He measured six seahs (nearly two bushels!) of barley, and placed it upon her, and she received strength from the Lord to carry it, and immediately it was said in prophecy that there should come of her the six righteous ones of the world, each one of whom should be blessed with six benedictions — David, and Daniel and his companions, and King Messiah.”

She went into the city — Rather, He went, etc., for the form of the verb is masculine, and the meaning is, that he gave her the barley and sent her away, and then he also went into the city.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-3.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And he said, “Bring the mantle that is on you, and hold it.” And she held it. And he measured six measures of barley, and laid it on her. And he went into the city.’

But before she went he told her to hold her mantle in such a way that she could receive a gift, and he measured out six measures of barley and put them in her mantle. And he then left and went into the city. It is probable that this gift was highly significant, indicating his acceptance of Ruth on the terms he had agreed. He probably knew that Naomi would recognise in this that he was happy with the situation. Note on Ruth 3:17.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-3.html. 2013.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Mantle. The Syrian and Arabian ladies cover themselves all over with a large white veil, or piece of cloth, which has no hole", so that Ruth might conveniently carry the barley in it. --- Measures is not in [the] Hebrew or Septuagint. Most people supply ephi. St. Jerome, who has translated six bushels, (allowing three to the ephi; chap. ii. 17,) has understood that Booz gave Ruth two ephi. If we explain it of six ephi, the burden would be great enough, consisting of 180 pints or pounds of barley. Bonfrere would supply six gomers, each of which consisted of only the tenth part of the ephi, or three pints, in all 18. But such a present seems too inconsiderable. We may therefore stick to St. Jerome, whose six measures (Calmet--- modios, bushels; Haydock.) make about 60 pints; (Calmet) or, according to others, 160 pounds, which, though heavy, a woman might carry. The Septuagint insinuate, that Ruth carried the barley in her apron. (Menochius) --- And. Hebrew, "he went." But the text is probably corrupted. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ruth-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

vail = mantle or cloak, worn by all peasants; only the town-women veiling the face. Compare Isaiah 3:23.

she went -he went. The verb is masculine. Some codices, with Syriac and Vulgate, read "she".


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/ruth-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Also he said, Bring the vail that thou hast upon thee, and hold it. And when she held it, he measured six measures of barley, and laid it on her: and she went into the city.

Bring the veil that thou hast upon thee, and hold it , [ hamiTpachat (Hebrew #4304)]. Eastern veils are large sheets-those of ladies being of red silk; but the poorer or common class of women wear them of blue, or blue and white, striped linen or cotton. They are wrapped round the head, and fall down over the shoulders, enveloping the whole person (see Rogers' 'Domestic Life in Palestine,' p. 46; Graham's Jordan and Rhine, p.

195).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ruth-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Vail—Rather a mantle, so in Isaiah 3:22.

She went.—This should be, if we follow the current Hebrew text, he went. The verb is masculine (yabho), and the distinction is shewn in the Targum, which inserts the name Boaz as the nominative. It must be allowed that a fair number of Hebrew MSS., as well as the Peshito and Vulgate, take the verb in the feminine. The LXX. is from the nature of the Greek language unable to mark the distinction. The clause. if we accept the current reading, will mean that Boaz went to the city to find the kinsman whose claim lay before his own, while Ruth, laden with six measures of barley, goes to her mother-in-law.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ruth-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Also he said, Bring the vail that thou hast upon thee, and hold it. And when she held it, he measured six measures of barley, and laid it on her: and she went into the city.
vail
or sheet, or apron. The word mitpachath has been variously rendered. The LXX. translate it [ ] an apron, and Vulgate, pallium, a cloak. By the circumstances of the story, it must have been of a considerable size; and accordingly Dr. Shaw thinks it was no other than the hyke, the finer sort of which, such as are still worn by ladies and persons of distinction among the Arabs, he takes to answer to the [ ] or robe, of the ancient Greeks.
he measured
Isaiah 32:8; Galatians 6:10
six measures
The quantity of this barley is uncertain. The Targum renders it, shith sein, "six seahs." A seah contained about two gallons and a half, six of which must have been a very heavy load for a woman, and so the Targumist thought, for he adds, "And she received strength from the Lord to carry it."

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ruth 3:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ruth-3.html.

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