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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ruth 3:16

 

 

When she came to her mother-in-law, she said, "How did it go, my daughter?" And she told her all that the man had done for her.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Who art thou, my daughter? - In the dim twilight Rth 3:14 her mother was not sure at first who the young woman was, who sought admittance into the house.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/ruth-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when she came to her mother in law,.... To Naomi, in Bethlehem:

she said, who art thou, my daughter? it being near dusk, she could not discern her, or perhaps she put the question before she opened the door and saw her; though one would think, if Ruth had called to her, she would have known her voice: rather therefore the particle may be rendered, "what" or "how"F3מי את "quid egisti?" V. L. "quid tibi?" Tigurine version; so R. Jonah in Aben Ezra, & Abendana in loc. "quomodo tu filia mea?" Nold. p. 602. No. 1626. , instead of "who"; and the sense be, what had befallen her? what success had she had? how had things gone with her? was she married or not? or rather, had she got a promise of it? or was it likely that she should be married? with which the answer agrees:

and she told her all that the man had done to her; what kindness he had shown her, what promises he had made to her, that either he, or a nearer kinsman, would marry her, and redeem her husband's estate.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And when she came to her mother in law, she said, f Who [art] thou, my daughter? And she told her all that the man had done to her.

(f) Believing by her returning home that he had not taken her as his wife, she was astonished.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/ruth-3.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And when she came to her mother in law, she said, Who art thou, my daughter? And she told her all that the man had done to her.

Who art thou? — This is not a question of doubting, but of wonder, as if she had said, Art thou in very deed my daughter? I can hardly believe it. How camest thou hither in this manner, and thus early?


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ruth-3.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ruth 3:16 And when she came to her mother in law, she said, Who [art] thou, my daughter? And she told her all that the man had done to her.

Ver. 16. And when she came to her mother-in-law.] To whom she now made haste for three reasons, as is well observed: (a) (1.) For the danger of the way, being so early before day; (2.) The burden she bare, to be eased thereof; (3.) Her joy, to impart to her mother her happy success. The same reasons should prevail with us, to flee home to heaven: (1.) The danger we are in while in this dark world; (2.) The burden of sin; (3.) The joy we conceive of our future happiness.

Who art thou, my daughter?] Poor folk fear no robbing. It is bootless, we say, to rob a spittle.

All that the man had done unto her.] That is, Said unto her. Dei (sic et bonorum) dicere est facere. A good man’s promise is a done thing, as we call it.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ruth-3.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Who art thou, my daughter? either, first, She did not distinctly know who she was, because it was dark, and so calls her daughter only in general, as elder women call the younger. But she could as easily have discerned who she was, as what her age was. Or, secondly, This is not a question of doubting, but of wonder, as if she had said, Art thou in very deed my daughter? I can hardly believe it. How comest thou hither in this manner, and thus early?


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16. Who art thou, my daughter — That is, In what character dost thou return — as the espoused of Boaz, or only still a desolate widow?


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-3.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And when she came to her mother-in-law, she said, “Who are you, my daughter?” And she told her all that the man had done to her.’

When she arrived home Naomi asked her, ‘Who are you my daughter?’ It was possibly intended to be an enquiry as to whether her status had changed. Was she still Ruth the widow, or was she now a prospective bride, betrothed to a wealthy man and enjoying the benefit of a kinsman redeemer (a goel)? Alternatively it might simply mean, ‘How did things go? What was the result of what you did’ Ruth then explained to her all that had happened.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-3.html. 2013.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

What, &c. Hebrew, "Who art thou?" It was yet so dark that she did not know her. (Calmet)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ruth-3.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when she came to her mother in law, she said, Who art thou, my daughter? And she told her all that the man had done to her.

No JFB commentary on this verse.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ruth-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) who art thou?—We can hardly view this as a simple question as to Ruth’s identity, but rather as meaning, how hast thou fared?


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ruth-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when she came to her mother in law, she said, Who art thou, my daughter? And she told her all that the man had done to her.
Who art thou
Or, as the Vulgate renders, Quid egisti filia? "What hast thou done, my daughter?"

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ruth 3:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ruth-3.html.

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