corner graphic

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ruth 3:2

 

 

"Now is not Boaz our kinsman, with whose maids you were? Behold, he winnows barley at the threshing floor tonight.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He winnoweth barley tonight - It is very likely that the winnowing of grain was effected by taking up, in a broad thin vessel or sieve, a portion of the corn, and letting it down slowly in the wind; thus the grain would, by its own weight, fall in one place, while the chaff, etc., would be carried to a distance by the wind. It is said here that this was done at night; probably what was threshed out in the day was winnowed in the evening, when the sea breeze set in, which was common in Palestine; and as this took place in the evening only, that was the time in which they would naturally winnow their corn.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ruth-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Behold, he winnoweth barley … - The simple manners of Boaz and his times are here before us. This “mighty man of wealth” assists personally in the winnowing of his barley, which lies in a great heap on the floor Rth 3:15 , and sleeps in the open threshing-floor to protect his grain from depredation.

Tonight - For the sake of the breeze which springs up at sunset, and greatly facilitates the “cleansing” (separation) of the grain tossed up across the wind.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/ruth-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And now is not Boaz of our kindred, with whose maidens thou wast?.... He was, and her question supposes and concludes it, and which she observes, that Ruth might take notice of it, and encouragement from it; and the rather, since she had been admitted into the company and conversation of his maidens; and which was more, though not mentioned, into the company and conversation of himself, and whom Ruth knew full well; and who being, Naomi thought, the next nearest kinsman, and obliged by the law in Deuteronomy 25:5 to marry Ruth, with which view his relation is mentioned:

behold, he winnoweth barley tonight in the threshingfloor; which afforded a fit opportunity of meeting with him, being at night, and out of the city, from his own house, and alone, and after a feast for his reapers and threshers of corn, seems, from 2:7 as it was usual to have threshingfloors in an open place without the city, so to winnow at them, whereby the chaff was more easily separated from the corn, and that, in the evening, when in those countries there were the strongest breezes of wind to carry it off; hence the Targum here has it,"behold, he is winnowing the barley floor with the wind, which is in the night.'For before the invention and use of fans in winnowing, it was only done by the wind carrying off the chaff, as the oxen trod the corn, for it was done in the threshingfloor, as here: hence HesiodF13Opera & Dies, l. 2. ver. 221. advises that the threshingfloors should be χωρω εν ευαει, in a place exposed to wind; and so VarroF14De re Rustica, l. 1. c. 41. observes, the floor should be in the higher part of the field, that the wind might blow through it; to this manner of winnowing VirgilF15"Cum graviter tunsis", &c. Georgic. l. 3. Vid. Homer. Iliad 5. ver. 499. & Iliad, 13. ver. 588, &c. has respect. Nor was it unusual for great personages, owners of farms and fields, to attend and overlook such service. PlinyF16Nat. Hist. l. 22. c. 25. reports, that Sextus Pomponius, father of the praetor and prince of the hither Spain, presided over the winnowing of his reapers; so Gideon, another judge Israel, was found threshing wheat, Judges 6:11.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

he winnoweth barley to-night in the threshing-floor — The winnowing process is performed by throwing up the grain, after being trodden down, against the wind with a shovel. The threshing-floor, which was commonly on the harvest-field, was carefully leveled with a large cylindric roller and consolidated with chalk, that weeds might not spring up, and that it might not chop with drought. The farmer usually remained all night in harvest-time on the threshing-floor, not only for the protection of his valuable grain, but for the winnowing. That operation was performed in the evening to catch the breezes which blow after the close of a hot day, and which continue for the most part of the night. This duty at so important a season the master undertakes himself; and, accordingly, in the simplicity of ancient manners, Boaz, a person of considerable wealth and high rank, laid himself down to sleep on the barn floor, at the end of the heap of barley he had been winnowing.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ruth-3.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And now is not Boaz of our kindred, with whose maidens thou wast? Behold, he winnoweth barley to night in the threshingfloor.

Threshing-floor — Which was in a place covered at the top, but open elsewhere, whither Ruth might easily come. And this work of winnowing corn was usually ended with a feast.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ruth-3.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ruth 3:2 And now [is] not Boaz of our kindred, with whose maidens thou wast? Behold, he winnoweth barley to night in the threshingfloor.

Ver. 2. Behold, he winnoweth barley tonight.] By night they winnowed, ad auram nocturnam, as the Chaldee here hath it: (1.) Because more cool, as Genesis 3:8; (2.) Because then they had a better wind. Naomi remindeth Ruth of this opportunity, and willeth her to improve it. A well chosen season is one of the best advantages of any action. It may seem that Boaz himself had a hand in the work, howsoever an oversight. See Ruth 2:4. He might be of the mind of that Emperor (a) who said, Quo maior fuero, tanto plus laborabo: the greater I am, the more pains I will take.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ruth-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ruth 3:2. Behold, he winnoweth barley It is plain from the 7th verse, that this was a season of feasting, and that a kind of feast was given upon a completion of the harvest. The Chaldee paraphrase upon the 7th verse is, the heart of Boaz rejoiced, and he blessed God who had heard his prayer, and removed the famine from the land of Israel.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ruth-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Which was in a place covered at the top, but open elsewhere, whither Ruth might easily come. And this work of winnowing corn was usually begun or ended with a feast, as may be gathered both from Ruth 3:7, and from other instances, wherein they used to do so upon like occasions; and this work was to begin this evening, and, as some think, was done only in the evenings, when the heat grew less, and the wind began to blow. See Genesis 3:8.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. He winnoweth barley to-night — The night was chosen for the purpose because of the breeze which usually set in with the cool of the day. “The winnowing was performed by throwing up the grain with a fork against the wind, by which the broken straw and chaff were dispersed, and the grain fell to the ground. The grain was afterwards passed through a sieve to separate the morsels of earth and other impurities, and it then underwent a final purification by being tossed up with wooden scoops or short-handled shovels, such as we see figured in the monuments of Egypt.” — Kitto.

The threshingfloor — This was a level plot of ground of a circular shape, generally about fifty feet in diameter, and beaten down to a hard, smooth surface. Upon this the sheaves of grain were thrown, and the threshing was usually performed by driving cattle over them: the Scriptural mode of “treading out the corn.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-3.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And now is not Boaz our kinsman, with whose maidens you were? See, he winnows barley tonight in the threshing-floor.”

She reminds Ruth that the man who had been so kind to her was in fact their kinsman, knowing no doubt that Ruth would recognise the significance of that fact. Furthermore she knew where he would be that evening, for the harvest having been gathered in it would now be necessary for it to be threshed. Thus she knew that he would be in charge of the winnowing in the threshingfloor. The threshingfloor would be in an open area of ground where the ground had been beaten down and where it would be affected by the steady wind that blew at that time of year. The grain would be piled on the threshingfloor and would then be tossed up into the air by winnowing-forks so that the wind could blow away the chaff, leaving the ears of grain to fall again to the threshingfloor. Thus the ears of barley would be separated from the chaff. The winnowing would be followed by feasting in celebration of the gathering in of harvest.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-3.html. 2013.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Night. In Palestine, and other maritime countries, a breeze generally arises from the sea in the evening. It was then that Booz seized the opportunity of winnowing his barley; so that, at an early hour, he gave Ruth six measures, and retired to rest, beside some of the remaining sheaves (Calmet) in an adjoining apartment, erected for the protection of the reapers during the great heats, and to contain the corn in case of a shower. (Columella, i. 7. and ii. 51.) This shade was probably in the same field where Ruth had been gleaning. (Calmet) --- She might lawfully seize this opportunity (Haydock) to obtain an honest marriage. (Du Hamel)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ruth-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

he winnoweth. This was, and is to-day, the master"s work. His servants plowed, sowed, and reaped.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/ruth-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And now is not Boaz of our kindred, with whose maidens thou wast? Behold, he winnoweth barley to night in the threshingfloor.

He winnoweth barley to-night in the threshing-floor. The winnowing process is performed by throwing up the grain, after being trodden down, against the wind with a shovel. The threshing-floor, which was commonly on the harvest-field, was carefully leveled with a large cylindric roller, and consolidated with chalk, that weeds might not spring up, and that it might not chop with drought. The farmer usually remained all night in harvest-time on the threshing-floor, not only for the protection of his valuable grain, but for the winnowing. That operation was performed in the evening, to catch the breezes which blow after the close of a hot day, and which continue for the most part of the night. This duty at so important a season the master undertakes himself: and accordingly of ancient manners, Boaz, a person of considerable wealth and high rank, laid himself down to sleep on the barn floor, at the end of the heap of barley that he had been winnowing.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ruth-3.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And now is not Boaz of our kindred, with whose maidens thou wast? Behold, he winnoweth barley to night in the threshingfloor.
is not Boaz
2:20-23; Deuteronomy 25:5,6; Hebrews 2:11-14
with whose
2:8,23
he winnoweth
It is probable that the winnowing of grain was effected by taking up a portion of the corn in a sieve, and letting it down slowly in the wind; thus the grain would, by its own weight, fall in one place, while the chaff, etc., would be carried a distance by the wind. It is said here that this was done at night; probably what was threshed out in the day was winnowed in the evening, when the sea breeze set in, which was common in Palestine.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ruth 3:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ruth-3.html.

To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology