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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ruth 3:7

 

 

When Boaz had eaten and drunk and his heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of grain; and she came secretly, and uncovered his feet and lay down.

Adam Clarke Commentary

When Boaz had eaten and drunk - The Targum adds, "He blessed the name of the Lord, who had heard his prayer, and removed famine from the land of Israel."

Went to lie down - As the threshing-floors of the Eastern nations are in general in the open air, it is very likely that the owner or some confidential person continued in the fields till the grain was secured, having a tent in the place where the corn was threshed and winnowed. Boaz seems to have acted thus.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ruth-3.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his heart was merry,.... Having ate and drank freely, though not to excess; and innocent mirth was always allowed in the time of harvest, and of the vintage, and of gathering the fruits of the earth, see Judges 9:27 or "his heart was good"; he was in a good frame and disposition of mind, praising God for his goodness to him, and to his people; so the Targum,"and his heart was good, and he blessed the name of the Lord who had received his prayer, and removed the famine from the land of Israel:'he went to lie down at the heap of corn; in the threshingfloor, which had either been threshed out, or lay in sheaves to be threshed out: however, it seems probable that he had laid himself down on some of the straw of the corn threshed out, with his clothes on, covering his feet with the lower part of his garment; it being usual in those countries to wear long garments, which served to sleep in by nights, as well as to cover them by day; nor was it thought mean and unworthy of persons of note to sleep in such a place, and in such a manner as thisF18"Nec pudor in stipula", &c. Ovid. Fast. l. 1. . And it might be chosen for coolness in those hot countries. Jarchi thinks it was to preserve his corn from thieves; though it might be because it was late ere the festival was over, and too late to go home, and besides he was ready for his business the next morning:

and she came softly; with stillness and quietness, as Jarchi, making as little noise as possible; or secretly, as the Targum, that no one might see her, and have knowledge of what she did:

and uncovered his feet; turned up the skirt of the garment that was upon his feet, or removed whatever covering was laid on them:

and laid her down; not on the side of him, which would have seemed immodest, but at his feet, perhaps across them.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his c heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of corn: and she came softly, and uncovered his feet, and laid her down.

(c) That is, he had refreshed himself among his servants.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/ruth-3.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of corn: and she came softly, and uncovered his feet, and laid her down.

An ordinary Reader might be tempted to conceive unfavorably of Boaz from this account; but the expressions here used concerning Boaz, favour no such ideas. It should be recollected, that in the seasons of harvest in those warm countries, it was very common to sleep in booths and tents, to avoid the excessive heat. Boaz doing this in his corn chamber, corresponded to the same. And that he had committed no excess in his supper seems evident from what is said soon after, that he blessed the Lord. Indeed the expression, that his heart was merry, means no other than that his heart was cheerful. The Chaldee paraphrase translate it that his heart was good, meaning that he was cheerful in his own mind, and thankful to the Lord for the plenty of his harvest.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/ruth-3.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ruth 3:7 And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of corn: and she came softly, and uncovered his feet, and laid her down.

Ver. 7. And when Boaz had eaten and drunk.] More freely than ordinary; as at such a feast he might. God alloweth his people an honest affluence, and "there is a time to be merry."

And his heart was merry.] Heb., Good; that is, frolic and free from cares.

At the end of the heap of corn.] {See Trapp on "Ruth 3:4"}

And she came softly, and uncovered his feet.] Or, Lifted up the clothes that were at his feet.

O prisca simplicitas! …

Integritas ubi prisca! profana o tempora! ”


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ruth-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ruth 3:7. He went to lie down at the end of the heap of corn It seems as if this were a temporary kind of rest, and that Boaz reposed here only a short time upon the present occasion; lying down in his clothes, and not going, as usual, to his house, and bed: and, possibly, Naomi, knowing this to be the custom, might therefore make choice of the present opportunity. In this situation Ruth came to him, and, dressed as she was in her best raiment, Ruth 3:3 laid herself down at his feet.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ruth-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Had eaten and drunk, to wit, liberally, as the manner was upon those occasions. See Jude 9:27 Psalms 4:7 Isaiah 9:3.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7. When Boaz had eaten — This was the evening meal, taken after the labours of the day were over.

His heart was merry — He was cheerful and happy over a bountiful harvest, and probably also with the drinking of wine.

At the end of the heap of corn — The winnowed grain was left over night lying in a heap, and this exposed the threshingfloors to the danger of being robbed. See 1 Samuel 23:1. “We have on various occasions,” says Thomson, “seen the summer threshingfloors in the open country, and the owners sleeping at them to prevent stealing.” And Captain Postans remarks: “Natives of the East [usually] care little for sleeping accommodations, but rest where weariness overcomes them, lying on the ground. They are, however, careful to cover the feet, and to do this they have a sheet of coarse cloth that they tuck under the feet, and, drawing it up over the body, suffer it to cover the face and head. An oriental seldom changes his position, and we are told that Boaz did so because he was afraid; the covering of the feet in ordinary cases is consequently not disturbed. I have frequently observed, when riding out in a native city before dawn, figures with their feet so covered, lying like monumental effigies in the pathway, and in the open verandahs of the houses.”


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-3.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of grain, and she came softly, and uncovered his feet, and laid herself down.’

There would be a good number of people present for the threshing, and all these would join in the feasting, and then seek out a place to sleep on the threshingfloor, probably a little merry from the wine. Boaz in his turn, once he had eaten and drunk also sought out a place to sleep, and he chose to lie down at the end of the heap of grain. Observing this, Ruth gave him time to settle and fall asleep, and then approached him softly, uncovered his feet, and laid herself down under that portion of his robe. It should be noted that she would remain fully clothed.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-3.html. 2013.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Ruth 3:7. And his heart was merry — Hebrew, יישׂב לבו, iitab, libbo, his heart was good, that is, cheerful and thankful for the plenty which the Lord had sent. He went to lie down at the end of the heap of corn — In his clothes, doubtless; not going as usual to his house and bed, but reposing himself here, for the sake of taking a little temporary rest, probably on the straw in the floor where his corn had been winnowed, to secure it from thieves till it could be laid up in his garner. For such was the plain way of living in those ancient times, that the most wealthy persons looked after their own business, both in the field and at home. And she came softly —

So that none perceived her, and, when he was asleep, lay down at his feet, in her clothes, which we have no reason to think she put off, as her intention was only to put him in remembrance of what the law required of him.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". Joseph Benson's Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/ruth-3.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Merry. Hebrew, "good," yet by no means intoxicated. (Du Hamel; Menochius) --- It was formerly the custom, as it is still in many places, (Haydock) to conclude the harvest with a feast; (Calmet) on which day Cato observes, that the men and oxen did not work. (De re Rust. c. 131.) Hence the vacuna of Ovid. (Fast. vi.) (Tirinus) --- The pagans did this in honour of Jupiter and Ceres. But the true God had enjoined his people (Haydock) to offer the first-fruits to him, and to feast in his presence, Leviticus xxiii. 10., and Deuteronomy xxvi. 21. --- Sheaves, either of corn or of straw. (Septuagint) --- The Arabs and neighbouring nations still delight to rest upon the ground, with some clothes thrown over them. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ruth-3.html. 1859.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of corn: and she came softly, and uncovered his feet, and laid her down.
his heart
Genesis 43:34; Judges 16:25; 19:6,9,22; 2 Samuel 13:28; Esther 1:10; Psalms 104:15; Ecclesiastes 2:24; 3:12,13; 8:15; 9:7; 10:19; 1 Corinthians 10:31; Ephesians 5:18
went to lie
Such was the simplicity of those early times, that the most wealthy persons looked after their own affairs, both at home and in the field. These threshing-floors were covered at top to keep off the rain, but lay open on all sides, that the wind might come in freely, for winnowing the corn; which being done, it is probable they were shut up at night, with doors fitted to them, that if any one lay there he might be kept warm, and the corn be secured from robbers.

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ruth 3:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ruth-3.html.

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