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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ruth 3:8

 

 

It happened in the middle of the night that the man was startled and bent forward; and behold, a woman was lying at his feet.

Adam Clarke Commentary

The man was afraid, and turned himself - The verb ילפת yillapheth, which we render he turned himself, has puzzled even the Targumist, who translates the clause thus: "The man trembled, and his flesh became like a (boiled) turnip through fear." It is fully evident Boaz had no intimation of the present proceedings. To this verse the Targumist adds much; he says, "Boaz subdued his concupiscence, and acted towards her as Joseph did to the Egyptian wife of his master, and as Pelatiel, the son of Laish the pious, did to Michal, the daughter of Saul, the wife of David, who put a sword between Michal and himself, because he would not approach to her."


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ruth-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Turned himself - Rather, “bent forward,” so as to feel what it was which was at his feet. The same word is translated “took hold of,” in Judges 16:29.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/ruth-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And it came to pass at midnight,.... So long Boaz slept without knowledge of any person being at his feet, and so long Ruth had lain there; but awaking, and perceiving something at his feet, which pressed them, it made him look about and feel, and so affected him:

that the man was afraid; though a man, and a man of spirit, he was afraid, a panic seized him, not knowing but it might be a spectre, a spirit, or a demon, as Jarchi; and such an instance we have in historyF19Alex. ab Alex. Genial. Dier. l. 2. c. 9. of an apparition, which seemed to put off clothes, and place itself in a bed where a man lay, &c.

and turned himself; to see who it was:

and, behold, a woman lay at his feet; which he knew by putting his hand upon her head, as Jarchi thinks, and so knew her by her headdress, or vail; or rather by her voice, as Aben Ezra, and who supposes the moon might shine, and he might be able to discern she had no beard, as well as also discover her by her clothes.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-3.html. 1999.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

About midnight the man was startled, namely, because on awaking he observed that there was some one lying at his feet; and he “bent himself” forward, or on one side, to feel who was lying there, “ and behold a woman was lying at his feet. ” מרגּלתיו is accus . loci .


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The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/ruth-3.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And it came to pass at midnight, that the man was afraid, and turned himself: and, behold, a woman lay at his feet.

At midnight — He did not discover her sooner.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ruth-3.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ruth 3:8 And it came to pass at midnight, that the man was afraid, and turned himself: and, behold, a woman lay at his feet.

Ver. 8. That the man was afraid.] Timor est constrictio cordis ex sensu mali instantis. Fear is a passion of the soul, shrinking in itself from some imminent evil. The Greeks call it δειμα, quasi ligamentum, a bond: quasi gelu astringit, saith Nazianzen, it binds up the heart as a frost doth the earth. Boaz might possibly fear that it was some evil spirit that had assumed a body, and got to bed to him. Alexander from Alexandria (a) telleth of such things that have happened. And another writeth of a gallant, who meeting with a beautiful dame, and having enjoyed his fleshly desires of her, found her in the morning to be the dead body of one that he had formerly sinned with, which had been acted by the devil all night, and left dead again in the morning.

And turned himself.] Or, Took hold on: sc., her clothes, or her headgear; whereby he perceived that it was a woman. But he was a mortified man, and an elder, πρεσβυτης, that is, one in whom the fire of lust was put out.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ruth-3.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

At midnight; he did not discover her sooner, though she did not uncover his feet, being it seems in a deep sleep, as is usual after feasts, and she doing no more that her mother commanded her, and using no words or gestures which might provoke his lust; wherein she showed her temperance and modesty, and that what she did was only by her mother’s instigation and advice, which plainly appeared from her desire expressed, Ruth 3:9, which he knew, she being a stranger, was unacquainted with. And this was the reason why Boaz was not in the least offended with her, but only commends her virtue, without any reflection upon her for this fact.

Turned himself; from the place where he lay, he raised and turned himself towards the feet, to learn who or what was there. Or, he was troubled, or afraid, or wondered; for the Hebrew word being but once used, is diversely rendered.

A woman lay at his feet; which he might understand, either by some glimmerings of light which were after midnight, which discovered her; or rather, by her voice, or out of her own mouth, who being asked, told him so much in general, before he made particular inquiry.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8. The man was afraid — Finding the covering of his feet removed, he feared that robbers might have entered his floor; but not knowing what was the matter he turned himself, that is, bent over or forward, to see and feel who or what the intruder was.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-3.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And it came about at midnight, that the man was fearful, and turned himself, and, behold, a woman lay at his feet.’

By this time it would be quite dark, and thus when Boaz awoke, and was conscious of someone lying at his feet he was a little apprehensive. Turning he noted that it was a woman. Not being able to tell who the woman was in the dimness it seemed to him quite out of place. Possibly the thought sprang though his mind that someone was trying to compromise him.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-3.html. 2013.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Troubled. Hebrew may be rendered, "and turned himself, or felt," &c. (Calmet) --- He perceived something at his feet, when he awoke, and was in consternation, particularly when he perceived, through the glimmering light, a woman at his feet. (Haydock).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ruth-3.html. 1859.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Was afraid.—Was startled. See the use of the word in Genesis 27:33.

Turned.—Literally, bent himself. (Comp. Judges 16:29.) He wakes with a start, and in turning sees a woman at his feet.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ruth 3:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://odl.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ruth-3.html. 1905.

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